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Misuse of Words and Phrases

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Southpaw
80659.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:14 am Reply with quote

'Coo', 'Bairn' and using 'But' at the end of a sentence also appear in Scottish.

 
Tas
80660.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:14 am Reply with quote

Meerkans tend to "-ize" many words, I have noticed. That annoys me somewhat. Not only can they not spell, but then to bastardise (-ize?) the words too.....well....I mean, honestly!

*stomps off*

:-)

Tas

 
dr.bob
80667.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:44 am Reply with quote

Robbie wrote:
A considerable number of people seem to think that people in the North East of England aren't speaking English properly; that they corrupt English words. However, many of the words are very closely taken from the Anglo-Saxon language which was common in the area after the Romans withdrew. Most Geordie words are more than 80% in Angle origin, as opposed to around 30% in standard English.


So you're saying that Geordies haven't developed much in the past 1,500 years?

Robbie wrote:
"Croggy" meaning to give someone a lift on a bicycle.


Now don't try telling me that Anglo-Saxons had bicycles! :)

 
djgordy
80670.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:51 am Reply with quote

"Croggy" is also said in Leicestershire for a lift on a bicycle, though I've never heard it in Derbyshire.

 
Quaintly Ignorant
80671.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 4:52 am Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
Meerkans tend to "-ize" many words, I have noticed. That annoys me somewhat. Not only can they not spell, but then to bastardise (-ize?) the words too.....well....I mean, honestly!

*stomps off*

:-)

Tas


That is why the spelling 'Americanization' is a funny in-joke for us Brits.

 
Feroluce
80703.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 6:47 am Reply with quote

The best one I've heard the septics come up with is a sporting term.

In sports if a player scores three times, we call it a hat-trick.
Americans don't have that term so they call it a triple.

If a player scores four times in hAmerica, he hasn't scored a quadruple, that would be far too obvious. They have invented a new term for when a player scores four times, it's called a fourple.

This can be extended to fiveple, sixple and so on.

It makes me glad they have their own country.

 
suze
80726.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:16 am Reply with quote

(Ice) hockey has hat-tricks in the sense you would expect i.e. a player scoring three goals in a game. Although it's not a sport I follow, I believe that American football uses it as well when a player gets three touchdowns.

Baseball does use the term, although for two unusual feats. But if a player just scores three runs in a game, then we just say he has scored three runs.

A baseball hat trick is either

i) the extremely rare feat of one player making a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game; or
ii) a player being struck out three times in the same game. Four times is a sombrero (big hat), five is alleged to be a platinum sombrero (very rare big hat) while six is called a Horn in the USA or a Gonzalez in Canada after the only two players who have ever contrived to do it.

The rare feat of three batters being out in the same play (i.e. off the same ball, in cricket terms) is called a triple play.

As for "fourple" in general, yes it is a reasonably common alternative to "quadruple" in the USA - although everyone knows it's not a proper word and they don't use it in formal discourse.

 
Quaintly Ignorant
80728.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:23 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:

As for "fourple" in general, yes it is a reasonably common alternative to "quadruple" in the USA - although everyone knows it's not a proper word and they don't use it in formal discourse.


But isn't that how these things start?

 
samivel
80729.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:25 am Reply with quote

Getting struck out six times in one match? I may not know much about baseball, but even I'm impressed with the level of ineptitude shown there. Way to go Messrs Horn and Gonzalez!




suze wrote:
As for "fourple" in general, yes it is a reasonably common alternative to "quadruple" in the USA - although everyone knows it's not a proper word


I bet the President doesn't.

 
suze
80736.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:17 am Reply with quote

Yes, and yes.

That is to say, yes the word "fourple" could catch on and become generally accepted - although the Canadians and the British seem to have largely avoided it so far.

And yes, Mr Horn and Mr Gonzalez must have been somewhat less than ept on those particular occasions. Sam Horn now calls the Boston Red Sox games for television and runs a sports training centre called Around The Horn. Alex Gonzalez has only recently retired from Major League play, but no-one on the west coast found it remotely funny when he achieved his spectacular feat playing for the Toronto Blue Jays ...

 
QI Individual
80744.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 10:12 am Reply with quote

If fourple doesn't catch on then maybe fourplay will. ;)

 
Pyriform
80754.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 10:55 am Reply with quote

Robbie wrote:
"He's a blonde." Blond is the spelling used for males, while blonde is exclusively for females.


Brunette must be gender specific, too, but what is the masculine equivalent? Bruno?

Edit: Come to think of it, is gender really the right word there? I get annoyed at those forms which ask you your 'gender' when they mean 'sex' (but presumably daren't say it in case it offends someone).

 
swot
80759.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:08 am Reply with quote

As far as I know gender refers to grammar, not to whether a person is male or female. The meaning does seem to have changed for some people recently though.

 
suze
80765.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:24 am Reply with quote

Quite right too, No 1.

Gender is a term from grammar. The gender of a French noun is masculine or feminine, in German it can also be neuter, and so on. Navajo manages to have eleven genders (although all living things are the same gender whichever sex they are).

In recent times, it has come into use to describe whether a person is a man or a woman. The very fact of this having happened has interested some academics, e.g. a man named Haig who teaches biology at Harvard.

(Haig, Dr David The inexorable rise of gender and the decline of sex: social change in academic titles, 1945-2001 in Archives of Sexual Behavior Vol. 33 No. 2, pp. 87-96, 2004)

He claims that there are four main reasons for the adoption of the word "gender":

* it sounds more "scientific" (he doesn't say that it is so, just that it is perceived so)
* it avoids "connotations of copulation"
* it "signals sympathy with feminist goals"
* perhaps the most significant - it means that those prudish Americans don't have to use words like "sex".

I have once and only once heard someone refer to two people "having gender" when he meant "having sexual intercourse". The person who said it was of course an American, but the worrying bit is that he wasn't being facetious.

 
swot
80766.  Thu Jul 20, 2006 11:31 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Quite right too, No 1.


Hurrah!

Quote:
* perhaps the most significant - it means that those prudish Americans don't have to use words like "sex".


I thought that might be why it's caught on so much in Middle England too. We don't want to talk about such activities in front of the children after all. We talked about 'gender specific' stuff in
meedja studies at school. Almost none of the teachers said 'sex' if they could possibly help it.

Quote:
I have once and only once heard someone refer to two people "having gender" when he meant "having sexual intercourse". The person who said it was of course an American, but the worrying bit is that he wasn't being facetious.


That's just plain creepy.

 

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