View previous topic | View next topic

Who can see what Qi on TV and when?

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

jaygeemack
1380937.  Wed May 05, 2021 4:31 pm Reply with quote

Margaret Baird (nee Albu), John Logie Baird’s widow, lived in a care home in Hamilton, Lanarkshire until her death aged 89 in 1996.

I can imagine a conversation, “What did your husband do for a living?” “He invented television.”

Logie Baird Primary School in Helensburgh is known locally as Yogi Bear Primary.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1380940.  Wed May 05, 2021 4:34 pm Reply with quote

jaygeemack wrote:
Margaret Baird (nee Albu), John Logie Baird’s widow, lived in a care home in Hamilton, Lanarkshire until her death aged 89 in 1996.

I can imagine a conversation, “What did your husband do for a living?” “He invented television.”


Reply from the nearest staff member: "Sure he did, sweetheart. Now here are your pills."


:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1380943.  Wed May 05, 2021 5:01 pm Reply with quote

jaygeemack wrote:
Logie Baird Primary School in Helensburgh is known locally as Yogi Bear Primary.


Oh good, it wasn't just me then!

I was probably about 8 when I first heard the name of John Logie Baird - and yes, I immediately dubbed him John Yogi Bear.


His playing career was before my time, but one of the big names in baseball used to be a gentleman named Lawrence Berra (1925-2015), who was commonly known as Yogi Berra. The nickname is said to have arisen because Mr Berra was given to sitting on the ground in the lotus position while waiting his turn at bat. He was known for his wisecracks to media, and among other things is believed to have been the first to say "It ain't over til it's over".

It is the official position of Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc, that the character Yogi Bear (who was created twelve years after Mr Berra began his career in professional baseball) is not named after him. It's just a name they thought up, without even noticing that it was rather similar to the name of a well known baseballist, honest.

I don't think anyone has ever really believed it, but making that statement was a condition of Mr Berra dropping a lawsuit against Hanna-Barbera.

 
jaygeemack
1380945.  Wed May 05, 2021 5:22 pm Reply with quote

The local GP in Mallaig was Dr Donald Duck (1924-2006) who predated his more famous namesake. He was a good doctor, by all accounts, and not a quack. (Sorry!)

He was asked on numerous occasions why he didn’t change his name, but he said he had too much fun with it to change it. It caused some problems when he was signing cheques or prescriptions.

 
dr.bob
1380963.  Thu May 06, 2021 4:19 am Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
Returning to the issue of when the first "regular" television transmissions started
<snip>
So 22nd August 1932 is the date when the Baird transmissions came under the auspices of the BBC. Is this perhaps the best date to choose?


Thanks for the article, but I don't see how it addresses the question of "regular" transmissions. We've already seen that BBC transmissions two years later in 1934 were far from regular.

Having said all that, a "regular TV service" is a phrase that's sufficiently vague it probably allows several different countries to claim the title.

 
dr.bob
1380964.  Thu May 06, 2021 4:20 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
Hill Street Blues in colour was so much better.


Otherwise it'd be Hill Street Greys.

Thank you! I'm here all week. Try the fish.

 
PDR
1380968.  Thu May 06, 2021 5:29 am Reply with quote

[geek mode] Of course those viewers of pre-digital broadcast colour TV in north america would usually have very poor colour reproduction because the analogue NTSC signal format allowed the signal variations in marginal conditions (pretty well everywhere outside the cities in the colonies) to alter the colour signal. So the colours would change with the wind, rain, moon cycle and any variance in local mean ambient grandparent age factor.

Germany developed the PAL signal format which was similar, but had the colour signals inverted in alternate frames. This made the effect of signal variations cancel out and so maintained excellent colour stability even in very marginal reception areas. The PAL system was adopted by most of europe, the UK and most of the rest of the world for this reason. All apart from France, who developed their own completely incompatible SECAM format because, well they are French, and that's the sort of thing the French do (cf Minitel etc).

[/geek]

NALOPKT(&EFGAS),

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1380972.  Thu May 06, 2021 6:54 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
[geek mode] Of course those viewers of pre-digital broadcast colour TV in north america would usually have very poor colour reproduction because the analogue NTSC signal format allowed the signal variations in marginal conditions (pretty well everywhere outside the cities in the colonies) to alter the colour signal. So the colours would change with the wind, rain, moon cycle and any variance in local mean ambient grandparent age factor.

