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Dundonian (Scottish) inventions

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!!!Chris!!!
110228.  Tue Oct 31, 2006 7:16 pm Reply with quote

the episode of Qi where steven lists all the scottish inventions he could think of, and i realised he missed out the electric lightbulb =p

http://www.dundeecity.gov.uk/centlib/jbl/james.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_bulb

Wikipedia wrote:
In 1835 James Bowman Lindsay demonstrated a constant electric light at a public meeting in Dundee, Scotland. He stated that he could "read a book at a distance of one and a half feet". However, having perfected the device to his own satisfaction, he turned to the problem of wireless telegraphy and did not develop the electric light any further. His claims are not well documented.



Sorry if it's already been pointed out, i'm a newby here =p

 
samivel
110238.  Tue Oct 31, 2006 7:36 pm Reply with quote

Welcome :)

 
JumpingJack
110243.  Tue Oct 31, 2006 7:51 pm Reply with quote

!!!!!!!!!!Chris!!!!!!!!!!

The invention of the lightbulb is claimed by many, It may well be that a Dundonian has precedence in this matter. However, here is the view of the usually reliable Enchanted Learning site:

Quote:
The first electric light was made in 1800 by Humphry Davy, an English scientist. He experimented with electricity and invented an electric battery. When he connected wires to his battery and a piece of carbon, the carbon glowed, producing light. This is called an electric arc.

Much later, in 1860, the English physicist Sir Joseph Wilson Swan (1828-1914) was determined to devise a practical, long-lasting electric light. He found that a carbon paper filament worked well, but burned up quickly. In 1878, he demonstrated his new electric lamps in Newcastle, England.

In 1877, the American Charles Francis Brush manufactured some carbon arcs to light a public square in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. These arcs were used on a few streets, in a few large office buildings, and even some stores. Electric lights were only used by a few people.

The inventor Thomas Alva Edison (in the USA) experimented with thousands of different filaments to find just the right materials to glow well and be long-lasting. In 1879, Edison discovered that a carbon filament in an oxygen-free bulb glowed but did not burn up for 40 hours. Edison eventually produced a bulb that could glow for over 1500 hours.

 
!!!Chris!!!
110259.  Tue Oct 31, 2006 9:26 pm Reply with quote

JumpingJack wrote:
!!!!!!!!!!Chris!!!!!!!!!!

The invention of the lightbulb is claimed by many, It may well be that a Dundonian has precedence in this matter. However, here is the view of the usually reliable Enchanted Learning site:

Quote:
The first electric light was made in 1800 by Humphry Davy, an English scientist. He experimented with electricity and invented an electric battery. When he connected wires to his battery and a piece of carbon, the carbon glowed, producing light. This is called an electric arc.

Much later, in 1860, the English physicist Sir Joseph Wilson Swan (1828-1914) was determined to devise a practical, long-lasting electric light. He found that a carbon paper filament worked well, but burned up quickly. In 1878, he demonstrated his new electric lamps in Newcastle, England.

In 1877, the American Charles Francis Brush manufactured some carbon arcs to light a public square in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. These arcs were used on a few streets, in a few large office buildings, and even some stores. Electric lights were only used by a few people.

The inventor Thomas Alva Edison (in the USA) experimented with thousands of different filaments to find just the right materials to glow well and be long-lasting. In 1879, Edison discovered that a carbon filament in an oxygen-free bulb glowed but did not burn up for 40 hours. Edison eventually produced a bulb that could glow for over 1500 hours.


Technically speaking, the 1800 version wasn't a Bulb =p

 
Jenny
110276.  Tue Oct 31, 2006 11:25 pm Reply with quote

Welcome !!!!!Chris!!!!! :-)

 
samivel
110332.  Wed Nov 01, 2006 4:03 am Reply with quote

!!!Chris!!! wrote:
Technically speaking, the 1800 version wasn't a Bulb =p



Well, still technically speaking, the source you mention doesn't say that Lindsay's light was a bulb, either.

:P

 
!!!Chris!!!
111508.  Thu Nov 02, 2006 9:08 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
!!!Chris!!! wrote:
Technically speaking, the 1800 version wasn't a Bulb =p



Well, still technically speaking, the source you mention doesn't say that Lindsay's light was a bulb, either.

:P


Touché

I read in an archived news paper from the time that it was a bulb, my dad has it =p the headline was "Dundee's Brightest Spark" ... i could have sworn it said it was a bulb =p ... eh maybe i'm wrong, but i coulda sworn it said it was a bulb =p

Jenny wrote:
Welcome !!!!!Chris!!!!! :-)


Thanks =D =p

 
Efros
119551.  Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:33 am Reply with quote

JumpingJack wrote:
!!!!!!!!!!Chris!!!!!!!!!!

The invention of the lightbulb is claimed by many, It may well be that a Dundonian has precedence in this matter. However, here is the view of the usually reliable Enchanted Learning site:

Quote:
The first electric light was made in 1800 by Humphry Davy, an English scientist. He experimented with electricity and invented an electric battery. When he connected wires to his battery and a piece of carbon, the carbon glowed, producing light. This is called an electric arc.



This isn't an electric arc it is merely resistive heating, for an arc to form there must be a gap, the light is produced by the electrical discharge and not the heating of the carbon. I doubt if Davy could generate the required voltage from his batteries to generate an arc, although he probably had sufficient current to heat the carbon reistively such that it glowed.

 

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