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Harry Dunn

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barbados
1341294.  Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:59 am Reply with quote

Was it repealed in 1989
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1989/43/schedule/1/enacted
Schedule 1 part X.?

However, traffic did used to proceed on the left before the 19th Century,

https://www.worldstandards.eu/cars/driving-on-the-left/

 
cornixt
1341352.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:08 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
I'd be surprised if the USA (at federal and state levels) doesn't have a corresponding law.


I don't think that there are any federal highway laws for operating vehicles, that's all at state level. But which state would you use? Their declared residence state or somewhere like DC?

 
PDR
1341354.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:37 am Reply with quote

I don't know, but I'm sure there must be something that says they have to drive on the left - that's what they'd point to.

PDR

 
ali
1341364.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:51 pm Reply with quote

barbados wrote:
Was it repealed in 1989
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1989/43/schedule/1/enacted
Schedule 1 part X.?


Parts of it were. The text here is what remains.

'F1' marks where passages were deleted in 1989 (i.e. everything before "if the driver..." and everything after "level 1 on the standard scale".

 
suze
1341367.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:13 pm Reply with quote

As for driving on the right in the US, as cornixt notes that is a state matter. Each state got to decide for itself whether it should drive on the right or the left. They all chose right, although one drives on the left in the US Virgin Islands (mainly because one does in the neigbouring formerly British Caribbean nations).

The provinces of Canada didn't all decide the same way, but pressure from Ottawa caused those which had chosen left to switch in the 20th century. Prince Edward Island was the last to switch, in 1924. (Newfoundland didn't switch until 1947, but it wasn't part of Canada until 1949.)

If any US state really really wanted to switch to the left, I don't think the federal government could actually stop it - although I have no doubt that it would try to talk that state out of the switch.

You could look up each state's statute on the matter if you really wanted to. As one example, here is Georgia's.

I am not a lawyer, but isn't the mention of right there as against the mention of left in the Highway Act 1835 sufficiently explicit that driving on the right may be considered a thing that is prohibited in England but permitted in Georgia? As such, a soldier from Georgia who does that thing in England cannot rely on the VFA to keep himself out of court. Well, maybe; it might be worth a try anyway.

 
tetsabb
1341371.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 4:21 pm Reply with quote

Hey, America.
We send you Prince Andrew to help with the investigation into Jeffrey Epstein and you send us Anne Sacoolas to help us with our investigation into the death of Harry Dunn?

 
cnb
1341373.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 5:18 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
I am not a lawyer, but isn't the mention of right there as against the mention of left in the Highway Act 1835 sufficiently explicit that driving on the right may be considered a thing that is prohibited in England but permitted in Georgia? As such, a soldier from Georgia who does that thing in England cannot rely on the VFA to keep himself out of court. Well, maybe; it might be worth a try anyway.

If that was the only difference, then as PDR suggests I think it very unlikely that a court would accept that there was a fundamental difference - both places require you to drive on the correct side of the road - that one is left and the other right being a minor technical difference. I think that is the case, but not with the law you've quoted.
That Georgia law requires drivers to drive on the "right half of the roadway" except in certain circumstances. There is no equivalent requirement in England - you can drive on any part of the carriageway you like if there's nobody else around. It is only when passing an oncoming vehicle that passing to the left is relevant.
The relevant Georgia law is this one - the following section - which is near-identical to the English equivalent except for the left/right switch.

 
crissdee
1341374.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 5:28 pm Reply with quote

cnb wrote:
There is no equivalent requirement in England - you can drive on any part of the carriageway you like if there's nobody else around.


I'm glad you said that, because in a bit of Builth Wells (hereinafter referred to as "this bit 'ere)



it is virtually impossible to remain in lane when heading east (to the right on this view) because there are ALWAYS cars parked on the left, with an empty lane on the right.

 
PDR
1341375.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 5:57 pm Reply with quote

cnb wrote:

If that was the only difference, then as PDR suggests I think it very unlikely that a court would accept that there was a fundamental difference - both places require you to drive on the correct side of the road - that one is left and the other right being a minor technical difference.


Yes, that's exactly what I was trying to say, but you've expressed it a lot more clearly! Thanks cnb.

PDR

 
suze
1341376.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 6:04 pm Reply with quote

cnb wrote:
The relevant Georgia law is this one - the following section - which is near-identical to the English equivalent except for the left/right switch.


Damnit! Foiled again in my attempt to make Americans live within the law!

There are no longer US forces stationed in Iceland, but they'd have loved it there. Iceland officially switched from driving left to driving right in 1968, and doesn't really deny that "being different from the UK" was part of the reason for doing it.

In fact, it's only really relevant on the streets of ReykjavÝk and on most of Ůjˇ­vegur 1 (the ring road). Even a small part of Ůjˇ­vegur 1 is still single track, and so are most other roads outside the Capital Region - and you may pass on either side.

That's for practical reasons. Especially "inside" the ring, a "road" is actually a gravel track marked by posts; the experience is probably tolerably similar to driving on the Moon. You can't travel at much more than 20 mph on those roads in any case, and everyone accepts that you pass on whichever side is consistent with not forcing the other driver into the shifting lava field.

 
PDR
1341378.  Mon Jan 27, 2020 6:41 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
the experience is probably tolerably similar to driving on the Moon.


You're not the first person to suggest that. NASA trained moon-landing astronauts in Iceland for that reason.

PDR

 
cornixt
1341424.  Tue Jan 28, 2020 11:28 am Reply with quote

Iceland has put in a lot of two-lane paved roads now, not that you see anyone outside of the capital. The drives I took to the non-city tourist areas (close enough to Reykjavik that everyone would visit) were mostly without seeing more than a couple of other cars until you were practically in the car park. There's more traffic in any UK town after midnight than on the roads 10 miles from Reykjavik during the day.

 
suze
1341431.  Tue Jan 28, 2020 12:03 pm Reply with quote

You don't see a great deal of traffic outside the Capital Region, do you?

I suppose that's not surprising, since Iceland is three quarters the size of England but has less than 1% of the population. What's more, two thirds of that rather small population lives in 1% of the land mass within ten miles of the penis museum.

If we strip out H÷fu­borgarsvŠ­i (the "county" made up of the city of ReykjavÝk and the five commuter towns which surround it in that 1% of the land mass), the rest of Iceland has a population density of 1.27 persons per sq km.

That's a lower figure than for the Isle of Skye or Siberia. It's similar to the figure for Mongolia or for South Australia - and I am assured that once you leave Adelaide, there is an awful lot of bugger all in South Australia.

 
Jenny
1341434.  Tue Jan 28, 2020 12:12 pm Reply with quote

Sounds something like Maine - two thirds the size of England, with a population around 1.2 million except when swarmed with tourists in the summer. Of those, at least two thirds live in the south-east of the state.

 
dr.bob
1341503.  Wed Jan 29, 2020 5:55 am Reply with quote

Yeah, I remember when I visited New England in 2017 and got chatting to a local retail assistant, she asked me how I was finding Vermont. Even though it has a higher population density than Maine, my immediate response was "roomy!".

 

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