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Building bigger cities

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dr.bob
1321790.  Tue May 14, 2019 8:45 am Reply with quote

cnb wrote:
I think that even with every module having a dense centre, people would still travel within the city as a whole to get to work. It's likely that each module would develop specialisms, so you'd have a module or two where financial businesses cluster together, and another where all the media businesses are etc.


That's an interesting point. I'm not entirely convinced that modules would develop specialisms. Currently in a city like London, there's a certain amount of kudos to owning a certain address. If you're running a media company, it looks cool if you have an address in Soho. If you're running a bank, an address in the City of London carries a certain amount of kudos. In a brand new city, this would no longer apply.

There's no real need for companies to be physically close to each other in this age of telecommunications and video conferencing. There might occasionally be a requirement to have a face-to-face meeting but, given the excellent transport system in Bobsville, that's not a problem either even if your modules are a long way from each other.

However, I take your point that different family members may work for different companies and need to travel across the city. But surely that only applies for skilled workers.

You said above that each set of 9 modules puts every person within reach of a full-service general hospital and probably a dozen major supermarkets. Add in all the offices in those modules as well and you'll have a lot of low-skilled jobs to choose from. Surely most low-skilled workers won't have much incentive to travel far for their work. Even if they end up doing so, they'll surely keep an eye on the job market and switch to a job closer to home as soon as one comes available so, over time, the vast majority of low skilled workers will work very close to home.

cnb wrote:
Even if it's only a fairly small proportion of people who travel, the transport requirements once Bobsville grows to a few million inhabitants is still likely to be enough to warrant a rail network (see earlier post discussing how many buses it would need).


I guess the question then becomes "what proportion of city workers work in high-skilled jobs?"

suze wrote:
On the other hand, if your startup city needs an Assistant Head Teacher Colon Head of Language Arts for the girls' grammar school that it is of course going to have ...


You'd obviously be a shoe-in, despite the number of employment laws that would break ;-)

 
suze
1321803.  Tue May 14, 2019 11:59 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
You'd obviously be a shoe-in, despite the number of employment laws that would break ;-)


It wouldn't actually break any employment laws. With limited exceptions there is no compulsion to advertise vacancies, although not doing can in some circumstances leave the school open to a discrimination claim.

My current role was never advertised, but then the role was devised with me in mind and specified in such a way that only I could realistically do it. If I were to leave they'd probably have to advertise for my replacement, but if the Head and I already had a successor in mind, it wouldn't be difficult to conduct the process - within the law - such that no one else had much of a chance.

There hasn't been a completely new grammar school in England since the 70s*, so there's no one still in the industry who has been involved in starting one up. But I suspect that once the governing body had appointed a Head, she would be allowed to headhunt rather than recruit for some of the senior positions.


* The one in Sevenoaks which opened in 2017 was an additional campus of an existing school rather than a new school. A fudge, and a badly handled fudge at that, but the staff are employed by the pre-existing school.

 
GuyBarry
1321822.  Tue May 14, 2019 6:54 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:

You'd obviously be a shoe-in


https://grammarist.com/spelling/shoo-in/

(Is this a lost cause?)

 
crissdee
1321840.  Wed May 15, 2019 4:03 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
..........they were actually proud of the fact that they still had over a million WW2-era Lee-Enfield rifles and over 500rounds of ammunition per rifle......


I think I'd be quite proud of having a million rifles and half a billion rounds of ammo for them so I could equip my own militia. Probably best not to contemplate what I might do if I had them though............

 
PDR
1321843.  Wed May 15, 2019 4:17 am Reply with quote

Well the rifles were properly inhibited for storage, but can you imagine what state 30-40 year old ammunition would be in? IIRC rifle ammunition typically has a stated shelf life of 5 years. After that the cordite deteriorates.

PDR

 
dr.bob
1321845.  Wed May 15, 2019 4:23 am Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
https://grammarist.com/spelling/shoo-in/

(Is this a lost cause?)


Argh! Massive apologies. Maybe you could hold my sword while I throw myself upon it.

In a slight detour, there has been previous discussion on this thread about the desirability, or otherwise, of living in rural areas compared to living in cities. Coincidentally, I came across this article in the NY Times about the effects of austerity cuts on the poorer residents of Cumbria. It's quite a long read, but worth the effort IMHO.

For those who don't have the time, the article is summed up in a quote from a pensioner who lives in a village that used to be a 40 minute bus ride from Carlisle until the local council axed that bus route:

Quote:
You need to be rich or upper middle class to survive in the countryside nowadays.


I'm not trying to start a significant debate, since there are clearly advantages and disadvantages to both rural and urban living. I mainly wanted to highlight an interesting article. If there's anything that applies to this thread, it's maybe the point about how much easier and cheaper it is for a council to provide services to a densely populated urban area than it is to a sparsely populated rural area.

 
crissdee
1321850.  Wed May 15, 2019 6:19 am Reply with quote

@PDR, probably not cordite if it was WW2 stock, would have been nitro-cellulose if memory serves, better shelf life.

 
tetsabb
1321864.  Wed May 15, 2019 8:22 am Reply with quote

're Bob's raising of life in rural areas.
Our village has a pub, an expensive kitchen outfitters, and a Porsche dealer, plus 2 postboxes.
The nearest grocery store is the co-op, about 3 miles away in the oval town, which has a reasonable array of shops.
We are on a bus route on about an hourly schedule.
Very few of my neighbours work locally
We have a community hall that hosts a variety of activities, including the horticultural society and a stool ball team.
We are better off than some similar villages, but worse than many others. Some are dying on their feet, it would appear.

 
dr.bob
1321872.  Wed May 15, 2019 10:39 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
Our village has a pub, an expensive kitchen outfitters, and a Porsche dealer, plus 2 postboxes.


Good to see you're able to indulge your Porsche buying habit ;-)

 
crissdee
1321893.  Wed May 15, 2019 2:09 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
3 miles away in the oval town....


?????

 
GuyBarry
1321894.  Wed May 15, 2019 2:16 pm Reply with quote

Kennington?

 
tetsabb
1321955.  Thu May 16, 2019 11:34 am Reply with quote

local, dammit.

 
suze
1321974.  Thu May 16, 2019 4:22 pm Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
Kennington?


Undoubtedly an Oval town, so have a couple of points! A bit nearer to tetsabb, Eastbourne is also an Oval town.

The cricket ground in Eastbourne - once used regularly by Sussex, but now considered too small for county cricket and used only occasionally - is called The Saffrons.

But a couple of miles up the road from The Saffrons is the stadium of Eastbourne United FC, which is called The Oval. At one time it was surrounded by a running track, hence the shape and the name. The running track is no more and largely grassed over and so the football ground is the more conventional rectangular shape - but it is still called The Oval.

 
Jenny
1322033.  Fri May 17, 2019 10:54 am Reply with quote

Do they have a theme song that goes something like "We are the Ovaltownies, happy girls and boys"?

 
GuyBarry
1322035.  Fri May 17, 2019 11:03 am Reply with quote

What did Horace say, Winnie?

 

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