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samivel
102685.  Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:00 am Reply with quote

Come on, Australian folk, fight back against the calumny heaped upon you by the no-vowel people to the east!

 
Lumpo31
102694.  Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:29 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
Come on, Australian folk, fight back against the calumny heaped upon you by the no-vowel people to the east!


'cept that it's been said by BondiTram, an honourary Aussie, and myself, an Aussie abroad (or is that an Aussie Broad Abroad?)...

Having said that, I don't imbibe, and I reckon that there'd be more drunken GB folk (if the papers are to be believed) than drunken Aussies. I guess the Noo Z'l'nd'ez probably drink about the same as the Aussies; but that's just a guess.

There - I've said it!

Lisa

 
samivel
102824.  Fri Oct 13, 2006 9:31 am Reply with quote

Lumpo31 wrote:
samivel wrote:
Come on, Australian folk, fight back against the calumny heaped upon you by the no-vowel people to the east!


'cept that it's been said by BondiTram, an honourary Aussie, and myself, an Aussie abroad (or is that an Aussie Broad Abroad?)...



Oh well, fairy nuff then.

 
BondiTram
103417.  Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:22 pm Reply with quote

Jumper wrote:
I felt the key part of your message was a bit too subtle (Especially for any Auzzies !!!) so took the liberty of making it large enough for them to read - poor things have enough trouble as it is...


That's torn it, it was small because I was trying to keep out of trouble, but perhaps in this thread of national stereotypes I was really thinking about the short-sighted Japanese.

Or is it the Chinese....?

 
Jumper
103463.  Sun Oct 15, 2006 4:26 pm Reply with quote

Ahem....Time I think to put this thread back on topic, New Zealand, Aotearoa, Land of the Long White Cloud...

(and we won't make any mention of the latest defeat of the Kiwi's by the Auzzies in the Rugby League - but we might mention the netballers winning to square up their test !!)

So to get back onto topic...

The Treaty of Waitangi

Signed in 1840, the Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement between the British Crown and Maori. It established British law in New Zealand, while at the same time guaranteeing Maori authority over their land and culture. The Treaty is considered New Zealandís founding document.

One interesting snippet that was buried in last weeks papers was an article which was about a group of Maori who think that under the Treaty they are entitled to British Pensions, and have lodged a claim for overdue payments.

I don't think that this is the same group who are claiming sovereignty rights over Lake Taupo in the North Island, including all space above it. They have even put in a claim to NASA demanding payment for every satellite that passes over their lake !!

 
Jumper
103811.  Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:03 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
(and we won't make any mention of the latest defeat of the Kiwi's by the Auzzies in the Rugby League - but we might mention the netballers winning to square up their test !!)


Me and my big mouth ... the final in the "Fisher & Paykel Cup" was held in Christchurch last night and Australia won 46-40..:(

Todays NZ snippet concerns a politician so you have my permission to skip the rest of this post and go onto the one below...

Winston Peters is currently the Minister of Foreign Affairs in the Labour led parliament under Helen Clarke, this despite the fact that he lost his electorate seat in the 2005 election.

First unsuccessfully running for Parliament in 1975 as a National (conservatives) Party nominee, Winston Peters was successful in entering Parliament as a National MP - but only after winning in the High Court an electoral petition which overturned the election night result for the seat of Hunua (an electorate in the Auckland Area). He lost this seat in 1981 but in 1984 managed to sucessfully stand in Tauranga. He became the National Party's spokesperson on Māori Affairs, Consumer Affairs, and Transport and, after National won the 1990 elections he became the Minister of Māori Affairs in the government of Jim Bolger.

However Peters regularly and spectacularly disagreed with his party bosses resulting in being sacked from his Ministerial role a year later. He remained an outspoken National backbencher constantly criticising the party, so much so that in late 1992 the party decided they would not let him stand as the National candidate in the next elections. After unsuccessfully challenging this decision in the High Court Peters resigned from the party and from Parliament prompting a by-election in Tauranga only a few months before the next national elections were due. He stood as an independent and won easily, forming his own party New Zealand First.

The 1996 elections in New Zealand were the first under the MMP electoral system and Winston Peters and NZFirst won 17 seats
finding that it held the balance of power in Parliament. Neither National nor Labour had enough support to govern alone. Winston Peters was dubbed the 'Kingmaker' because neither party could form a majority without the backing of New Zealand First, meaning Peters could effectively choose the next prime minister.

After all the time he had spent criticising National it was widely expected that he would support the Labour Party and make Labour leader Helen Clark New Zealand's first female prime minister. A large majority of voters who supported New Zealand First backed Labour in the party vote, suggesting overwelming support within NZFirst to form a coalition government with Labour.

