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Rabbits

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Ameena
110717.  Wed Nov 01, 2006 2:43 pm Reply with quote

Do we? Which month?

 
Cleverina Clogs
113142.  Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:41 am Reply with quote

every month

 
gerontius grumpus
123141.  Sun Dec 03, 2006 8:20 am Reply with quote

Rabbits are thought to have been introduced into England by the Normans. In the middle ages they were kept in warrens.

The prctice of eating their own dung is called refection, they do this because the digestion of cellulose in their diet, by the gut biota, takes place distally to where sugars are absorbed by the gut. Only faeces that contain the absorbable products of digestion are eaten.

 
Ejob
123153.  Sun Dec 03, 2006 8:49 am Reply with quote

Ameena wrote:
Does anyone know the words for "baby mammals born without eyes/ears/fur etc (eg rats, dogs)" and "baby mammals born like little copies of adults" (eg guinea pigs, chinchillas)? It's been bugging me for ages...there's a word for one and a word for the other and I was told it several times when I was at college but always just forgot it straight away :P.


Maybe you mean precocial and altricial? Precocial meaning those that are relatively mature and mobile from the moment of birth or hatching, and altricial being the opposite.

Edit: it's not only used for mammals but also for birds.

 
Ameena
123227.  Sun Dec 03, 2006 1:18 pm Reply with quote

Oh yeah, I found it now - my friend asked someone about a week ago and phoned me up to tell me, lol. And so far I haven't managed to forget them straight away :O.
Still, thanks for the info - shows I would have found out eventually even if she hadn't phoned and told me ;).

 
grimwig
124144.  Wed Dec 06, 2006 6:42 am Reply with quote

In Japanese tradition, rabbits live on the Moon where they make mochi the popular snack of mashed sticky rice. This comes from interpreting the pattern of dark patches on the moon as a rabbit standing on tiptoes on the left pounding on an usu, a Japanese mortar (See also: Man in the moon). A pop culture manifestation of this tradition can be found in the character title character of Sailor Moon, whose name is Usagi Tsukino, Japanese for "rabbit of the moon". Similarly, Japanese-American Stan Sakai's comic book character of Usagi Yojimbo is an anthropomorphic samurai rabbit based loosely on Japanese swordsman Miyamoto Musashi

(from Wiki)

 
ikkan
137346.  Mon Jan 22, 2007 3:23 am Reply with quote

I have a rabbit and it does eat lettuce without getting the diahorrors. It has to eat quite a bit to get ill, but then again, too much of any food'll make a rabbit, or any other animal, ill. I've owned rats too and they never ate rat food. They ate anything I did, even stealing whole slices of toast from my plate if I looked away... Their favorite food was pasta (cooked of course) and boiled potato... and rice... and chicken korma...
Well, anyway, I think rabbits can be occasionally like Guinea Pigs: they don't know when to stop eating. That's why you're advised against feeding your rabbit lettuce, but it's fine if you know how much to give. My first rabbit, Skye, loved Quorn! To the point of climbing up to you in an attempt to steal it out of your mouth... :)

 
themoog
137383.  Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:03 am Reply with quote

Ejob wrote:
Ameena wrote:
Does anyone know the words for "baby mammals born without eyes/ears/fur etc (eg rats, dogs)" and "baby mammals born like little copies of adults" (eg guinea pigs, chinchillas)? It's been bugging me for ages...there's a word for one and a word for the other and I was told it several times when I was at college but always just forgot it straight away :P.


Maybe you mean precocial and altricial? Precocial meaning those that are relatively mature and mobile from the moment of birth or hatching, and altricial being the opposite.

Edit: it's not only used for mammals but also for birds.


The terms nidicolous (remaining in the nest) and nidifugous (leaving the nest shortly after birth) are more usually applied to birds.

 
themoog
137387.  Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:09 am Reply with quote

Can't say I buy the energy thing. I was practically raised on Rabbit (although I admit I was fed other stuff ;) ).

