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NETHERLANDS, The

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'yorz
1069528.  Fri Apr 18, 2014 9:48 am Reply with quote

Anchor woman? Heaven forbid. Her articulation is shite.

 
knightmare
1069532.  Fri Apr 18, 2014 10:12 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Anchor woman?


Don't worry. She's Claudi Groot Koerkamp, IJsseldelta Marketing, dressed to swim in cold water and ready to be rescued. His role is real, albeit he's acting too.

He also published a picture where you can see what her real job actually is.

 
'yorz
1069533.  Fri Apr 18, 2014 10:36 am Reply with quote

Whatever her day job - she swallows plenty of letters if not words. And that's a problem I have with most Dutch TV nowadays. Lots of mumbling and muttering going on.

 
knightmare
1069541.  Fri Apr 18, 2014 11:26 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Whatever her day job - she swallows plenty of letters if not words. And that's a problem I have with most Dutch TV nowadays. Lots of mumbling and muttering going on.


Some Youtube video isn't Dutch TV, but never mind that. Interestingly I assume she was a TV actress (using the LKow Saxon language), Van Jonge Leu en Oale Groond's teacher, so it could have been a problem. But not in the area where she is probably from, speaking this Low Saxon language and used to swallowing quite a few vowels and other letters (like rock and roll vs. rock 'n roll). Nevertheless your observation may be right indeed. Perhaps it's caused by modern, trendy, sloppy Dutch people using 140 characters, while you're in a perfect position to notice changes.

 
'yorz
1069553.  Fri Apr 18, 2014 12:36 pm Reply with quote

I do, and it's not just me. A Dutch friend of mine who has lived abroad for many years and is now back on Cloggie soil, also struggles to follow quite a lot of what is said in Dutch telly.
I can understand that things change over time, including spoken language. But you cannot convince me that present news readers will win an award from the lipreading part of the population for their visual clarity, like Eugenie Herlaar* once did.

*sorry folks, a bit of Dutch inside info here.

 
knightmare
1075662.  Thu May 22, 2014 1:48 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Don't quite know how I feel about this...

It's Dynasty played entirely with Downs Syndrome actors:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Qh3x39WV4I


The next one will be Down for Dummies. An edited Google translation:

Quote:
It is expected that in the future no children with Down will be born. All the more reason for the real-life soap 'Down for Dummies' that does justice to these special people and takes away prejudices. The presenter is Barry Atsma, whose brother Rimmert has Down.

 
zifnab
1078861.  Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:50 am Reply with quote

Q: Why did Queen Elisabeth II avoid the backside of Charles during her visit to the Netherlands?
A: because of embarrassment

In 1958 during her visit to the Netherlands, Queen Elisabeth II visited the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. In this museum is still the stern of the battleship Royal Charles which the Dutch captured in the harbor of Chatham (https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/NG-MC-239). The tour of the Queen through the museum was changed enough for her not to see the stern of Charles.
Some other interesting facts about this:
- In England it is called the Chatham Raid while in the Netherlands it is known as the Chatham Tour.
- It was initiated after the Holmes bonfire a year earlier (1666) in which 130 merchant ships were burnt together with the village West-Terschelling. The attack on unarmed citizens in West was not appreciated.
- Reasons for the attack were thus: 1. Revenge. 2. Teach the English some manners.
- The Dutch Marine Corps was founded. It was the first unit specialized to attack from the sea to the land. It was used to capture and (demolish?) fort Sheernes.
- A proof of teaching manners was that the Dutch Marines paid for their visit in the bars of Sheernes in stead of just pillaging which was more usual.

 
zifnab
1078863.  Sat Jun 07, 2014 6:05 am Reply with quote

There is something about the Netherlands with which it should be able to make a question about it. As far as I know there are at least 15 different words for a linear bit of man-made water.
You get a different names with different (original) purpose, size, and region.

- kanaal -> canal/channel
- gracht -> fosse
- sloot -> ditch
- vaart -> ditch
- tocht -> big ditch
- ringvaart -> channel around a reclamation area to discharge the water from it
- grift -> channel
- greb -> small channel
- greppel -> ditch
- wetering/watering -> small channel
- spreng -> specially man-made brook to power watermills
- molenbeek -> man-made riverbranch to power watermills
- (hoofd)diep -> (very) large ditch
- wijk -> (very) large ditch
- singel -> channel
- goot -> drain/gutter
- boezem -> channel to discharge water from reclamation areas

 
Jenny
1078897.  Sat Jun 07, 2014 10:06 am Reply with quote

Welcome to the forums, zifnab and thanks for the contributions :-)

 
zifnab
1079205.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 10:20 am Reply with quote

Oh, and I assume the Netherlands is the only country in the world with a special governmental watermanagement body ("waterschap"). In all the countries (as far as I know), it is just one of the many tasks for e.g. a province. In NL the task of water quality and water quantity is at the waterschappen.