Peters next appeared to 'hold the country to ransom' for 7 weeks while he negotiated with both parties to get the best deal for himself. Eventually he decided - to stick with his old party. Peters exacted a high price for allowing Bolger to stay on as prime minister - Peters became Deputy Prime Minister and Treasurer (senior to the Minister of Finance), the latter post created especially for him.

Later, however, tensions began to develop between Peters and the National Party, which only worsened after Jenny Shipley staged a party room coup and became prime minister. After a dispute over the privatization of Auckland International Airport, Peters was sacked from Cabinet again on 14 August 1998. He immediately broke off the coaltion and led New Zealand First back into opposition.

The 1999 elections resulted in Labour winning and NZFirst's portion of the party vote dropped to 4.3%. This would have given NZ First no seats in Parliament had Peters not (just) managed to hold onto his electorate seat in Tauranga. This, under MMP rules meant that NZFirst got 5 seats. While in opposition Winston continued to promote his traditional policies, but also became more noticeably more concerned about immigration policies.

Campaigning on the main issues of reducing immigration, increasing punishments for crime, and ending the "grievance industry" around Treaty of Waitangi settlements in the 2002 election, Winston Peters performed well once again, winning 10% of the vote and 13 seats.

Despite hoping that Labour would choose to ally with New Zealand First in order to stay in power. Winston found himself rejected by Helen Clark, who managed to find sufficient support elsewhere.

The 2005 general election Peters declared that he would not seek the "baubles of office". In the election, New Zealand First fared badly with Peters himself narrowly lost his supposedly unbreakable hold on Tauranga, but New Zealand First did well enough to receive seven seats so Peters was able to remain in parliament as a list MP.

This time Helen Clarke and the Labour Party did seek a coalition with NZFirst and Peters secured the ministerial portfolios of Foreign Affairs and Racing, although he is outside cabinet. Considering his previous comments relating to immigration, there were mixed reactions from overseas commentators.

Winston Peters has recently affirmed that he is willing to continue as leader of NZFirst for the 2008 elections but there are rumblings within his party about him being an absentee leader.

 
Jumper
103812.  Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:06 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Todays NZ snippet concerns a politician so you have my permission to skip the rest of this post and go onto the one below...


For those of you that took this option I don't think you missed much !!!

 
Celebaelin
103813.  Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:15 pm Reply with quote

Racing?

 
BondiTram
103857.  Tue Oct 17, 2006 6:09 am Reply with quote

Yes, Foreign Affairs and Racing. I love that.
Presumably it involves making sure there is only one race in New Zealand, or outside of it, or......?

 
Jumper
104081.  Tue Oct 17, 2006 11:31 pm Reply with quote

For your deliberation and delectation - here is the full list of NZ Ministers and their Portfolios...



Ministers of the Crown are appointed by the Governor-General on the advice of the Prime Minister and must be Members of Parliament.

Collectively they form the executive arm of government whose principal decision-making body is Cabinet which is chaired by the Prime Minister.

All major decisions are taken through the Cabinet process and Cabinet meetings are confidential.
Ministers have specific areas of responsibility called "portfolios" and may be assisted in these by Deputy or Associate Ministers or Parliamentary Under-Secretaries.

All Ministers are members of the Executive Council which is the highest formal instrument of government and is the institution through which the government as a whole advises the Governor-General, normally by recommendations to make Orders in Council. Apart from Acts of Parliament, Orders in Council are the main method of implementing government decisions requiring legal force.




THE CABINET


Portfolios / Other responsibilities


1 Rt Hon Helen Clark

Prime Minister
Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage
Ministerial Services
Minister in Charge of the NZ Security Intelligence Service
Minister Responsible for the GCSB

2 Hon Dr Michael Cullen

Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Finance
Minister for Tertiary Education
Attorney-General
[Includes responsibility for Serious Fraud Office]
Leader of the House

3 Hon Jim Anderton

Minister of Agriculture
Minister for Biosecurity
Minister of Fisheries
Minister of Forestry
Minister Responsible for the Public Trust
Associate Minister of Health
Associate Minister for Tertiary Education

4 Hon Steve Maharey

Minister of Education
Minister of Broadcasting
Minister of Research, Science and Technology
Minister for Crown Research Institutes
Minister Responsible for the Education Review Office

5 Hon Phil Goff

Minister of Defence
Minister for Trade Negotiations
Minister of Trade
Minister of Pacific Island Affairs
Minister for Disarmament and Arms Control
Associate Minister of Finance

6 Hon Annette King

Minister of State Services
Minister of Police
Minister of Transport
Minister for Food Safety

