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Glass

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Jawr256
131719.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 5:21 am Reply with quote

The proof for glass being a solid in the Book is still not enough for some people I know. Does anyone have any further proof with which I can squash their doubts?

 
Lucwhostalking
131754.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 8:46 am Reply with quote

Smash some on their head and ask if liquids hurt that much?

 
mr-cammy
131826.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 2:39 pm Reply with quote

Nice idea ><

 
Jawr256
131863.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 4:19 pm Reply with quote

I'm not one for violence though

 
Amie
132264.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 9:12 am Reply with quote

Having not yet read the book I don't know what proof is given already, but I did find this: MadSci Network

 
smiley_face
132268.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 9:29 am Reply with quote

If you drop molten glass into a bucket of hot water, it solidifies into a droplet shape. If you hit the "head" of this with a hammer, it will withstand it, but if you hit the "tail", then it shatters into gazillions of pieces. Why is this?

 
samivel
132301.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 10:51 am Reply with quote

I've no idea, but I'd be interested to know why you're dropping molten glass into buckets of hot water in the first place.

 
Amie
132310.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 11:07 am Reply with quote

The droplet shaped pieces of glass are called 'Prince Rupert's Drops,' or 'Rupert's Balls.'
There's a short Wikipedia article here.

 
mr-cammy
132340.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 1:19 pm Reply with quote

But aren't droplets all spherical?
Or is that just rain?

 
Amie
132363.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:06 pm Reply with quote

I supposed tear shaped would have been more appropiate than droplet shaped!

 
smiley_face
132403.  Mon Jan 08, 2007 3:10 pm Reply with quote

OK! Sorry! lol

Thanks for the article Amie, that's just what I was looking for.

 
smiley_face
137739.  Mon Jan 22, 2007 12:57 pm Reply with quote

If you take a sheet of glass deep enough underwater, you can cut it with a pair of shears. The reason glass shatters when you try to cut it in air is that vibrations spread through the material, and while underwater, the water dampens these vibrations.

There's various sources on the web that I found. Not too sure of their reliability. Here's one.

 

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