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Rabbits

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Cleverina Clogs
102469.  Thu Oct 12, 2006 10:47 am Reply with quote

Baby rabbits have no fur! How unsnuggly!

 
Ameena
102476.  Thu Oct 12, 2006 10:53 am Reply with quote

A lot of baby mammals have no fur. And it's really been bugging both myself and my friend, but there's a word for those kinds of mammals to differentiate them from the mammals who are born with fur and things, such as guinea pigs and chinchillas. I was told a few times at college but I kept forgetting it. Arrrgh...
Hmm anyway, what do I know about rabbits...erm...well, this is probably one of those really obvious things but I'll say it anyway - rabbits aren't rodents. They're lagomorphs (never seen it written down, I don't think, but that's how I picture it to be spelt so please correct me if I'm wrong), as are hares. I'm not sure, however, what makes a lagomorph different from a rodent. They're small(ish), they're furry, their incisors never stop growing so they have to gnaw on stuff (one of the main requirements to be defined as a rodent since the word "rodent" comes from the Latin "rodere", which means "to gnaw" or "to chew" or something), umm...they run around...erm...yeah. Stuff. They're herbivorous...but so are guinea pigs, who are rodents. I should look this up...

 
Tas
102498.  Thu Oct 12, 2006 11:21 am Reply with quote

Yes, you should. And be quick about it.

:-)

Tas

 
96aelw
102645.  Thu Oct 12, 2006 5:03 pm Reply with quote

Wiki reckons that the distinctions are that lagomorphs have 4 upper incisors to rodents' 2, they are veggie where rodents are omnivorous (although this leaves your guines pig niggle unresolved), the chaps keep their scrotums in front of their penises, which, unlike those of rodents, contain no bones, and they eat their own poo.

Spot on with "rodere", incidentally. (You sounded unsure. Well, not sounded, obviously, but then "looked" is equally problematic, and "you typed unsure" is just gibberish (and I'm not a native of Gibber). "You typed unsurely", perhaps, but then even that seems a little presumptious given that I didn't actually watch you do it. Oh, I give up. The perils of the Steam Age).

 
Flash
102647.  Thu Oct 12, 2006 5:21 pm Reply with quote

DEFRA, which is what they call the Ministry of Agriculture these days, classifies the rabbit as an introduced species in the UK. From the UK they were introduced to Australia by one Thomas Austin, who brought 24 of them from England in 1859, saying "The introduction of a few rabbits could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting". 40 years later they were everywhere including, as it turned out, the wrong side of the famous rabbit-proof fence - so the Australians built more fences, three in all, but the rabbits got under them, through holes and through gates when they were left open. It is believed that one eighth of all native Australian mammalian species as well as many plants have been driven to extinction by the rabbit infestation.

 
Ameena
102667.  Thu Oct 12, 2006 8:42 pm Reply with quote

Regarding "rodere", it wasn't so much that I was unsure that that was what it meant, but that I wasn't sure whether it meant "to chew" or "to gnaw", or both, or something synonymous. Then again, a synonymous word could be replaced with either of the above to no ill effect, which I suppose is the point of synonyms, really ;).
I can't remember the name for when something eats its own crap...I think the word begins with "C" but I've forgotten. That's something else I was told at college too :P.
The herbivorous-omnivirous thing does seem to be a problem in the definition if it says "all rodents are omnivorous", because piggies are rodents and yet they are, as we've said, herbivores. Weeirrrd <spooky music>. Yet I think all the other (pet) rodents are omnivorous - mice, gerbies, hammies, chinnies, chippies, fuzzbutts, degus...actually, I'm not sure about degus. I don't remember giving them mealworms and stuff. Or the chinnies, actually. Err, that's chinchillas btw ;).

 
samivel
102691.  Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:25 am Reply with quote

'Coprophagous' means dung-eating, but I don't know if there's a specific term for an animal that eats its own excrement.
Scatophagy is another possibility.

 
Ameena
102756.  Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:03 am Reply with quote

Oh, I knew it began with "C", so yeah I think it's "corprophagus".
Does anyone know the words for "baby mammals born without eyes/ears/fur etc (eg rats, dogs)" and "baby mammals born like little copies of adults" (eg guinea pigs, chinchillas)? It's been bugging me for ages...there's a word for one and a word for the other and I was told it several times when I was at college but always just forgot it straight away :P.

 
96aelw
102959.  Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:53 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
'Coprophagous' means dung-eating, but I don't know if there's a specific term for an animal that eats its own excrement.


I doubt it, but if there is I would expect it to be "autocoprophagous".

 
Cleverina Clogs
107045.  Wed Oct 25, 2006 4:49 pm Reply with quote

I have heard that rabbits actually don't eat lettuce because it gives them a gippy tum (aw poor wabbits), is this true?

 
Ameena
107061.  Wed Oct 25, 2006 5:23 pm Reply with quote

I've been told that any watery vegetable (eg lettue, cucumber, etc) can give rabbits and rodents diarrhoea. I suppose if they only had a little bit, it might be okay...but other stuff like carrots and bananas or whatever are better. I've never kept rabbits myself, only various species of rodent, though there were some rabbits at college which I fed now and again.

 
samivel
107216.  Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:21 am Reply with quote

I've eaten rabbit. It's very nice, and it doesn't give you a gippy tum.

 
Tas
107218.  Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:24 am Reply with quote

I've heard that you can starve to death eating rabbit on it's own, as the human body burns more energy digesting the meal than it gains. Is this a nurban miff?

:-)

Tas

 
BondiTram
107245.  Thu Oct 26, 2006 7:00 am Reply with quote

My spaniel brought me a dead baby mouse the other day - just to prove that it didn't have fur.
He was right, it didn't.

 
Cleverina Clogs
110379.  Wed Nov 01, 2006 5:09 am Reply with quote

Slightly off topic but why do we say 'white rabbits' at the beginning of the month?

 

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