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Jumper
106550.  Tue Oct 24, 2006 4:05 pm Reply with quote

smiley_face wrote:
I remember being told about the Maori concept of Mana by someone. It's supposed to be some measure of status I think. Does anyone know more on this?


In English Mana is defined as authority, control, influence, prestige or power. It is also honour.

Under Maori Tikanga or custom there are traditionally three kinds of Mana.

1. The Mana a person is born with. - ie the mana that comes from your whakapapa or your genealogy. This could be the rank of your parents, grandparents, great-grandparents. It can also be mana from being a descendant of Tupuna (ancestors) who are well known for their deeds. Some Whanau (families) are known for certain skills, traits and abilities which comes from their tupuna (similar to how today there are families who are known for their sporting abilities.


2. The Mana that people give you. - This is the recognition that people give for your deeds and actions. Just because a person is born from great lines does not necessarily mean that they will have great mana amongst the people. The mana a person is born with sets them off, but the way that they conduct themselves throughout their life will either strengthen or weaken their own personal mana - and in so doing reflect on the mana of their tupuna. A very highly valued trait in the Maori world is humbleness, which has been demonstrated by many great Maori leaders. The people sing their praises (literally in Maori culture - the use of song is very strong) and in singing their praises heighten their mana. These great leaders will never sing their own praises - it is not a case of them trying to be humble - it is that they just are.


3. Group Mana. This is the mana that a group has, for example the mana of a marae (meeting place). You could liken it to the mana of a sporting team (the All Blacks spring to mind for some reason).
Group mana is often enhanced by the mana given to you. When people stay on a marae, are well looked after and are given great food, those manuhiri (guests) when they leave will tell everyone about the great experience, how well they were looked after and the great food, which builds the mana of the marae and the tangata whenua (local people) there. On the other hand if your team plays badly and shows disrespect towards the supporters they will moan and complain about their team and the teams mana would go down.


Today there are people who seek mana and deliberately go around trying to gain mana by telling people about their own importance.
There is a Maori saying:
The Kumera ( a sweet potato) does not talk about its' own sweetness. - But mana seekers do exactly that.

 
Tas
106716.  Wed Oct 25, 2006 4:32 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I thought we'd already ascertained that cows are responsible!


That's just a load of hot air and bullsh!t that's been spread around..

I'll get me coat...

:-)

Tas

 
Jumper
107120.  Wed Oct 25, 2006 9:44 pm Reply with quote

Providing a link now between Maori, TV, New Zealand and Canada....

A few years ago when Maori Television was trying to get set up they were looking for someone to be their first Chief Executive they appointed a Canadian John Davy. However a report in the New Zealand Herald showed that John Davy had actually falsified his CV and as a result was jailed for 3 months before being escorted out of the country.

 
Jumper
107125.  Wed Oct 25, 2006 9:56 pm Reply with quote

Want another Canadian link - again to do with broadcasting???

TV3 and Channel 4 in New Zealand and a host of NZ radio stations are all owned by Canadian media group CanWest.

The CanWest Global Group is a group of leading international media companies, and Canada's largest integrated media company. The market capitalisation of the group's equity as at 14 May 2004 was approximately NZ$2.3 billion.

CanWest MediaWorks NZ is operating in New Zealand under two commercial arms "TVWorks" and "Radioworks"

TVWorks operates TV3 and C4 from network premises in Auckland, with sales offices and news bureaus in Wellington and Christchurch, sales offices in Hamilton, Melbourne and Sydney, and a news bureau in Dunedin. Both TV3 & C4 are major players in the New Zealand television landscape. TV3 is aimed at the 18-49 market, while C4 is a music channel.

RadioWorks has a network of over 140 frequencies throughout New Zealand, including 6 Network Brands The Edge, Kiwi, The Rock, Solid Gold, Radio Live and Radio Pacific. RadioWorks also operates 21 live and local stations broadcasting under the More FM brand and 6 local stations broadcasting as The Breeze. RadioWorks has over 1.2 million listeners tuning into one of our stations each week.


On a more basic level TV3 is New Zealands home of The Simpsons...

 
Jumper
108061.  Fri Oct 27, 2006 11:42 pm Reply with quote

A QI link list.......


What links the following???


Maori
Oranges
Crows
Ronnie Barker
ITV

 
Jenny
108238.  Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:38 am Reply with quote

Excellent stuff there Jumper!

 
Jumper
108474.  Sun Oct 29, 2006 4:43 am Reply with quote

Thank you Jenny.

So anyone got any idea with the list?

What if it was added to...


What links the following???


Maori
Oranges
Crows
Ronnie Barker
ITV
Dog
Coca-Cola

 
Jumper
108978.  Sun Oct 29, 2006 11:00 pm Reply with quote

OK it's time for us all to have a lesson in speaking Maori

the way it was described to me was that the Maori language consists of 'Sounds' and 'Flavours'.

The 'sounds' equate to our vowelsie:-

A as in car
E as in eh
I as in ski
O as in core
U as in eugh ie ooo

About the only variation to those is one with a line over the top which gives it a longer sound.


The flavours that are added to the sounds are the letters H, K, M, N, P, R, T, W, NG and WH (The Maori alphabet has no letters B, C, D, F, J, Q, S, V, X, Y, or Z).


The words are then split up into parts that always finish with a 'sound' (or vowel) eg TIMARU would be Ti/ma/ru and would sound like Teemar-roo, ie with 3 syllables.

