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Jenny
821784.  Sun Jun 05, 2011 1:00 pm Reply with quote

I tried a pack of that Kraft mac and cheese out of curiosity. It was repellent.

 
suze
821790.  Sun Jun 05, 2011 1:19 pm Reply with quote

Damn!

There are any number of arguments which could be put forward for the proposition "Maine's natural home is in Canada". But here you offer a piece of evidence for the counter-assertion that "Maine's natural home is in the USA".

 
sjb
821792.  Sun Jun 05, 2011 1:22 pm Reply with quote

lol :)

 
Jenny
821819.  Sun Jun 05, 2011 2:54 pm Reply with quote

But don't forget I am not a Real Mainer, suze. I know this because I get damn cold in the winter, when Real Mainers are claiming how bracing it is and leaving bedroom windows open.

 
Zebra57
827685.  Wed Jun 29, 2011 6:44 am Reply with quote

Are there still territorial disputes between USA and Canada?

The Machias Seal Island is occupied by a Canadian lighthouse but was claimed as part of Maine. There were other border disputes, are these still pursued today?

 
Jenny
827743.  Wed Jun 29, 2011 10:43 am Reply with quote

I'll ask Woodsman to comment on that one, Zebra - he'll know.

 
Woodsman
827767.  Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:34 am Reply with quote

Quote:
"Maine's natural home is in Canada". But here you offer a piece of evidence for the counter-assertion that "Maine's natural home is in the USA".


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aroostook_War

Quote:
The Machias Seal Island is occupied by a Canadian lighthouse but was claimed as part of Maine. There were other border disputes, are these still pursued today?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machias_Seal_Island

Both cases result from poorly drawn and/or poorly worded descriptions of borders, or no descriptions at all. The first was problem was initiated in the 18th century, the latter in the 20th. In the current instance, US fishermen wanted to control virtually the whole of the Gulf of Maine, in which MSI sits. The US and Canada sent the issue to the international court for resolution and were given a decision on the seaward boundary, but the countries failed to allow the inshore boundary to be defined. So, MSI sits in a no mans land of sorts.


Last edited by Woodsman on Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:46 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Woodsman
827768.  Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:41 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Spent Canada Day in Quebec (city) and found the Canadians to be festive, friendly and hospitable people.


Wow! In la cite de Quebec celebrating Canada Day?

 
Woodsman
827802.  Wed Jun 29, 2011 2:09 pm Reply with quote

Further to the MSI question:

http://www.icj-cij.org/docket/index.php?sum=346&code=cigm&p1=3&p2=3&case=67&k=6f&p3=5

Go to ‘Judgements’, ‘Judgement of 12 October 1984’, ‘PDF 13 MB’, Page 205 for map. Zoom in. Point ‘A’ is on the north end of the ICJ established boundary. Continuing an imaginary line NNE, which the US and Canada kept out of the judgement, lands on or almost on MSI.

http://www.siue.edu/GEOGRAPHY/ONLINE/1925.jpg

MSI is virtually the same distance from Maine and Grand Manan Island (Canada).

They should quit squabbling over it and just make it an international wildlife sanctuary with the seabirds and whales going by.

 
Woodsman
827837.  Wed Jun 29, 2011 4:48 pm Reply with quote

With a bit more research regarding the MSI question, there is this information.

http://www.internationalboundarycommission.org/history.html

See item (m)

From the records of the IBC NAD 27 at http://www.internationalboundarycommission.org/products.html

there appears to be an undefined gap between:

Passamaquoddy Bay southerly end point TP 15, 44˚46’ 35.3” N 66˚54’ 11.2” W

and:

Gulf of Maine northerly end point TP A, 44˚11’ 12” N 67˚16’ 46” W

Machias Seal Island at 44˚30’ 10” N 67˚06’ 10” W (and North Rock) are between these two points.

If this goes beyond your needs, I'll desist from further posts.

 
eralakiy
849622.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 1:07 am Reply with quote

Canadian paper currency has braille on it so each bills worth may be identified by people who have trouble with vision.

Canadians drink more fruit juice per capita then anywhere else in the world. About 52.6 litres each per year. Canadians are followed by the people of the USA who drink 42.8 litres per person every year. And then Germans who each drink an average of 38.6 litres.