7 Hon Trevor Mallard

Minister for Economic Development
Minister for Industry and Regional Development
Minister for State Owned Enterprises
Minister for Sport and Recreation
Associate Minister of Finance
Minister for the Rugby World Cup

8 Hon Pete Hodgson

Minister of Health

9 Hon Parekura Horomia

Minister of Maori Affairs
Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment
Associate Minister of Education
Associate Minister of State Services
Associate Minister of Fisheries

10 Hon Mark Burton

Minister of Justice
Minister of Local Government
Minister in Charge of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations
Deputy Leader of the House
Minister Responsible for the Law Commission

11 Hon Ruth Dyson

Minister of Labour
Minister for ACC
Minister for Senior Citizens
Minister for Disability Issues
Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment (CYF)

12 Hon Chris Carter

Minister of Conservation
Minister of Housing
Minister for Ethnic Affairs

13 Hon Rick Barker

Minister of Internal Affairs
Minister of Civil Defence
Minister for Courts
Minister of Veteransí Affairs

14 Hon David Benson-Pope

Minister for Social Development and Employment
Minister for the Environment

15 Hon Lianne Dalziel

Minister of Commerce
Minister of Womenís Affairs
Minister for Small Business

16 Hon Damien OíConnor

Minister of Corrections
Minister of Tourism
Minister for Rural Affairs
Associate Minister of Health

17 Hon David Cunliffe

Minister of Immigration
Minister of Communications
Minister for Information Technology
Associate Minister for Economic Development

18 Hon David Parker

Minister of Energy
Minister for Land Information
Minister Responsible for Climate Change Issues

19 Hon Nanaia Mahuta

Minister of Customs
Minister of Youth Affairs
Associate Minister for the Environment
Associate Minister of Local Government

20 Hon Clayton Cosgrove

Minister for Building Issues
Minister of Statistics
Associate Minister of Finance
Associate Minister of Immigration
Associate Minister of Justice


MINISTERS OUTSIDE CABINET

21 Hon Judith Tizard

Minister of Consumer Affairs
Minister Responsible for Archives New Zealand
Minister Responsible for the National Library
Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage
Associate Minister of Commerce
Associate Minister of Transport
Auckland Issues

22 Hon Dover Samuels

Minister of State
Associate Minister for Economic Development
Associate Minister for Industry and Regional Development
Associate Minister of Housing
Associate Minister of Tourism

23 Hon Harry Duynhoven

Minister for Transport Safety
Associate Minister of Energy

24 Hon Mita Ririnui

Minister of State
Associate Minister of Corrections
Associate Minister in Charge of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations
Associate Minister of Forestry
Associate Minister of Health

25 Hon Luamanuvao Winnie Laban

Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector
Associate Minister of Pacific Island Affairs
Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment
Associate Minister for Economic Development

26 Hon Mahara Okeroa

Minister of State
Associate Minister for Social Development and Employment
Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage
Associate Minister of Conservation


MINISTERS OUTSIDE CABINET FROM OTHER PARTIES WITH CONFIDENCE AND SUPPLY AGREEMENTS

Rt Hon Winston Peters

Minister of Foreign Affairs
Minister for Racing
Associate Minister for Senior Citizens


Hon Peter Dunne

Minister of Revenue
Associate Minister of Health

 
Jumper
104259.  Wed Oct 18, 2006 9:44 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
18 Hon David Parker

Minister of Energy
Minister for Land Information
Minister Responsible for Climate Change Issues



So now you know who to blame for Climate Changes...

 
samivel
104469.  Thu Oct 19, 2006 1:40 pm Reply with quote

Wow, aren't there a lot of people called 'Hon' in New Zealand...

 
Jumper
105441.  Sun Oct 22, 2006 9:22 pm Reply with quote

Yes there are, 'Dear'...

 
smiley_face
105551.  Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:47 am Reply with quote

I remember being told about the Maori concept of Mana by someone. It's supposed to be some measure of status I think. Does anyone know more on this?

Jumper wrote:
Quote:
18 Hon David Parker

Minister of Energy
Minister for Land Information
Minister Responsible for Climate Change Issues



So now you know who to blame for Climate Changes...


I thought we'd already ascertained that cows are responsible!

 
BondiTram
105739.  Mon Oct 23, 2006 12:06 pm Reply with quote

smiley_face wrote:

I thought we'd already ascertained that cows are responsible!


The local farmer has just installed some very pretty Friesians in the field where I walk the dogs in the morning. I feel warmer already.

BTW he put up the electric fence 2 days before he switched it on. Guess who was the first to get zapped. The second was Lira the greyhound
who let out a loud yelp and demonstrated what greyhounds are famous for half way across the field. The cows are unmoved and barely interested. What's happened to their genetic wolf memory? Grrrr.

 

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