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BERMUDA

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Flash
101579.  Tue Oct 10, 2006 7:35 am Reply with quote

Bermuda is literally in the middle of nowhere, the very tip of a huge underwater mountain that just sticks out of the mid-Atlantic. When you're there you do feel that a big wave would just wash straight over it - it's tiny (27.7 square miles spread over 138 islands) but still has eight, count 'em, eight golf courses.

 
Jenny
101787.  Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:48 pm Reply with quote

Well they've had a long time to build them, judging by the date on this poem:
Quote:

Song of the Emigrants in Bermuda

Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)


WHERE the remote Bermudas ride
In the ocean’s bosom unespied,
From a small boat that row’d along
The listening winds received this song:

‘What should we do but sing His praise
That led us through the watery maze
Where He the huge sea-monsters wracks,
That lift the deep upon their backs,
Unto an isle so long unknown,
And yet far kinder than our own?
He lands us on a grassy stage,
Safe from the storms, and prelate’s rage:
He gave us this eternal spring
Which here enamels everything,
And sends the fowls to us in care
On daily visits through the air.
He hangs in shades the orange bright
Like golden lamps in a green night,
And does in the pomegranates close
Jewels more rich than Ormus shows:
He makes the figs our mouths to meet
And throws the melons at our feet;
But apples plants of such a price,
No tree could ever bear them twice.
With cedars chosen by his hand
From Lebanon he stores the land;
And makes the hollow seas that roar
Proclaim the ambergris on shore.
He cast (of which we rather boast)
The Gospel’s pearl upon our coast;
And in these rocks for us did frame
A temple where to sound His name.
Oh! let our voice His praise exalt
Till it arrive at Heaven’s vault,
Which then perhaps rebounding may
Echo beyond the Mexique bay!’
—Thus sung they in the English boat
A holy and a cheerful note:
And all the way, to guide their chime,
With falling oars they kept the time.

 
thePhantom
103967.  Tue Oct 17, 2006 1:17 pm Reply with quote

what a catchy tune :p

 
grizzly
103969.  Tue Oct 17, 2006 1:21 pm Reply with quote

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Bermuda Triangle yet. Is it too obvious?

 
Jumper
107127.  Wed Oct 25, 2006 10:08 pm Reply with quote

Is the worlds smallest lifting bridge still there?

there used to be a bridge between two of the islands that had a plank in the middle that could be lifted to allow the mast of yachts to pass through so the yachts didn't have to lower their masts to get under the bridge.



With regards Golf Courses I remember getting into one as a members guest who explained how the women had their own small seperate clubroom - but were NEVER allowed into the main clubrooms...

 
Cummerbund for Geography
107281.  Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:18 am Reply with quote

grizzly wrote:
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Bermuda Triangle yet. Is it too obvious?


"Bermuda Triangle; try to see it from my angle..."

 
grimwig
107758.  Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:52 am Reply with quote

According to The Last Pink Bits by Harry Ritchie a journalist invented the concept of the bermuda triangle- anyone know any more?

 
BondiTram
107784.  Fri Oct 27, 2006 10:01 am Reply with quote

Was that just before he disappeared?

 
gyunyu
108121.  Sat Oct 28, 2006 5:01 am Reply with quote

I'm not sure about that one i think the first documented case of a ship dissappearing was in 1951 i think, however columbus has said to have seen strange lights on the horizon and weird animals but his ship never sank. I have always been told that methane hydrates were the cause of ships losing adequate bouancy then sinking quickly, however i have no idea how that would effect aircraft. Anyone care to enlighten us?

 
bookworm
108130.  Sat Oct 28, 2006 5:18 am Reply with quote

gyunyu wrote:
I have always been told that methane hydrates were the cause of ships losing adequate bouancy then sinking quickly, however i have no idea how that would effect aircraft. Anyone care to enlighten us?


I also thought that methane hydrates were to blame for ships sinking but the myth about aircraft is mainly that their compas' go crazy and the pilots get disorientated. The earliest account of aircraft being lost to the triangle i could find was Flight 19 but that was later put down to human error.

The earliest case of a ship being lost to the triangle i could find was credited to the U.S.S Cyclops in 1918.

I may well be wrong here so please correct me if i am.

 
gyunyu
108145.  Sat Oct 28, 2006 5:49 am Reply with quote

You could be correct here actually as i remember hearing that when columbus was sailing through he also reported his compass going crazy. as for the USS Cyclops in 1918 I belive the Americans would have been at war then so it is highly probable that it was shot down by another enemy aircraft. I was kind of right as in 1951 was the first mention of ships and aircraft going missing.

 
dr.bob
109035.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:17 am Reply with quote

I recall a debunker of famous mystical things (probably James Randi, as it tends to be) claiming that the Bermuda Triangle actually contains a few square miles of land. He suggested that if there really was something spooky and mystical going on there, surely a few buildings should've gone missing by now.

 
BondiTram
109069.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 7:55 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
I recall a debunker of famous mystical things (probably James Randi, as it tends to be) claiming that the Bermuda Triangle actually contains a few square miles of land. He suggested that if there really was something spooky and mystical going on there, surely a few buildings should've gone missing by now.


Aren't they fastened down though? Maybe that's the difference. Anybody know how campsites have fared?

 
gerontius grumpus
109480.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:31 pm Reply with quote

grizzly wrote:
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Bermuda Triangle yet. Is it too obvious?



What a spooky coincidence that a Bermuda sail is triangular.

 
defenestrator
120396.  Fri Nov 24, 2006 1:34 pm Reply with quote

While the bermuda triangle may sound romantic, the notion of aliens, giant gas bubbles and military conspiracies is all wrong. According to Lloyds registry of shipping (who hold every statistic of every ship ever to hit the water) the area defined as the bermuda triangle contains no more unexplainable dissapearences per unit area than any other region of ocean on the face of the earth. The case of a vanishing squadron of american Avenger aircraft in 1945 was probably down to inexperienced pilots and a navigation error by the instructor. And the USS Cyclops was a coal carrying vessel that was not a ship of the US navy, just their auxilliary service. Coal has always been a very volatile cargo especially when held in large quantities and her disappearance should be considered no different to any other. The tragic truth is that no matter how strong a ship is or how well weather can be predicted the oceans of the world will always be beyond the control of mankind and we should never under any circumstances consider the possibility of taming them.

P.s. the bermuda triangle is often linked to the case of the marie celeste, even though the marie celeste was discovered on the other side of the atlantic, and was not even called the marie celeste. She was 'renamed' from the mary celeste by our greatest detective author sir arther conan doyle himself in a short story not long after the 'celeste's' discovery

 

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