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Zebra57
816288.  Sat May 14, 2011 8:38 pm Reply with quote

I read that in 1920 the whole of Canada adopted driving on the right. I know that Newfoundland changed after 1949 but what was the situation prior to 1920?

 
suze
816374.  Sun May 15, 2011 8:30 am Reply with quote

Which side one should drive on was considered a provincial matter in Canada, so each province made its own decision. Ontario always drove on the right (because the USA did), and so did Québec (because France did).

British Columbia switched to the right in 1920, and the Maritimes then followed within a few years - I think Prince Edward Island was the last, in 1924. Newfoundland didn't become part of Canada until 1949, but it switched in 1947.

In Britain, there is a brand of non-PC humour based around the premise that Irish people are stupid. In Canada, the butt of that sort of humour is Newfoundland. And there was a popular joke that, in order to ease the transition to driving on the other side, the switch would be phased. People with surnames starting with A would switch one day, surnames starting with B the next day, and so on ...

 
Zebra57
816549.  Sun May 15, 2011 6:14 pm Reply with quote

Thanks Suze for the information. The are many examples of "butts of that kind of humour". In Germany the butt of jokes are the East Freisland Islanders. I assume like the Nufies it is because they are isolated and are seen to have a simple uncomplicated lifestyle.

 
sjb
816560.  Sun May 15, 2011 7:59 pm Reply with quote

My grandmother was East Frisian and so my cousin has filled me in on how they're the butt of jokes. It's sad. I think East Frisians are da bomb! :) Plus--they're tea drinkers. Can't beat that with a stick. Not to mention their long history of democracy. Yeah!

Or have I just been brain-washed to love one-quarter of my ancestors? :P

 
Hans Mof
816644.  Mon May 16, 2011 9:03 am Reply with quote

You can't but love East Frisians (and Frisians in general). Tall, handsome, very aware of their culture and heritage while never bothering to claim territory in the past 500 years.

 
tetsabb
817111.  Tue May 17, 2011 10:16 pm Reply with quote

Hans Mof wrote:
You can't but love East Frisians (and Frisians in general). Tall, handsome, very aware of their culture and heritage while never bothering to claim territory in the past 500 years.


 
'yorz
817844.  Fri May 20, 2011 3:29 pm Reply with quote

Tall, handsome and well-hung.

 
Spud McLaren
817846.  Fri May 20, 2011 3:35 pm Reply with quote

And with uncharacteristically well-groomed tails.

 
'yorz
817849.  Fri May 20, 2011 3:47 pm Reply with quote

*cough* Characteristically well-groomed tails! <glares>

 
Spud McLaren
817853.  Fri May 20, 2011 3:57 pm Reply with quote

I was referring to the bovine Frisians (as illustrated), not the other sort.

 
'yorz
817855.  Fri May 20, 2011 4:01 pm Reply with quote

So was I :)

 
Sherbrooke
821469.  Sat Jun 04, 2011 4:05 am Reply with quote

Having visited Canada recently I wondered if there was such a thing as Canadian cuisine.

I had something called Poutine, which was probably my calorie ration for a month!!! Bacon and maple syrup was an interesting combination.

I found myself in Montreal and was craving a steak pie - can't be done. You have to go as far west as Toronto to find something even resembling a pie!!

Spent Canada Day in Quebec (city) and found the Canadians to be festive, friendly and hospitable people. (The ones I met anyway).

 
Jenny
821561.  Sat Jun 04, 2011 12:48 pm Reply with quote

Bacon and maple syrup are commonly found together in Maine too - in fact Denny's here is currently advertising a maple and bacon ice cream sundae, which is definitely a step too far for me.

 
nitwit02
821634.  Sat Jun 04, 2011 8:39 pm Reply with quote

very popular breakfast here is bacon, pancakes and maple syrup.
Excellent!!
Another good choice is eggs and steak ...

 
suze
821698.  Sun Jun 05, 2011 7:51 am Reply with quote

To me, the two foods which define Canadian cuisine are i) macaroni and cheese (specifically the Kraft Dinner, which is actually an American product but is marketed largely to the Canadian market) and ii) the donut.

Most of my adult life in Canada was spent being a student. This may be relevant here!

 

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