Germany developed the PAL signal format which was similar, but had the colour signals inverted in alternate frames. This made the effect of signal variations cancel out and so maintained excellent colour stability even in very marginal reception areas. The PAL system was adopted by most of europe, the UK and most of the rest of the world for this reason. All apart from France, who developed their own completely incompatible SECAM format because, well they are French, and that's the sort of thing the French do (cf Minitel etc).

[/geek]

NALOPKT(&EFGAS),

PDR


When did SECAM and PAL become incompatible? The reason why us kids used to watch AFN at American neighbours' houses was that they had NTSC compatible tellies and we didn't, so if ever there was a compatibility issue between colour systems, it was between those two. Otherwise we'd have been just fine watching it at home. Between PAL and SECAM, on the other hand, there's never been any compatibility issue at all, as can be seen by:

a) Naughty little DDR-Bürger watching PAL Westfernsehen on their SECAM-B/G tellies without any issues.
b) Me enjoying SECAM-L French TV on my PAL set when I lived near the French border in the nineties.

Just saying...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Thu May 06, 2021 8:03 am; edited 1 time in total

 
PDR
1380975.  Thu May 06, 2021 7:23 am Reply with quote

Most european (and some british) analogue TV sets had two separate video decoders - one for PAL and one for SECAM. Some had three, the third being an NTSC one. SECAM used frequency modulated colour data (rather than the amplitude modulated colour signal in PAL and NTSC). It also transmitted the R and G data alternately rather than concurrently. These are electronically incompatible data formats.

The signal formats are mutually incompatible and accommodating them simply added cost by requiring the duplication of components. You find similar issues in today's DVD players where the the video information might be in any of about half a dozen (analogue) formats, not all of which can be accommodated in software.

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1380979.  Thu May 06, 2021 9:13 am Reply with quote

Hm...I was about to run rings around you by asking why on earth the GDR authorities would have allowed to PAL-compatible to TVs to be manufactured in their VEBs, but the answer to that one is actually quite obvious:

a) Making the consumption of Westfernsehen as convenient as possible for their citizens was an easy and efficient addition to their observation arsenal.
b) A substantial amount of budget electronics sold in West Germany was contract manufactured by RFT or just rebadged for export, so the PAL decoders were built in by default.

Dang... I hate it when people might actually be correct.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1380987.  Thu May 06, 2021 10:06 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:

Dang... I hate it when people might actually be correct.


Did I mention the bit about the chrominance signals embedded in the sub-carrier being blocked by tinned sauerkraut, preventing the non-inverting NTSC signals being received in central europe?

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1380988.  Thu May 06, 2021 10:28 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:

Dang... I hate it when people might actually be correct.


Did I mention the bit about the chrominance signals embedded in the sub-carrier being blocked by tinned sauerkraut, preventing the non-inverting NTSC signals being received in central europe?

PDR


Did I mention that no self-respecting European with a functioning frontal lobe and intact colour vision would even want NTSC because it still stands for Never The Same Colour as it always has? The only reason why I felt different about it as a teenager is that our German broadcasters were three years behind on the Cosby Show.

(Also, what a beautifully obsolete debate...)

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1380993.  Thu May 06, 2021 11:37 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:

Did I mention that no self-respecting European with a functioning frontal lobe and intact colour vision would even want NTSC because it still stands for Never The Same Colour as it always has?


ITYM "Never Twice the Same Colour".

I was just trying to say something that WASN'T correct to restore the balance and un-dang the universe...

PDR

 
dr.bob
1381032.  Fri May 07, 2021 3:52 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
ITYM "Never Twice the Same Colour".


There was a healthy disrespect between the two standards. Apparently merkins used to refer to PAL as "Picture Always Lousy"

 
CB27
1381176.  Sun May 09, 2021 6:49 pm Reply with quote

Looking up first broadcasts, I think the first regular one may have to go to the US, and in particular to W2XCW in Schenectady, New York.

It was an experimental station linked to a local radio station, which began broadcasting on 13th January 1928, and in September of that year broadcast a drama called "The Queen's Messenger". It was described as a "blood and thunder play with guns, daggers, and poison".

Technical limitations (and the tiny screens) mean that only individual hands or faces could be seen at one time.

In May 19287 the Washington Post reported that the stations was broadcasting regularly on the afternoons of Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and their programming was to include Opera singers.

 

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group