View previous topic | View next topic

NETHERLANDS, The

Page 7 of 8
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

'yorz
1245042.  Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:12 pm Reply with quote

You never know. *shrugs*
Can't be arsed to write to the club directly and ask them what the fuck possessed them.

 
suze
1245044.  Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:39 pm Reply with quote

I can only read Dutch by pretending that it's a mixture of German and English, but it seems to be an homage to a strip cartoon and to have been chosen as the club's name fairly randomly.

From Dutch language Wikipedia:

Quote:
AV Horror '47 is een atletiek- en loopsportvereniging uit de stad Sneek.

De vereniging is opgericht in 1947 en is vernoemd naar het stripfiguur Horror. Dit figuur komt voor in het Tom Poes-verhaal Horror de ademloze van Marten Toonder. De naam is toevallig gekozen; tijdens een van de oprichtingsvergaderingen lag een krant met deze strip op de vergadertafel.

 
'yorz
1245045.  Tue Aug 08, 2017 6:42 pm Reply with quote

Ah. 'Horror the Breathless'. Of course I know Tom Poes, although not this particular story. It still doesn't make sense. *another shrug*

 
Alfred E Neuman
1245199.  Wed Aug 09, 2017 4:09 pm Reply with quote

"Poes" is not a particularly polite word in Afrikaans. Somewhere between twat and cunt in vulgarity, and referring to the same area.

 
'yorz
1245203.  Wed Aug 09, 2017 4:37 pm Reply with quote

For Cloggies, poes is the same as cat. When we call the animal, we'll shout "Poes!", never "Cat!". Unless it just shat on tyour expensive rug, then it becomes "That effing cat of yours!".

 
suze
1245209.  Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:04 pm Reply with quote

So in Afrikaans it equates to the sort of pussy that most of us probably think of first when we hear that word, but in Dutch it equates to the sort of pussy that Mrs Slocombe has.

Comparably, in Afrikaans your kont is your British fanny and really rather rude, but in Dutch it is your American fanny and the sort of word you can use in front of your granny. (Apparently it also has the Afrikaans meaning in Gronings, but not in other dialects spoken in the Netherlands.)

And I though Britain and the US were two countries divided by speaking nearly the same language ...

 
'yorz
1245675.  Tue Aug 15, 2017 2:12 am Reply with quote

I was rather thrown by the fact that nowadays Cloggies put their pets in a bench. It used to be 'kooi' (cage), but for some reason they nowadays use the English word 'bench'. If you don't believe me, just google 'Hond in een bench'. To me, that doesn't make any sense whatsoever.

 
'yorz
1245711.  Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:21 am Reply with quote

Ah - at lest some clarity: apparently, showing your dog at an exhibition is called benching., for which it is put on a bench.


I'd call this a crate (perhaps cage), but not a bench.
What do others think?

 
Dix
1245724.  Tue Aug 15, 2017 12:45 pm Reply with quote

That would be a "show pen" in the cat showing world.

 
crissdee
1245726.  Tue Aug 15, 2017 1:31 pm Reply with quote

It would also be an extremely handsome doggie in my world!

 
'yorz
1245745.  Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:21 am Reply with quote

Dix wrote:
That would be a "show pen" in the cat showing world.

Yes, in an English-speaking country. But I am nonplussed why a country would adopt a foreign word and give it a different meaning. suze - when is bench used in stead of crate?

 
suze
1245765.  Wed Aug 16, 2017 6:09 am Reply with quote

In English, it isn't. That dog container would never be called a bench in English.

But it's by no means unknown for a word from one language to be borrowed into another with a different meaning. You will have been beside a river and seen the red and white rubber rings which are intended to be used for rescuing someone who has fallen in. (They are actually more often used for silly games by inebriated persons, but I digress.)

The French name for that rubber ring is une brassière, but that word found itself a different meaning when it was brought into English.

 
PDR
1245774.  Wed Aug 16, 2017 6:31 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
So in Afrikaans it equates to the sort of pussy that most of us probably think of first when we hear that word, but in Dutch it equates to the sort of pussy that Mrs Slocombe has.


She has both, surely?

Pete

 
'yorz
1245782.  Wed Aug 16, 2017 7:21 am Reply with quote

Poes is also tends to indicate a female cat, while kat (pron kaht) would indicate a male cat, although both words can be used for both. Bit of a preference thing. Kater (pron kaah-ter) is definitely a male cat. It also means hangover, and stems from the German Katzenjammer (cat's wail/caterwaul).

 
suze
1245789.  Wed Aug 16, 2017 8:13 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
She has both, surely?


Fictional characters who keep their clothes on do not have genitalia. A bit like Action Man, or something.

 

Page 7 of 8
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group