View previous topic | View next topic

Panthers

Page 1 of 1

Felix
119770.  Thu Nov 23, 2006 5:35 am Reply with quote

There is a general misconception that the panther is either a distinct species of big cat, or that it is specifically a black leopard.

Apple has helped compound this myth by releasing separate versions of its OS X software called Panther OS X v10.3 and the newest release Leopard OS X v10.5.

In truth, panther is simply an alternative name for a leopard (panthera pardus). Commonly a panther/leopard is a tawny golden colour with dark rosette marking. A gene mutation means that a small percentage have melanistic colouring and appear completely black. However, the rosette markings are still visible... if you can get close enough to see them!

There is a similar gene mutation in jaguars but not in cheetahs. Marwell Zoo in Hampshire used to have the UK's only black jaguars (not sure if they're still there).

 
eggshaped
127628.  Mon Dec 18, 2006 10:33 am Reply with quote

The Marwell jaguars are now kept at Chester Zoo.

 
Birdman
195662.  Sat Jul 28, 2007 5:03 am Reply with quote

I have recently read that the melanotic mutation is more common in Jaguars than Leopards. The mutation is adominant gene mutation in Jaguars, that is only one parent needs to have the trait, while it is recessive in Leopards, both parents need to be carriers of the gene to produce a black cub.

 
swot
195666.  Sat Jul 28, 2007 5:13 am Reply with quote

Felix wrote:

In truth, panther is simply an alternative name for a leopard (panthera pardus). Commonly a panther/leopard is a tawny golden colour with dark rosette marking. A gene mutation means that a small percentage have melanistic colouring and appear completely black. However, the rosette markings are still visible... if you can get close enough to see them!


Ah, so black panther isn't actually tautology?

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1080082.  Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:40 am Reply with quote

In the Imbroglio episode Stephen Fry claims Leopards are so called because they are 'bearded' lions. Actually the Anglo-French word ‘pard’ or ‘parde’ (see also ‘pardales’) meant the creature which mated with the lioness to produce the leopard (much like the ‘liger’ today). Pard’s may have been panthers or may never have existed as a separate animal but there are hints from the time that the leopard was associated with bastard offspring (see Isidore of Seville and Bartholomaeus Angelicus and Nicholas Upton) and, at a stretch of the imagination, some have suggested the three leopards on Richard the Lionheart’s coat of arms are an allusion to his grandfather, William the Conqueror(aka William the Bastard).

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group