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Camels

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Flash
16441.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 7:05 am Reply with quote

This is fairly widespread "out there", though I've never seen the source. Personally I don't believe that you could train camels to walk in alphabetical order, but the rest of it sounds ok.

 
Gray
16471.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:30 am Reply with quote

As far as I can tell, the source (for the internet at least) seems to be Alberto Manguel's book A History of Reading, which it might be worth getting for the library. I wonder if there are sources and references in it...

 
Flash
16498.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 12:55 pm Reply with quote

There must be a contemporary source as well, though.

 
Gray
17512.  Wed Apr 13, 2005 4:41 am Reply with quote

If we can't get this in, there's something seriously wrong with us:
Quote:
Camel racing is to be transformed as a spectator sport in the United Arab Emirates with robot riders taking the place of child jockeys.

The remotely operated riders were developed following a ban on the use of jockeys under 16 years of age, imposed by the UAE Camel Racing Association in March 2004.

Iagnemma says making a robotic jockey that could automatically control a camel during a race would be an even more interesting problem. "The logical extension is to develop an autonomous jockey," he says. "And then, I guess, a robot camel."

 
MatC
17516.  Wed Apr 13, 2005 5:18 am Reply with quote

The little tin buggers are taking over. They're also muscling in on the world's most fortified border:

www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/1113048715

 
eggshaped
17519.  Wed Apr 13, 2005 5:58 am Reply with quote

Sorry to put a serious slant on this issue, but I had no idea this kind of thing was happening. Maybe I am just too wrapped up in my naive little coccoon.

Quote:
At least 30 boys a month are being kidnapped in Pakistan to feed the banned slave trade in racing camel jockeys in the United Arab Emirates.

According to a human rights organisation in Pakistan, the number of boys - often as young as four - smuggled abroad to work at camel camps is rapidly rising.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,6903,500568,00.html

Quote:
When a Pakistan camel jockey reaches the age of seven he is already too old for the job. So even younger children are now being smuggled to the Arab desert for a national sport that ends in tragedy for most.

For the traffickers, it is child's play to slip through the loop holes in the archaic law in this Islamic republic while a toothless legal system tries to keep up with smart slave traders.

Pakistan's Federal Investigations Agency (FIA) is worried that younger boys and girls are bound for the desert, fears which were realised this month when a Dubai-bound woman was caught with five children, aged three to seven.

Officially, the use of child jockeys and jockeys weighing less than 45 kilograms (100 pounds) has been banned in the UAE since January 1993, but activists say violations of the law are rampant.

No skills are required of a child jockey, merely lightness, and good lungs. He or she must be terrified enough to scream. That makes the beast run faster and thrills their Arab masters.

http://dailynews.lk/2002/07/24/fea06.html

Further reading:

http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_488392.html?menu=news.latestheadlines
http://www.antislavery.org/archive/submission/submission2001-UAE.htm

 
MatC
18011.  Wed Apr 20, 2005 9:37 am Reply with quote

Elephants have only been never forgetting since the 20th century - for centuries before that it was camels that never forgot.

www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/6/messages/923.html

 
Flash
18619.  Thu Apr 28, 2005 3:15 am Reply with quote

Camels were introduced to British Columbia in the 19th century, and may have gone feral for a while:
Quote:
Camel were in experimental use in the Interior of BC during the mid-19th Century because of the dry climate and relatively waterless landscape typical of many areas. There is a creek flowing into the Bridge River near Lillooet called Camoo Creek, and the mountain range lying in the angle of the Bridge and Fraser Rivers is the Camelsfoot Range. Some of the camels were said to have gone wild, and there are apocryphal stories of people seeing camels in their vegetable gardens for some decades after the gold rush, when the camels were introduced by entrepreneur and hotelier Frank Laumeister. The last surviving camel of this enterprise died in the Kelowna area in the 1930s.

http://www.fortlangley.ca/Chinook%20Jargon/critters.html

 
Gray
18717.  Sat Apr 30, 2005 5:45 am Reply with quote

According to this news report, there are reckoned to be about half a million camels wild (livid!) in Australia since their introduction as beasts of burden in the 1880s, and subsequent release. They're planning to hunt them from helicopter, which seems appropriately Australian...

There are some wonderful old pictures here of camels being used in the outback from around 1900.

 
Jenny
18726.  Sat Apr 30, 2005 9:14 am Reply with quote

Where else are there wild camels? Wouldn't it be a nice 'general ignorance' question if there turned out to be more wild camels in Australia than anywhere else?

 
Flash
18729.  Sat Apr 30, 2005 9:41 am Reply with quote

I once met someone who had done that camel-hunting from a helicopter. They leap out of the helicopter onto the camel's back.

I believe that Australia is the only continent to which camels have been successfully introduced.

 
DELETED
18753.  Sun May 01, 2005 11:58 am Reply with quote

DELETED

 
Flash
18762.  Sun May 01, 2005 4:45 pm Reply with quote

Do we think the ancients were reaching for a way to describe a spotted camel-like animal, or did they actually think it was a hybrid?

 
eggshaped
18780.  Mon May 02, 2005 6:37 am Reply with quote

Jenny Wrote:

Quote:
Where else are there wild camels? Wouldn't it be a nice 'general ignorance' question if there turned out to be more wild camels in Australia than anywhere else?


I looked this up a month or so ago,wondering if there may be more in US zoos than in any other country - but in Somalia (or it may be Sudan - I always get them mixed up) there are several million more in the wild than anywhere else.

 
MatC
18787.  Mon May 02, 2005 8:48 am Reply with quote

A report in The Independent last week is headlined "Ban on child camel jockeys sends a brutal trade underground."

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/asia/story.jsp?story=634019

 

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