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Gorillas

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snophlake
127345.  Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:00 am Reply with quote

The most common species of Gorilla, the Western Lowland Gorilla has a scientific name 'Gorilla gorilla gorilla'.

Gorillas laugh when they are tickled.

 
Mr C
134035.  Fri Jan 12, 2007 10:10 am Reply with quote

So therfore

Pufinus Pufinus

is the er. um Manx Shearwater

Bugger

 
HasBeany
151234.  Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:32 pm Reply with quote

snophlake wrote:


Gorillas laugh when they are tickled.


Hi!

Actually all the apes laugh when they're tickled ... and, yes, I have tickled some young chimps, gorillas, and orangs. They also love you to blow gently over their faces, and click your fingernails near their ears. If you like I'll expand and expound ... but just to say, once upon a time I spent the best part of 6 months in a cage with two young orangutans at the LA zoo when I lived there for a while. It was without doubt one of the best experiences of my life.

Chimps, btw, are Pan troglodytes
Orangs: Pongo pygmaeus

 
Jenny
151399.  Sun Feb 25, 2007 4:58 pm Reply with quote

HasBeany - maybe you should start a thread about orangutans and write something about them? Sounds like a fascinating experience.

 
HasBeany
151411.  Sun Feb 25, 2007 5:59 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
HasBeany - maybe you should start a thread about orangutans and write something about them? Sounds like a fascinating experience.


Hi Jenny, and thanks

Yup, been thinking the same thing. And I will ... just gimme a couple of days. :)

 
Archie
151415.  Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:03 pm Reply with quote

I want to know why you were living in a zoo...

 
HasBeany
151425.  Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:58 pm Reply with quote

Archie wrote:
I want to know why you were living in a zoo...


Hi Archie ... all will be revealed!

 
HasBeany
152534.  Thu Mar 01, 2007 7:38 am Reply with quote

Hi Archie, and all who may find this Quite Interesting:

my online story of 'living' with baby apes

Enjoy!


Last edited by HasBeany on Sun Mar 04, 2007 2:28 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
153200.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 9:25 pm Reply with quote

That was very interesting indeed Beth. I've recently read a book called Kicked, Bitten and Scratched, by Amy Sutherland, about a college in California which trains people to work with exotic animals, and this was an interesting addition to that.

 
HasBeany
153204.  Fri Mar 02, 2007 11:13 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
That was very interesting indeed Beth. I've recently read a book called Kicked, Bitten and Scratched, by Amy Sutherland, about a college in California which trains people to work with exotic animals, and this was an interesting addition to that.


Thanks, Jenny, I'm so glad you liked my notes.

I've heard about the Sutherland book, tho haven't read it. I'm a bit sceptical [yes, that IS the UK spelling!], because the things I heard about it seemed to endorse using wild animals as entertainment. This is a topic fraught with issues: moral, ecological, animal welfare, etc. What did you think when you'd read it?

 
HasBeany
153212.  Sat Mar 03, 2007 5:15 am Reply with quote

As we know, gorillas are severely threatened in the wild not only from poachers [who've cost the lives of nearly 100 dedicated rangers as well as who knows how many of these wonderful animals], but also as a result of decades of wars, primarily fomented by or against repressive regimes.

So it's news indeed to report a documented and rare gorilla birth in the Congo.

Read all about it
here.

Not to get too political but it's worth noting in context -- and it's a matter of public record; just Google it -- that among the contributions of other countries, the US has protected its mineral business interests throughout the region over the past century or so by propping up many of the ruling dictatorships, including by direct funding, military training, and so-called "on the ground support."

Yes, it makes me furious, not least because we in the west have only become aware of gorillas in the past 150 years, and have only realised their intelligence, resourcefulness, close genetic connection, and gentleness over the past 40 years. And now the entire wild population is on the brink of extinction. I just think gorillas are more important than zinc.


Last edited by HasBeany on Sun Mar 04, 2007 2:28 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
153344.  Sat Mar 03, 2007 4:58 pm Reply with quote

Beth - I went into reading it with the same thought as you - that using animals for entertainment is somewhat morally suspect.

However, it was very interesting to read how this particular course trains people to work with animals in a way that reinforces natural behaviours to get a desired result, so that although they are conditioned it doesn't seem to be done with any sort of unkindness. This is at least an improvement on earlier methods of training, which were based on punishment and coercion. The trainees described in the book seemed to be sincerely devoted to the welfare of the animals they worked with, and since the likelihood of animals ceasing to be used in various branches of the entertainment industry seems to be small, at least it's better than it was.

The book is worth a read, and you would be in a better position than most people to evaluate the information in it.

 
HasBeany
153395.  Sun Mar 04, 2007 2:26 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Beth - I went into reading it with the same thought as you - that using animals for entertainment is somewhat morally suspect.

However, it was very interesting to read how this particular course trains people to work with animals in a way that reinforces natural behaviours to get a desired result, so that although they are conditioned it doesn't seem to be done with any sort of unkindness. This is at least an improvement on earlier methods of training, which were based on punishment and coercion. The trainees described in the book seemed to be sincerely devoted to the welfare of the animals they worked with, and since the likelihood of animals ceasing to be used in various branches of the entertainment industry seems to be small, at least it's better than it was.

The book is worth a read, and you would be in a better position than most people to evaluate the information in it.


Good points, well made, Jenny. I'll try me best to get hold of a copy. Of course, my reservations aren't for such well-trained trainers ... it's the unintended consequences arising from the very concept that wild animals can/should be used for our transient pleasure by 'taming' their natural behaviours and shaping them into some kind of performance scenario.

It encourages the more unscrupulous to justify their own practices. I don't ever again want to hear about bears being 'trained' to dance by making them stand on an electrified surface which has currents passed through it. Or that so-called 'tame' Las Vegas tigers maul their 'trainers' however loving and caring.

It brings up the whole zoo debate as well. And, I must admit to great feelings of ambivalence here, given the fact that I probably wouldn't be so enamoured of all animals without the influence of zoos and, yes, even circuses in my childhood -- way back in the Neanderthal days! ;)

Happily, the laws about animal welfare in zoos and circuses have changed -- though are only stringently enforced in the west. But it's principles that concern me. We live in a society which still values corporate profits above even the extinction of entire species.

I know this is a long way from a book about good practice in wild animal training ... but, hey, that's the meandering beauty of forum posting, innit?!

 
Jenny
156594.  Wed Mar 14, 2007 3:55 pm Reply with quote

People are more closely related to chimps than chimps are to gorillas.

 
Zebra57
650018.  Sat Dec 26, 2009 1:43 pm Reply with quote

People are most closely related to the bonobo

 

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