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The QI Title Music

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GuyBarry
1289716.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 5:53 am Reply with quote

I've read through the entire thread now, and it seems that Howard Goodall may have unknowingly copied the work of about eight other composers in that one piece. Let's hope they don't all sue him at once!

 
Spud McLaren
1289745.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:25 am Reply with quote

As previously noted on these boards, Mr Goodall suffers (if that's the appropriate term*) from a condition known as involuntary audiation, in which one's internal mp3 player is on perpetual play. Sometimes it's a tune you've heard before; others, it's a tune nobody, anywhere, has ever heard before. So maybe he has unconciously concatenated some existing musical phrases - as previously noted, the chord progression limits the choice of notes in the melody.

* sometimes, when trying to concentrate on a task, it's bloody annoying.

Also see post 634983 et seq. Unfortunately some of the targets in the links have been removed.

 
Jenny
1289746.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:36 am Reply with quote

I'm with suze on this one - I see the similarity to Streets of London though. Since Streets of London appeared on Ralph McTell's 1969 album Spiral Staircase (was then released as a single in 1974, after which it was covered by about 200 different artists according to Wikipedia), I'd suggest that any plagiarism (probably unintended for the reasons Spud suggests above) comes from Late Night Anthem to Streets of London.

It's a shame that song is so firmly anchored to Ralph McTell though, as he wrote and recorded many songs I like better, including:

Let Me Down Easy

Nettle Wine

Zig-Zag Line

Edited to fix the link.


Last edited by Jenny on Wed Jul 11, 2018 11:11 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Spud McLaren
1289753.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 10:57 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Since Streets of London appeared on Ralph McTell's 1969 album Spiral Staircase (was then released as a single in 1974 ...)
The odd thing is, by the time it was released as a single, it was already done to death in the folk clubs.

But I doffcock.

 
GuyBarry
1289795.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 1:43 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
as previously noted, the chord progression limits the choice of notes in the melody


Well no, it doesn't. I compose music and I can write any number of different melodies over a given chord progression.

I'm sure I've accidentally copied other people's melodies on occasion, but I'm careful not to create a melody that's reminiscent of one that I already know. The problem is not creating a melody reminiscent of one that I don't know.

EDIT: What's all this stuff about Streets of London, anyway? I know the melody very well and I can't discern any resemblance to the melody of the QI theme tune. Would someone care to point out where it occurs?

Remember that using someone else's chord progression isn't regarded as plagiarism - only their melody.

 
suze
1289812.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 3:59 pm Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
EDIT: What's all this stuff about Streets of London, anyway? I know the melody very well and I can't discern any resemblance to the melody of the QI theme tune. Would someone care to point out where it occurs?


There is none. The similarity perceived by me and others is between Streets of London and Late Night Anthem.

 
Spud McLaren
1289825.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 4:59 pm Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
Spud McLaren wrote:
as previously noted, the chord progression limits the choice of notes in the melody
Well no, it doesn't.
I suppose it depends whether you're writing in a style that doesn't regard (say) a F#/G#/C# progression over a C chord as somewhat Ö unusual.

 
Mr. Hooper
1289844.  Wed Jul 11, 2018 9:26 pm Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
Oh there's a definite similarity - the melodic contour is the same in the first line and the start of the second, though the rhythm is different. The end of the second line is different though.
Yes, you are right. The last two notes of the phrase are different. It's funny - everytime I would watch QI, I would have this sense of kids singing, and I kept going to "It's a Small World," which clearly wasn't the melody. It's not a small world, it's a late night world.

I'm quite sure that Paul Schaffer isn't going to sue anyone, so there's no need for anyone to get defensive.

 
GuyBarry
1289862.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:25 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
GuyBarry wrote:
Spud McLaren wrote:
as previously noted, the chord progression limits the choice of notes in the melody
Well no, it doesn't.
I suppose it depends whether you're writing in a style that doesn't regard (say) a F#/G#/C# progression over a C chord as somewhat Ö unusual.


OK, so as a simple example take the so-called "50s progression" (C-Am-F-G, or the equivalent in other keys). Here's a list - by no means complete - of songs containing the progression. Would you say that any of them sound similar melodically?

 
Spud McLaren
1289925.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 12:29 pm Reply with quote

What is your point?

 
GuyBarry
1289934.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:29 pm Reply with quote

My point is that if you write two melodies over the same chord progression, they're unlikely to sound similar. That's how so many people start writing new tunes - they borrow someone else's chord progression (which is perfectly legal) and then create a tune over it.

(I tend not to myself, though I'm sure I've done so on occasion.)

 
Spud McLaren
1289942.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 3:28 pm Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
My point is that if you write two melodies over the same chord progression, they're unlikely to sound similar.
But if you write enough tunes to that sequence, some of them will be bound to sound to some degree similar to some others. Which is why this discussion arose in the first place, I believe.

 
GuyBarry
1289945.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 3:38 pm Reply with quote

Well in this particular case, we're talking about two melodies that are very close to each other. The actual notes are identical, as far as I'm aware, up to the second half of the second line. The rhythms are different.

Whether this would count as plagiarism in a court of law I'm not sure.

 
crissdee
1289953.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 5:04 pm Reply with quote

But for us poor schmucks who wouldn't know a chord if it bit us in the leg, they're just two different tunes.

;-)

 
Alfred E Neuman
1289961.  Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:58 pm Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
Well in this particular case, we're talking about two melodies that are very close to each other. The actual notes are identical, as far as I'm aware, up to the second half of the second line. The rhythms are different.

Whether this would count as plagiarism in a court of law I'm not sure.


I donít see that you can separate the melody from the rhythm - isnít a melody a combination of both the pitch and the rhythm?

 

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