View previous topic | View next topic

Skydiving General Ignorance

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

grizzly
94090.  Mon Sep 18, 2006 8:09 am Reply with quote

Quote:
At present, there are even a couple of teams working on landing a wingsuit, in the near future!


Just need an engine to strap to your back then.

 
Tas
94092.  Mon Sep 18, 2006 8:25 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Just need an engine to strap to your back then.


Wouldn't you just need a way of deploying a landing-chute or extra wing material to give you a stall speed around 20 mph or so, or even less... (i.e. running speed)?

:-)

Tas

 
mr2mk1g
94096.  Mon Sep 18, 2006 8:38 am Reply with quote

grizzly wrote:
Quote:
At present, there are even a couple of teams working on landing a wingsuit, in the near future!


Just need an engine to strap to your back then.


Done already: http://youtube.com/watch?v=l9DWAuqP-CQ

 
mr2mk1g
94097.  Mon Sep 18, 2006 8:40 am Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
Quote:
Just need an engine to strap to your back then.


Wouldn't you just need a way of deploying a landing-chute or extra wing material to give you a stall speed around 20 mph or so, or even less... (i.e. running speed)?

:-)

Tas


That's essentially exactly what they do at present. They make their flight, get as low as they can safely, then deploy a parachute to arrest their descent and make it possible to have more than one go at it per lifetime.

 
grizzly
94104.  Mon Sep 18, 2006 9:04 am Reply with quote

It would be great if you didn't need a parachute at all though.

I was wondering if you could get enough lift from a wing suit to take off from the ground using a small jet engine of some sort. Then again would you have to register your clothes as a light aircraft?

 
Tas
94106.  Mon Sep 18, 2006 9:06 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I was wondering if you could get enough lift from a wing suit to take off from the ground using a small jet engine of some sort. Then again would you have to register your clothes as a light aircraft?


Sheesh! You'll be asking for Repulsor Beams and Super-Strength as well, soon!

:-)

Tas

 
English Pete
94722.  Wed Sep 20, 2006 8:20 am Reply with quote

may need to reinforce your skeleton

what you need is a plane!

 
Tas
94780.  Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:24 am Reply with quote

Quote:
what you need is a plane!


How passe!

*not worked out accents on a keyboard, yet*

:-)

Tas

 
Ameena
94785.  Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:30 am Reply with quote

You can get accents on some vowels if you hold Alt Gr and press the key - .

 
Gaazy
94803.  Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:51 am Reply with quote

Ameena wrote:
You can get accents on some vowels if you hold Alt Gr and press the key - .

That's a QI discovery - though I can't find the secret of the other common accents (grave and circumflex).

Seeing as I need to use all three all the time, I use the Alt+numpad technique, which necessitates a memory for numbers (or a list pinned on the wall). , for example, is Alt+0226.

 
suze
94815.  Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:11 am Reply with quote

After too many years using them, I know most of the common ones without needing to look them up. But how do you manage Welshnesses such as w with a circumflex?

That particular character isn't any of the standard fonts. I'm sure you have access to specialist Welsh fonts - but if not, is it OK just to omit the circumflex?

 
mr2mk1g
96415.  Mon Sep 25, 2006 11:14 am Reply with quote

I suppose I ought answer the remaining questions for you.
Questions 1 though 4 are answered correctly above.

Q5. This is actually rather hard to answer with confirmed and thoroughly reliable statistics. The British Parachute Association has collected statistics which indicate that 1 in every 750 first jump student parachute deployments results in the deployment of a reserve.

Ive quite deliberately been precise there with the definition Ive used. Its important to note that I did not say that 1:750 results in a malfunction or failure of the main parachute to correctly deploy. Students will commonly jettison their main parachute and make use of their reserve even when their main parachute has correctly deployed (stress situations are difficult to train for) so the statistic doesnt actually show the true malfunction rate.

We can say that actual rate is much lower than 1:750. For experienced parachutists it is difficult to collect accurate data as jump numbers are not centrally reported. It should also be noted that experienced parachutists will commonly use parachutes more prone to malfunction and undertake activities which increase the risk of a malfunction of any given equipment when compared to a student. This will also skew their data.

Overall the malfunction rate is reckoned to be somewhere around 1:1000 or 1:1500

Q6. Well I did say this question was a joke. Answers are generally comical and revolve around trying to make sure you land on riggers car or similar variant. They can be quite grim at times such as: try to hold on to the grass its the bounce that kills you. The real answer is probably: keep trying anything and everything right up too impact you might just succeed. I know of instances when this has indeed worked.

There are also numerous instances of people surviving a landing under a malfunctioned parachute, especially where the malfunction is partial, (parachute material is released to cause significant drag, albeit not in the appropriate parachute shape). Genuine survival stories of surviving a malfunction almost always involve the subject surviving a landing under a significant amount of material, (though genuine instances of surviving terminal impact have been documented they are extremely rare however).

My favourite answer however must be: take your shoe off and shove it up your bum. At least you will die with the knowledge that the accident investigator will never ever be able to figure out why on earth it was there.

 
BondiTram
97359.  Thu Sep 28, 2006 5:52 am Reply with quote

mr2mk1g wrote:
Students will commonly jettison their main parachute and make use of their reserve even when their main parachute has correctly deployed (stress situations are difficult to train for) so the statistic doesnt actually show the true malfunction rate.


That is the most terrifying statistic. Imagine jettisoning your correctly deployed main 'chute and then finding out that the reserve doesn't work!!

 
mr2mk1g
98579.  Mon Oct 02, 2006 11:33 am Reply with quote

BondiTram wrote:


That is the most terrifying statistic. Imagine jettisoning your correctly deployed main 'chute and then finding out that the reserve doesn't work!!


Well they'll sometimes do it. Stress is a funny thing. The odds on a reserve not working however are extremely long.

 
dr.bob
98850.  Tue Oct 03, 2006 7:31 am Reply with quote

Is a reserve parachute designed differently from a normal one to make it less likely to fail? If so, what are the differences, and why are normal parachutes designed to be less likely to fail as well?

 

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group