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Do androids dream of electric cars?

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barbados
1326043.  Fri Jul 05, 2019 3:21 pm Reply with quote

I think that could have been why Jenny was asking for a source for your information.
If you look at the categories, cat 1 - the one that still attracts the rebate - are exclusively fully electric, while those in cat 2/3 are plug-in hybrids

 
dr.bob
1326313.  Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:58 am Reply with quote

If anyone's interested in a source, here's an explanation of the changes that came into effect in November.

It lists the 3 categories of cars. As cnb says above, that actual categories haven't changed, simply the level of subsidy. Cat1 has seen its subsidy reduced, while cat2 & 3 no longer receive a subsidy at all.

 
dr.bob
1326766.  Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:49 am Reply with quote

According to a report on Bloomberg.com, there are currently almost 425,000 fully electric buses worldwide at the end of last year.

Of these, around 421,000 are in China.

Europe's 2,250 electric buses are slightly more numerous than the USA's 300, but they both have an awful long way to go to catch up.

 
cnb
1326773.  Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:26 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Europe's 2,250 electric buses are slightly more numerous than the USA's 300, but they both have an awful long way to go to catch up.


For something like 6 or 7 years until 2017, the Chinese government was providing a subsidy that brought the price of electric buses down to less than the price of a diesel equivalent (as long as it was a Chinese-made bus, of course). The subsidies have since been reduced, but the very high early subsidies allowed Chinese manufacturers to develop the technology and build production capacity.

Most of the European bus manufacturers have only launched their first electric models in the last year or two, or have yet to do so. Once there are buses designed for European markets, with local support and spare parts, available the numbers will probably pick up fast.

 
crissdee
1327306.  Tue Jul 23, 2019 3:46 pm Reply with quote

FYI, my 12 year old, 650, near-lunar mileage car has just done around 650 miles in four days, never missing a beat, and giving me in excess of 50 mpg even fully loaded on the motorway.

Even with my new funds from the house sale sitting in my account, why TF would I think of getting rid of it for an EV?

 
dr.bob
1327331.  Wed Jul 24, 2019 4:52 am Reply with quote

Right now it makes no sense for you. Although an EV could certainly do 650 miles in four days (163 miles per day is well within the range of most modern EVs) and it's cheaper to refuel an electric car than a diesel one, the initial capital costs make it uneconomic for you (and lots of other people) right now.

That will almost certainly change at some point in the future. Over time a thriving second-hand EV market is bound to develop, which will bring down the capital costs. Also, if the government stick to their plans to lower emissions in the future, they will almost certainly take measures to make it more expensive to own cars which produce CO2 emissions. At some point, the economic argument for you will tip in favour of owning an EV. How long that will take depends on a lot of factors, so it's hard to predict with any certainty.

 
dr.bob
1327334.  Wed Jul 24, 2019 5:01 am Reply with quote

I was going to make a post this morning to this thread anyway, and it's kind of related to cirssdee's point since it concerns second-hand EVs. One point that was raised upthread about buying a second-hand EV is the cost of replacing the battery. I've come across a recent report by Nissan which is based on data they've collected over the last few years about their Leaf EVs. Based on the data they've collected, it seems the batteries in their EVs are lasting way longer than anyone expected. Francisco Carranza, managing director of Renault-Nissan Energy Services, announced recently that they fully expect the batteries to last longer than the cars themselves.

I'm not entirely sure I entirely agree with Mr Carranza that the average life of a car is 10 years, but his prediction that EV batteries will last for 22 years sounds very encouraging.

In related news, Volkwagen recently announced that the company now expects the battery packs in its upcoming line of ID cars to last "the life of the cars."

 
Jenny
1327354.  Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:34 am Reply with quote

Well that's interesting, and corresponds with the only example I know personally of a Prius whose battery outlasted the actual car.

 
cnb
1327359.  Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:57 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
I'm not entirely sure I entirely agree with Mr Carranza that the average life of a car is 10 years, but his prediction that EV batteries will last for 22 years sounds very encouraging.


That's almost true in Japan, where cars last an average of about 13 years, but globally it's just over 20. He may have confused average life with average age.

 
crissdee
1327386.  Wed Jul 24, 2019 4:15 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Although an EV could certainly do 650 miles in four days (163 miles per day is well within the range of most modern EVs)


It wasn't so much the range I was pleased with, more that after twelve years and 212,000 miles, it was still working perfectly well.

 
Jenny
1327734.  Wed Jul 31, 2019 10:59 am Reply with quote

And here's an interesting thing - a solar-powered car!

https://www.quora.com/q/like-wow/The-first-long-range-solar-powered-car?ch=99&share=c9ca441f

 
Alexander Howard
1327738.  Wed Jul 31, 2019 11:26 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
And here's an interesting thing - a solar-powered car!

https://www.quora.com/q/like-wow/The-first-long-range-solar-powered-car?ch=99&share=c9ca441f


Slick! Just the thing to be seen in when I take my skiing holiday in the Cairngorms this winter. Ah.

 
Alexander Howard
1327941.  Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:37 am Reply with quote

Apparently there are not enough new engineers in Britain to keep the modern world running. Are there any engineers out there who can contradict this?

 
PDR
1327942.  Sun Aug 04, 2019 12:04 pm Reply with quote

It's a glib simplification of a complex issue, but I wouldn't necessarily dispute the core message that we need to encourage more youngsters to look at STEM-based careers.

Most companies (even engineering companies) offer higher pay, grade and advancement prospects to their project managers, commercial staff and finance staff than they do to their engineers, and I can't help thinking this is part of the problem.

PDR

 
cornixt
1327977.  Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:15 am Reply with quote

They don't pay them enough in Britain. I got a 40% pay rise when I moved to the US and I'm now earning far more than I could dream of getting in the UK for the equivalent job.

I think a lot of people are put off by the difficulty of the school work to graduate though, but the job itself is far easier for the most part.

 

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