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CaptTimmy
120769.  Sun Nov 26, 2006 1:10 am Reply with quote

Lumpo31 wrote:
The YouTube clip freaked me out a bit...Interesting because it looked a lot like the illustration on this site - http://tinyurl.com/y5he3w (Australian Yowie Research).


Well using deductive reasoning, that leaves one of two possibilities. (Actually three...the third being that I spelled possibilities wrong. Moving on) Either the illustration is the way it is to conform to the videos or the illustration is accurate. I really can't say from the opposite side of the world.

 
Lumpo31
120777.  Sun Nov 26, 2006 3:00 am Reply with quote

CaptTimmy wrote:

Well using deductive reasoning, that leaves one of two possibilities. (Actually three...the third being that I spelled possibilities wrong. Moving on) Either the illustration is the way it is to conform to the videos or the illustration is accurate. I really can't say from the opposite side of the world.


The site with the illustration existed before the YouTube vid...I would suggest that the makers of the YouTube vid (rumoured to have had something to do with the Star Wars films made in Sydney...did I say hoax?) was familiar with the accepted appearance of Yowies, and also with their characteristics (for instance, they apparently squash themselves close to trees so they may observe without being observed).

Still fairly freaky though.

Lisa

 
Lumpo31
120778.  Sun Nov 26, 2006 3:13 am Reply with quote

CaptTimmy wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ax0-JZrwsA&mode=related&search=

Still on the topic of bigfoot et al. Here is a clip slightly closer to home for some, Esholt woods (in the U.K.), specifically.


Goodness me! Looks like a cross between the "Patterson Film" http://home.clara.net/rfthomas/bf_pgfilm.html and this one, the "Yarram Ape" - http://www.cryptomundo.com/wp-content/290620018.jpg

Lisa

 
hetch
123464.  Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:29 am Reply with quote

Lumpo31 wrote:
Grow up in Australia and you live with the understanding that Australia is the largest island and the smallest continent (continent in terms of there being Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Europe, Antarctica...and Australia).

New Zealand and Papua New Guinea are not continents, nor do they belong to any continents (although you could argue that the Papua bit, being part of Indonesia, is therefore politically part of the Asian continent). They are islands...They are part of the Australasia/Oceania region, but they aren't part of the Australian continent.

Lisa, this theory you were taught in school must hang on the assumption that the likes of New Zealand and the various Pacific Islands either belong to a different continent than Australia or to no continent at all.

As, you state above, you definitely believe in the latter.

However, geographically speaking, is it possible for a country to belong to no continent? When I was in school (in Ireland) we were taught that Australia was one of five continents (one America, they didn't bother with Antarctica...) but it supposedly included New Zealand et al. As an example, check out this image on Wikipedia (which includes the full seven - unlike my schooling!): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Continents_vide_couleurs.png

The continent called "Australia/Oceania" in this map is pretty much the Australian continent of my schooldays.

However, this means that, in my world anyway, the country of Australia does not span the continent of Australia. If only they'd had a bit more originality naming the continent, this confusion would never have arisen....

 
CaptTimmy
123521.  Mon Dec 04, 2006 2:54 pm Reply with quote

Aside from the continent debate, I've found that AC\DC is band from Australia, thus making Australia the greatest country on Earth.

 
strukkanurv
123581.  Mon Dec 04, 2006 5:51 pm Reply with quote

John Butler also hails from Australia, making it a truly interesting place.

 
Jenny
124879.  Thu Dec 07, 2006 10:40 pm Reply with quote

Is Australia the only place where there are examples of poisonous creatures from every order, even the Mammalia?

 
CaptTimmy
124885.  Thu Dec 07, 2006 10:55 pm Reply with quote

Right you are Jenny.

 
Jenny
124888.  Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:06 pm Reply with quote

But is there anywhere else in the world where that is true? Or is the duck-billed platypus the only poisonous mammal in the world?

 
Jenny
124890.  Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:17 pm Reply with quote

Another theory bites the dust - a search for 'poisonous mammals' has turned up another four, not originating from Australia, although they are insectivores and not lethal to humans.

The Southern short-tailed shrew (Blarina species) has venom in its saliva strong enough to kill mice but not lethal to people. It's poison is both a neurotoxin and a hemotoxin, and the poisoned insects stay alive but immobile for three to five days. It is the only poisonous mammal in North America.

The water shrew (Neomys species) of Eurasia has a similar saliva venomous saliva, but preys on snails, mollusks, and freshwater insects.

Both species of the solenodon of the West Indies (Solenodon paradoxus and Solenodon cubanus) are also poisonous. They are nocturnal and the size of a rat. Like the shrews, their saliva is venomous. They prey on ants, insects, grubs and small reptiles.

When all these creatures bite their prey, the venomous saliva oozes down ducts to the base of the lower incisors, and from there along channels in the teeth and into the wound.

http://www.wonderquest.com/shark-dolphin-buddies-toxic-mammals-soap-germs.htm

 
CaptTimmy
124892.  Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:39 pm Reply with quote

ooh...I misunderstood the question. I believe they are, and if not, I can count the others on one hand.

EDIT: I wrote this before Jenny's post, but walked away and didn't bother to refresh. So I was right. I can count them on exactly one hand.

 
samivel
124930.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:11 am Reply with quote

Only if you have the full compliment of digits, though.

 
CaptTimmy
125022.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:15 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
Only if you have the full compliment of digits, though.


I'm pretty sure I do. However, Mordecai "Three-Finger" Brown might have some trouble counting them.

Baseball Hall of Fame wrote:
Tagged with the nickname “Three Finger” because he lost part of his index finger in a farm-machinery accident in his youth,...

 
dr.bob
125032.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:32 am Reply with quote

Then with one hand (including thumb) he can count up to 15.

If he counts in binary.

 
CaptTimmy
128544.  Fri Dec 22, 2006 12:06 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Then with one hand (including thumb) he can count up to 15.

If he counts in binary.


so how high can a human with all ten of the normal metacarpel appendages attached count, opposed to "Three Fingers"?

I'm not very familiar at all with the binary system, except that it involves ones and zeros.

 

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