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decadence

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AlmondFacialBar
124054.  Tue Dec 05, 2006 10:43 pm Reply with quote

i feel very strongly that the world needs a qi on decadence, featuring green carnations and what have you. anyone can think of cool questions on the topic?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Jenny
124063.  Tue Dec 05, 2006 10:51 pm Reply with quote

Sadly, the D series is not only recorded but almost finished broadcasting. Can you think of an E connection for decadence?

 
AlmondFacialBar
124073.  Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:02 am Reply with quote

hm yeah, good point, that. shame, though. ;-) decadence related terms beginning with e, hm yeah. right now the only one i can think of is earnest, as in the importance of being, but watch this space (well the one under the e-thread really) ;-)

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Liebig
128848.  Sat Dec 23, 2006 9:16 pm Reply with quote

being earnest was victorian slang for being gay..sorry no source

 
tetsabb
128878.  Sun Dec 24, 2006 8:32 am Reply with quote

'edonism?

 
Tas
128926.  Sun Dec 24, 2006 6:51 pm Reply with quote

Extreme Decadence?

:-)

Tas

 
Flash
128939.  Sun Dec 24, 2006 9:44 pm Reply with quote

Liebig wrote:
being earnest was victorian slang for being gay..sorry no source


Simon, is that you? Happy Season of Excess, if so.

I'd heard this (earnest = gay) as the 'meaning' of "The Importance of Being Earnest", but then I've also seen a refutation which says that this notion is a recent gloss. My Penguin Dictionary of Historical Slang does list 'earnest' but not with this sense ("a share of the booty" is what it says). Here's the wiki:

Quote:
Wilde's use of the name Ernest may possibly be an in-joke. John Gambril Nicholson in his poem "Of Boy's Names" (Love in Earnest: Sonnets, Ballades, and Lyrics (1892)) contains the lines: " Though Frank may ring like silver bell, And Cecil softer music claim, They cannot work the miracle, 'Tis Ernest sets my heart a-flame." The poem was promoted by John Addington Symonds and Nicholson and Wilde contributed pieces to the same issue of The Chameleon magazine. See D'arch Smith, Timothy: Love In Earnest: Some Notes on the Lives and Writings of English "Uranian" Poets from 1889 to 1930 (1970). Theo Aronson has suggested that the word "earnest" became a code-word for homosexual, as in: "Is he earnest?", in the same way that "Is he so?" and "Is he musical?" were also employed. See Aronson, Theo: Prince Eddy and the Homosexual Underworld (1994). ...

While these words may have been such mild in-jokes, Sir Donald Sinden, who had met two of the play's original participants in the 1940s: Irene Vanbrugh, the first Gwendolen; Allan Aynesworth, the first Algy; as well as Lord Alfred Douglas, wrote to The Times to dispute that the words held any sexual connotations, or that 'Cecily' was a synonym for a rentboy: "Although they had ample opportunity, at no time did any of them even hint that Earnest was a synonym for homosexual, or that Bunburying may have implied homosexual sex. The first time I heard it mentioned was in the 1980s and I immediately consulted Sir John Gielgud whose own performance of John Worthing in the same play was legendary and whose knowledge of theatrical lore was encyclopaedic. He replied in his ringing tones: "No-No! Nonsense, absolute nonsense: I would have known." (The Times, 2 February 2001).

 

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