Further down the caost we would come to Oamaru - O/a/ma/ru

The only time you come across a syllable of 3 letters is NG (as in hanger) and WH which is given an F sound (as in far). Whangarei therefore would be pronounced Farngar-reh-ee.

Whakapapa = Wha/ka/pa/pa ends up sounding quite rude !!

So equipped with that you should be able to attempt..

"TE MANU E KAI ANA I TE MIRO NONA TE NGAHERE

TE MANU E KAI ANA I TE MATAURAKA NONA TE AO"

The bird that partakes of the Miro berry owns the forest,
the bird that partakes of education owns the world"



(And finally we have the old chestnut - the maori word for 'Car aerial' is Ko/ta/nga...)

 
Not a Number
108982.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 12:03 am Reply with quote

Jumper wrote:

What links the following???


Maori
Oranges
Crows
Ronnie Barker
ITV
Dog
Coca-Cola


Ooh! Me sir! Me! Me!

Umm.... Kia Ora?

The ad for Kia Ora - a beverage- can be seen at the link below
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sB3R9cosCQ

 
Jumper
109310.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 3:58 pm Reply with quote

Yes - well done Not a Number...

The answer is indeed Kia Ora.

In Maori Kia Ora is a form of greeting

The Coca-Cola company (under licence from Atlantic Industries) on the other hand take oranges and proceed to add all sorts of fancy (and not so fancy) chemicals to them to end up with an orangy drink they called Kia Ora

On ITV (and in cinemas) Kia Ora was advertised in a variety of ways - probably one of the most remembered was the one N-a-N provided the link to with the boy and his dog walking along where the crows ( who are citrus intolerant BTW) want to share his Kia Ora - "..But it's too orangy for crows" - he replies - "it's just for me and my dog"... To which the crows respond "I'll be your dog .. woof-woof"

And Ronnie Barker...???

Well in another series of adverts you'd be sitting in the cinema when the ad you were watching would suddenly stop and the picture melt ( as was wont to happen from time to time) and Ronnie Barker's voiceover said "We'd like to apologise for this break in the film but Eric your projectionist is too busy enjoying a nice refreshing Kia Ora orange drink - now available,..."

 
Jenny
109466.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:22 pm Reply with quote

Jumper - what does Timaru mean? One of my uncles lived in a house which had that on a name plaque outside, but it was there when they moved in so they didn't know what it meant.

 
Jumper
109503.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:47 pm Reply with quote

Timaru is a small town on the east caost of the South Island of NZ. It has a port, a railway line ( no passinger trains anymore though) and has amongst it's nearby "Famous sons" Richard Pearce (disputed to have flown BEFORE the Wright Brothers) and Phar Lap - a world winning racehorse that the Australians try and claim as their own.

The origin of the name 'Timaru' is disputed . Some believe that it derives from Māori Te Maru, which can mean a 'place of shelter'. However, other authorities allege that Timaru originates from a literal translation of the combination of ti, a cabbage tree and maru, meaning 'shady'.

Most people favour the "place of shelter" meaning, as Timaru was originally a haven for weary Maori travellers canoeing along the otherwise shelterless coastline. Briefly settled as a whaling station about 1838 by the Sydney-based Weller Brothers, Timaru was sparsely populated until 1859 when the English ship, Strathallan, arrived with 120 immigrants. Development of an artificial harbour was begun in 1877, but ships continued to be wrecked in the bay into the next decade. As moles were extended from the landing service, sand began to fill the rocky beach to the north, making it a popular summer resort. In 1876, the first steam train puffed into Timaru's railway station.

The northern beach (Caroline Bay) is the scene for an annual carnival every year just after Christmas - the kids love it - and older family members always enjoy the free concerts at the sound-shell, with often some of NZ's top performers appearing.

 
samivel
109516.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:57 pm Reply with quote

Jumper wrote:
Phar Lap - a world winning racehorse that the Australians try and claim as their own.



Is it literally true that Phar Lap won the world? That's a big prize.

Seriously, though, your posts on this thread have been chock-full of QI stuff, and very entertaining. Thank you.

 
Jumper
109537.  Mon Oct 30, 2006 7:13 pm Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
Jumper wrote:
Phar Lap - a world winning racehorse that the Australians try and claim as their own.



Is it literally true that Phar Lap won the world? That's a big prize.


Ifyou listen to many Australians, samivel, they would have you believe that to be true...


(My pleasure, always nice to get feedback).

 
suze
109852.  Tue Oct 31, 2006 11:12 am Reply with quote

Jumper wrote:
The only time you come across a syllable of 3 letters is NG (as in hanger) and WH which is given an F sound (as in far). Whangarei therefore would be pronounced Farngar-reh-ee.


There was a bit of discussion in Gabbly yesterday about why they chose WH to represent the /f/ sound, when F is unused in the language. Having had a bit of time to look things up, I think I can now answer that question.

The /f/ pronunciation is in fact a modern development, apparently influenced by English. The original standard Maori pronunciation of the sound was /φ/ [Greek letter phi, for anyone who can't see it] - this is made by blowing through rounded lips and is not a speech sound in English, so it's easy enough to see how it evolved to /f/.

But this still doesn't explain why it's spelled WH. For that we must go back to the earliest European contact with Maori people. That seems to have been in the North Shore area, close to Auckland. The people of North Shore have a regional accent, and pronounce this sound in a different way. Their pronunciation of it is represented in IPA as /ʍ/ [an upside down w for those who can't see it]. That's the sound which many Scots and some older English people make when pronouncing words such as "white", and is the reason for the WH spelling being adopted.

 

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