BTW, try not to refer to them as Rabbits on the Isle of Portland. They were always referred to as bunnies, when I was there. This was supposedly due to them causing subsidence by burrowing, although the stories I heard are not quite the same as those mentioned in the Wiki article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Portland#Trivia

 
Frances
137620.  Mon Jan 22, 2007 10:17 am Reply with quote

The energy thing is probably simply a lack of the fat which humans need to be able to digest their food properly. Game - rabbits, venison, etc - doesn't have enough to keep us going. We need other kinds of meat or oily food, or we just get thinner and thinner until - hey, this is a neat kind of diet! I love venison!

Incidentally, game is also a good diet for some of those suffering from arthritis. If they avoid beef, lamb and pork, the joint inflammation goes right down.

 
costean
153316.  Sat Mar 03, 2007 1:23 pm Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
I've heard that you can starve to death eating rabbit on it's own, as the human body burns more energy digesting the meal than it gains. Is this a nurban miff?

No, as Frances alluded to in her post above, there is a form of acute malnutrition caused by an excess of extremely lean meat combined with a lack of other nutrients. It is known as - wait for it - Rabbit Starvation.

Quote:
The human physiologic protein ceiling is, in short, the upper limit of dietary protein that humans can digest. Small animals have less fat and more protein for their size than large animals do. The total protein content of a rabbit may be as high as 75%, with 25% fat, while a large animal may be only 35% protein and 65% fat. The maximum amount of protein humans can process at one time is about 35% to 40%. Therefore, using rabbits as a food source will rapidly exceed our protein ceiling, causing a syndrome referred to by early arctic explorers and frontiersmen as "rabbit starvation." Despite eating huge amounts of lean meat, men afflicted with rabbit starvation quickly became lethargic and developed diarrhea; death eventually followed.

From an article by Professor Loren Cordain. The Paleo Diet

I am not in any way advocating following this 'Paleo-Diet' or any other for that matter. By way of balance the following site extensively quotes Vilhjalmur Stefansson; he takes a different view about low-fat diets (he agrees with the Rabbit Starvation bit).

Quote:
[Stefansson] who spent many years living with the Eskimos and Indians of Northern Canada ...The ratio of fat to protein in pemmican [staple travel/survival food] was 80%-20%. As lean meat from game animals was often given to the dogs, there is no reason to suppose that everyday fare did not have the same proportions: 80% fat (mostly highly saturated fat) to 20% protein-in a population in which heart disease and cancer were nonexistent.

vilhjalmur_stefansson

Rabbit and other lean meats such as game are extremely good for you, as long as they are part of a balanced diet.

So don't eat refined sugars, processed food and supermarket convenience stuff. Make sure you eat plenty of fruit, vegetables, proteins and the right sort of fats. Easy, isn't it? Oh, and try and be nice to your neighbours, be kind to animals, read a good book every now again, etc. <From the Gospel according St Costean (and Monty Python)>

 
BronzeSheWolf
154629.  Wed Mar 07, 2007 2:09 pm Reply with quote

Are rabbits colour blind?

 
Corvus
215809.  Tue Oct 02, 2007 6:26 am Reply with quote

themoog wrote:
Can't say I buy the energy thing. I was practically raised on Rabbit (although I admit I was fed other stuff ;) ).

BTW, try not to refer to them as Rabbits on the Isle of Portland. They were always referred to as bunnies, when I was there. This was supposedly due to them causing subsidence by burrowing, although the stories I heard are not quite the same as those mentioned in the Wiki article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Portland#Trivia


There is also a tale of a witch that turned into a rabbit in that area, I know this cause I was born there.
The story goes that a witch and her daughter were found out and chased into a field of wheat, the villagers burnt the field and the witch and her daughter were not found only 2 rabbits running away.

 
indigo fugit
265582.  Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:39 pm Reply with quote

i will award a genuine four leaved clover to the first person to answer the following question correctly.

Question.

When a rabbit digs his burrow, why doesn't he have a big pile of earth at the entrance ??

 
Sebastian flyte
267364.  Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:20 am Reply with quote

I think its the ladybuns that do the digging and men make a little scratch to lie down in, although I might be wrong. No idea about the dirt pile though, do they beat it into the walls of the burrow with those nice big feet?

<awaits Klaxon>

 

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