View previous topic | View next topic

Kermit is Evil

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Dix
1377167.  Fri Mar 19, 2021 12:44 pm Reply with quote

True, that.
I remember from my early teen years that they had some technical trouble at the start of an episode of some detective series and none of us noticed that "Where's the body?" wasn't subtitled.

In those days they had to stop, repair the technical issue and restart. They restarted that one several times.
Today they'd probably let it run, sort out whatever the issue was, and press the "next text" button really fast a number of times.

 
CB27
1377437.  Mon Mar 22, 2021 8:27 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
When I spent my year in Moscow, watching TV helped me learn new words and phrases to a great degree.
Though I did confuse myself watching ice hockey, when I was puzzled that this guy named Shaiba (шайба) seemed to play in every game.
It's the Russian for 'puck'. 🤪😒

Reminds me of the time a friend was working in a Greek shipping office and asked me if my mum's name is Greek. I was a bit confused by this because it's not. He then asked his boss the next time why so many people he talks to are called Malka, and that's when we learned that the Greek for asshole is Malaka...

 
AlmondFacialBar
1377440.  Mon Mar 22, 2021 8:45 am Reply with quote

FWIW, two jobs ago it took me a much longer time than would strictly be justified for a person of average intelligence to cop that the Polish healthcare industry doesn't boast an unusually high number of people with the name of Tak...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
CB27
1377462.  Mon Mar 22, 2021 2:07 pm Reply with quote

All of them living with Mr Prawo Jazdy?

 
AlmondFacialBar
1377463.  Mon Mar 22, 2021 2:09 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
All of them living with Mr Prawo Jazdy?


Of course, what did you think?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Brock
1377466.  Mon Mar 22, 2021 2:24 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
All of them living with Mr Prawo Jazdy?


I hadn't heard that story before!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/7899171.stm

A bit like the driver who wondered why Wales has so many service stations called "Gwasanaethau"...

 
crissdee
1377494.  Mon Mar 22, 2021 5:57 pm Reply with quote

One of the first words in Welsh I learned to recognise when I started coming down here on holiday. "Arafwch" was another.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1377545.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 8:22 am Reply with quote

Come to think of it, anyone sitting near me with no grasp of German at all would probably also wonder why I get so many tickets from users by the name of Arschloch.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1377547.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 8:35 am Reply with quote

When we were on Anglesey we saw plenty of beaches , but we never found the really big one. I must be huge, because it was signposted from pretty-well everywhere on the island. Wherever we went we saw these signs to Traeth Beach.

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1377550.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 8:56 am Reply with quote

Gosh, one of the few cognates between Brittonic and Goidelic there. It's trá as Gaeilge and tràigh an Gàidhlig.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
cornixt
1377563.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 11:03 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
I must be huge,

A year of lockdown has not been kind to everyone's girth.

 
suze
1377568.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 12:30 pm Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Gosh, one of the few cognates between Brittonic and Goidelic there. It's trá as Gaeilge and tràigh an Gàidhlig.


Probably a loan from Latin tractus = a tract of land in both cases. Since the Romans never went to Ireland, this tends to suggest that Irish borrowed the word from Welsh rather than the other way about.

Geography terms which are cognate between Brythonic and Goidelic are usually either prehistoric (Proto-Celtic), or relatively recent (ie from the last one thousand years, and taken from Norse or English). In-between terms of Latin origin are fairly few, and of some interest to scholars in the field. Why did the Celts never need a word for "beach" before the Romans provided them with one?

 
AlmondFacialBar
1377572.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 12:50 pm Reply with quote

Why doesn't German, a country with proper winters, not have a real world for slush (we - of course - use a compound noun that translates into snow mud) and French, a country bordering two major seas, doesn't have a word for shallow? These things aren't always logical.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Awitt
1377609.  Tue Mar 23, 2021 5:21 pm Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Come to think of it, anyone sitting near me with no grasp of German at all would probably also wonder why I get so many tickets from users by the name of Arschloch.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


On German published books of music, is the word Verlag. When I went through the training for the music library, the woman training me speaks German so explained it (and she was fine once she realised I know it) but previous cataloguers had been putting this as part of the publisher.

Nowadays with Google you'd think they'd look it up, but one woman thought it meant 'publisher', which it does, but in English we don't normally put 'Schott publisher', Penguin publisher, etc in catalogues.

The music library publishing field has a character limit - a draw back to the original Access document that it was - and I've had to shorten other names so they fit.

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
1378691.  Wed Apr 07, 2021 5:43 am Reply with quote

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group