They are also among the oldest governmental bodies in NL (starting 1255), because from early on people needed to organize to protect their lands against the water from rivers/sea. To built a dike you need cooperation between several villages.

There used to be thousands of waterschappen, but they combined and now only 24 remain. Smallest among these is by far "Blija Buitendijks", which governs about 100ha of land in the Waddenzee, outside the dikes.

 
zifnab
1079207.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 10:26 am Reply with quote

Borders between provinces are usually based on practice, established after lot of fightings between the different counts/bishops/dukes in the middle ages. The borders between waterschappen are more natural, and are often formed by 'water dividing natural phenomenon'. E.g. a row of hills can create the water on one side is flowing west and on the other side is flowing east. The line of hills can then be a border between two waterschappen.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1079240.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 2:09 pm Reply with quote

zifnab wrote:
Oh, and I assume the Netherlands is the only country in the world with a special governmental watermanagement body ("waterschap"). In all the countries (as far as I know), it is just one of the many tasks for e.g. a province. In NL the task of water quality and water quantity is at the waterschappen.

They are also among the oldest governmental bodies in NL (starting 1255), because from early on people needed to organize to protect their lands against the water from rivers/sea. To built a dike you need cooperation between several villages.

There used to be thousands of waterschappen, but they combined and now only 24 remain. Smallest among these is by far "Blija Buitendijks", which governs about 100ha of land in the Waddenzee, outside the dikes.


Would that be similar to our German Deichverbšnde, i.e. the communal associations looking after the dykes and general coastal protection?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1079268.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 5:50 pm Reply with quote

Another interesting fact is that when the Dutch Tourist Board were having trouble promoting the virtues of the country as a holiday destination they contracted the Watneys brewery as marketing consultants as they were the acknowledged world experts on making money out of stuff which is very close to water...

PDR

 
zifnab
1079618.  Thu Jun 12, 2014 4:19 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
zifnab wrote:
Oh, and I assume the Netherlands is the only country in the world with a special governmental watermanagement body ("waterschap"). In all the countries (as far as I know), it is just one of the many tasks for e.g. a province. In NL the task of water quality and water quantity is at the waterschappen.

They are also among the oldest governmental bodies in NL (starting 1255), because from early on people needed to organize to protect their lands against the water from rivers/sea. To built a dike you need cooperation between several villages.

There used to be thousands of waterschappen, but they combined and now only 24 remain. Smallest among these is by far "Blija Buitendijks", which governs about 100ha of land in the Waddenzee, outside the dikes.


Would that be similar to our German Deichverbšnde, i.e. the communal associations looking after the dykes and general coastal protection?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


I never new they existed! Thank you!

What I read is there is a difference in tasks. As I read it, the Dutch Waterschap has a broader range of tasks then the Deichverbšnde. In NL it has three main jobs:
1. Protection: building dikes etc. (like the Deichverbšnde)
2. Waste quality and waste water purification
3. Water quantity management: make sure that all the ditches have enough but not too much water

and it:
4. Controls and can give fines
5. Collects its own tax

But yes, there is at least a German comparison to be made!

 
AlmondFacialBar
1079660.  Thu Jun 12, 2014 10:04 am Reply with quote

zifnab wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
zifnab wrote:
Oh, and I assume the Netherlands is the only country in the world with a special governmental watermanagement body ("waterschap"). In all the countries (as far as I know), it is just one of the many tasks for e.g. a province. In NL the task of water quality and water quantity is at the waterschappen.

They are also among the oldest governmental bodies in NL (starting 1255), because from early on people needed to organize to protect their lands against the water from rivers/sea. To built a dike you need cooperation between several villages.

There used to be thousands of waterschappen, but they combined and now only 24 remain. Smallest among these is by far "Blija Buitendijks", which governs about 100ha of land in the Waddenzee, outside the dikes.


Would that be similar to our German Deichverbšnde, i.e. the communal associations looking after the dykes and general coastal protection?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


I never new they existed! Thank you!

What I read is there is a difference in tasks. As I read it, the Dutch Waterschap has a broader range of tasks then the Deichverbšnde. In NL it has three main jobs:
1. Protection: building dikes etc. (like the Deichverbšnde)
2. Waste quality and waste water purification
3. Water quantity management: make sure that all the ditches have enough but not too much water

and it:
4. Controls and can give fines
5. Collects its own tax

But yes, there is at least a German comparison to be made!


Ah right. Yes, in Germany these are managed to by two different organisations. The Deichverbšnde look after coastal protection, and the communes look after everything else. As the Deichverbšnde are communal organisations in themselves, they partake in the local authority tax take (though, coastal protection being as expensive as it is, realistically most of their budget these days comes from federal and EU sources).

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 

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