Snorri, the first North American child to be born of European parents (Thorfin and Gudrid), was born in Vinland around A.D. 1000.

The Sasquatch is from Canada.

Winnie-the-Pooh was inspired by a bear from Canada.
After the death of her mother, a female Canadian black bear was picked up by a Canadian regiment on their way to the Western Front during WW2.
She was named Winnipeg (Winnie for short), after the hometown of the regiments veterinarian, and was smuggled into Britain as an unofficial mascot for the regiment.
She was left at the London zoo as the regiment was shipped off to France where A. A. Milne's son Christopher Robin met her and named his stuffed toy after her.
In addition to her connection to Winnie-the-Pooh she has her own movie 'A Bear Named Winnie' which tells the story of her life.

JUST NOTING:

The dead bodies thing is partially true and partially false.
It is unlikely to happen in populated areas as there are laws and common sense that would prevent others from allowing a person to fall asleep in snow.
It is more common in rural areas, in forests, and on mountains.
People ranging from tourists who can't be bothered to do research to people who are just really unlucky unfortunately don't often win against nature.
Something wont be accounted for during a trip like hurricanes, avalanches, or bears and soon the body count is high enough that it is inevitable people stumble across something unfortunate.
Of course when someone goes missing search teams are sent out to try to find anyone or their remains, but even if what forest they got lost in can be identified that may still leave thousands of km2.

That being said, do your research stick to a place meant for tourists and you'll be safe. The people who die are usually the ones that thought it a good idea to go wander desolate areas without a guide who knows what they're doing while it is −40 °C.


Hopefully someone finds this interesting :)

 
Moosh
849697.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 6:42 am Reply with quote

eralakiy wrote:
Canadian paper currency has braille on it so each bills worth may be identified by people who have trouble with vision.

Putting braille on them seems rather a lot of trouble to go to compared to the British practice of just making the banknotes different sizes, so you can easily tell them apart by touch.

Although at least the Canadian ones are different colours, US currency does my head in whenever I'm there, every denomination is the same colour and size, ridiculous country.

 
'yorz
849717.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 7:45 am Reply with quote

Features for visually impared

Quote:
Specific Engraved Visible Marks
The use of intaglio printing on currency has long been regarded as a way of providing a tactile feature for blind people. This assumption is based on the fact that blind people use touch to identify the raised characteristics of braille. Since intaglio itself is a three-dimensional printing process, specific identifiers can be included to separate each denomination. The marks have taken the form of small geometric shapes that form different groupings and locations for each denomination. In practice there is a large difference between the relief of an average braille dot above the paper surface (approximately 400 µm) and that of the typical intaglio marks (approximately 40-50 µm). During the course of a banknote's circulated life, as the note becomes worn, the level of the mark's profile becomes reduced. Examples of tactile marks can be seen on the currencies of Germany, the Netherlands, and Malaysia. The survey (Table D-1) indicated that around 16 countries have adopted this approach for each denomination, and a further 7 have a tactile feature on some denominations.

Current thinking in the banknote manufacturing community is that the marks are an attempt to provide a feature useful to visually impaired people, but in practice they are only evident to the normally sighted. Currency design is moving toward the inclusion of large numerals or special shaped patterns.


Braille on Dutch banknotes has been used for a very long time.

 
Jenny
849789.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 12:25 pm Reply with quote

Welcome eralakiy and thanks for that contribution :-)

 
suze
849836.  Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:56 pm Reply with quote

eralakiy wrote:
Canadian paper currency has braille on it so each bills worth may be identified by people who have trouble with vision.


In fact, the bumps for tactile reading on Canadian bills are not Braille. Because currency bills get handled quite a lot, and Braille would be misread if even one bump wore off, a different system is used.

In one corner, there appear up to four full blocks of six bumps. If only one block appears, then it's a $5 bill. Two blocks together for $10, three blocks for $20, four blocks for $50, and two blocks with a space between for $100.

While Canadian bills - like US bills - are all the same size, they are not all the same colour. In increasing order, the five denominations are blue, purple, green, red, and brown, as they have been since 1937. Back in my day we also had $2 (a rather fecal orange/brown colour) and $1,000 (pink), but these denominations are no longer printed.

 

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