View previous topic | View next topic

QI Words and Etymology

Page 1 of 6
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

Gray
29115.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 3:13 pm Reply with quote

Your place to discuss lexical ancestry.

 
Anna
29116.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 3:42 pm Reply with quote

Here's an interesting one.
Quote:
Cardigan
1868, from James Thomas Brudenell (1797-1868), 7th Earl of Cardigan, English general distinguished in the Crimean War, who set the style, in one account supposedly wearing such a jacket while leading the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava (1854)

From etymonline.com

I find it QI that cardigan should have such illustrious and active coinage. =D

 
samivel
29119.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 4:41 pm Reply with quote

It can't have afforded much in the way of protection

 
Anna
29120.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 5:00 pm Reply with quote

I wonder if his mum knitted it for him...

 
Flash
29125.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 5:41 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
while leading the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava

That's all very well, but what was he wearing to keep his head warm?

 
Anna
29130.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 6:07 pm Reply with quote

Perhaps he had an entire knitwear ensemble. =D

 
Natalie
29131.  Mon Oct 31, 2005 6:10 pm Reply with quote

He probably wasn't using his head much, so it didn't need to stay warm.

 
Ciggywink
29418.  Thu Nov 03, 2005 10:33 am Reply with quote

From 'Brand New Information' strand:

This whole "Thing" thing gets odder. Have just checked the German which I don't speak - help! anyone out there who does? - and there are 2 words, it seems for 'thing' in German - "Ding" and "Sache" which also means 'cause...matter...case...business'

 
JumpingJack
29716.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 12:29 pm Reply with quote

Here's one I found this morning.

Climax is Greek for 'ladder'.

 
thetwig
29719.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 12:41 pm Reply with quote

"News" is actually a special use of the plural of "New", not as the myth goes that it comes from the initials of "North, South, East, West".

 
Jenny
29727.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 1:03 pm Reply with quote

According to the online etymology dictionary, the use of 'climax' with the meaning of 'orgasm' was first recorded in 1918, apparently coined by birth-control pioneer Marie Stopes, as a more accessible word than orgasm.

 
JumpingJack
29800.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:20 pm Reply with quote

So is a woman's orgasm a bit like climbing a ladder?

 
Jenny
29817.  Sun Nov 06, 2005 8:58 pm Reply with quote

Let me check that. Ask me again tomorrow.

 
dharlequin
30074.  Mon Nov 07, 2005 11:50 pm Reply with quote

Stopes uses "climax" alongside "orgasm" in her book Married Love, rather than as a replacement. She uses it in its ordinary descriptive sense as often as she uses it as a synonym, as I recall.

The legacy of Stopes in this, as in other matters, was double-edged. She encouraged men and women to seek mutual orgasm, rather neglected in marriage manuals since the 17th century, when it was seen as essential for conception. On the other hand, she implied that there was something discreditable about the failure to achieve it.

Mutual pleasuring is obviously a good thing, but loading a sense of failure on those women who are physiologically incapable of orgasm is not one of the 20th century's more emancipating changes in sexuality.

 
Mostly Harmless
30078.  Tue Nov 08, 2005 12:31 am Reply with quote

..


Last edited by Mostly Harmless on Sun Jan 08, 2006 4:38 pm; edited 1 time in total

 

Page 1 of 6
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group