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Queues (and cues and Qs?)

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RLDavies
1301561.  Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:50 am Reply with quote

Queues, as in standing in line. There have been various cultural and behavioural studies of queuing and queue-jumping. The "because" factor was mentioned by Stephen Fry in one of the earlier series, but if I remember it wasn't gone into in much detail and might be brought out again. Kate Fox in Watching the English discusses queuing as an English trait.

Queueing as in computer science, arranging tasks to be done in order.

Queue as in a long braid of hair, pigtail.

Queue is an heraldic term for an animal's tail. Which might lead into "curlicue" for a pig's tail.

Cue as in billiards. (Derived from "queue" as a variant spelling.)

Cue as in acting. (Thought to be derived from Q, abbreviation for "quando", written in an actor's script to indicate where to begin.)

The letter Q, which can lead into calligraphy and so on. The tail of the Q is technically called a tail, but if fancy can be described as a swash.

 
GuyBarry
1301562.  Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:09 pm Reply with quote

There is a thread on queues already.

Perhaps I could mention the special type of queue that exists in gentlemen's barber shops. The principle is as in any other queue - "first come first served" - but there is no physical manifestation of it, and no ticketing system. People just come into the shop, take their seat and wait, and go up to the chair in the same order as they came in. Everyone seems to know what their place in the queue is, and there's never any dispute over it. I have no idea how it works, and I don't know of anywhere else where it operates.

There ought to be a special word for it, but unfortunately "barberqueue" could easily be confused with something else :-)

 
suze
1301579.  Fri Nov 02, 2018 1:03 pm Reply with quote

How it works is simple enough, surely.

When you arrive at the shop and take a seat, you know who was already there. These people are before you in the queue, and anyone who arrives after you isn't.

You have no idea what order the four guys who were there before you should be seen in, but you don't need to know - all you do need to know is that they are before you.


Do not public houses work in much the same way? If I go to the bar to buy a drink, I know who was already waiting. If the barperson doesn't know who she ought to serve next she will ask the customers, and they are actually usually honest about it.

Now OK, being a regular customer helps and you sometimes do get served ahead of "strangers", especially if the barperson knows what you have and so you don't actually have to tell her what you require. But if I go to "our" pub tomorrow and Little Kate isn't sure whose turn it is, she'll take my word for it that Welsh Steve was there before me but Elsie wasn't.

(Little Kate is in fact of entirely normal size, but her mom also used to work at the pub and is also called Katherine. Elsie's name is actually Christine. Welsh Steve is called Steve, and is Welsh.)

 
GuyBarry
1301586.  Fri Nov 02, 2018 1:20 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
How it works is simple enough, surely.

When you arrive at the shop and take a seat, you know who was already there. These people are before you in the queue, and anyone who arrives after you isn't.

You have no idea what order the four guys who were there before you should be seen in, but you don't need to know - all you do need to know is that they are before you.


Yes, that's how I mentally deal with it. But I've never asked anyone else how they deal with it - you're just supposed to know. I worked it out for myself. It seems to be a strange piece of knowledge that's transmitted throughout the male population without ever being openly discussed.

Quote:
Do not public houses work in much the same way?


Not in my experience - I wish they did! It seems to be mainly a matter of who gets noticed by the bar staff first. I've lost count of the number of times when I've been sitting at the bar with an empty glass, and yet customers have come up to the bar and been served before me.

 
GuyBarry
1301592.  Fri Nov 02, 2018 2:33 pm Reply with quote

I was searching in vain for the (Alas) Smith and Jones sketch where Griff Rhys Jones plays the frustrated customer and Mel Smith plays the barman who's apparently unable to see him, but this is the next best thing...

suze wrote:

Now, the good husband wants to me to post this rather silly little ditty to the game.

18. Splodgenessabounds - Two pints of lager and a packet of crisps please


Many thanks to the good husband!

 
14-11-2014
1303114.  Tue Nov 13, 2018 7:40 pm Reply with quote

Traditional Dutch queues, each with an own atmosphere: Anne Frank house, Amsterdam. Ice cream shop De Hoop (The Hope), Blaricum. Efteling amusement park, Kaatsheuvel.

Dynamic: Polonaise (Conga line'ish), Eleven Cities Bicycle Tour, Bolsward (if the maximum allowed speed is 20 km/h, and the number of participants is 15000, then that's about 1 bicycle per 3 metres.

 
tetsabb
1303143.  Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:26 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Welsh Steve is called Steve, and is Welsh.)


The providers of nicknames at your pub were on cracking form when they thought of that one!
😉

 
suze
1303254.  Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:36 pm Reply with quote

He's a big lump of a guy. You wouldn't give him a remotely controversial nickname either!

 
tetsabb
1303367.  Thu Nov 15, 2018 7:09 am Reply with quote

I am intrigued to know if the dozens of your hostelry have a nickname for you, and do you know what it might be?
The Loud American was, I believe, a phrase used by one of your pupils.
😉

 
crissdee
1303395.  Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:35 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
I am intrigued to know if the dozens of your hostelry


doyens? denizens? Early shifts again mate?

 
suze
1303469.  Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:30 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
I am intrigued to know if the dozens of your hostelry have a nickname for you, and do you know what it might be?
The Loud American was, I believe, a phrase used by one of your pupils.


She hasn't done that again since I dissolved her in caustic soda.

I am aware that Sweary Suzie has been used behind my back, but I think it's mainly The Canadian.

 
tetsabb
1303497.  Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:17 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
tetsabb wrote:
I am intrigued to know if the dozens of your hostelry


doyens? denizens? Early shifts again mate?


Doyens was intended, but I had an argument with autocorrect, and it won, it seems.

And 'Sweary suze'* does not come as a complete surprise. Neither does 'The Canadian'

I have no idea if I have a nickname at work. I refer to myself sometimes as 'hairy little chubby bloke' to distinguish myself from other bearers of my name.

*I just managed to spot the autocorrect to 'sweaty' just before pressing the 'Submit' button!

 

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