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13 things that don't make sense

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gerontius grumpus
79796.  Sat Jul 15, 2006 5:24 am Reply with quote

New scientist article.
http://www.newscientistspace.com/article.ns?id=mg18524911.600

 
Mr Grue
79914.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 4:22 am Reply with quote

Number 2 seems to be another "Big Bang Theory can't account for this" issue.

 
Quaintly Ignorant
79917.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 4:46 am Reply with quote

There must be twenty lifetimes worth of mystery there. Brilliant and also ever so slightly unnerving.

 
Quaintly Ignorant
79919.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 5:00 am Reply with quote

http://www.micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/

 
Celebaelin
79921.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 6:27 am Reply with quote

Bit of a dodgy view at the nanometer scale (DNA nucleotide building blocks).

 
Mr Grue
79925.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 8:13 am Reply with quote

Quaintly Ignorant wrote:
There must be twenty lifetimes worth of mystery there. Brilliant and also ever so slightly unnerving.


I suspect a few will have closely tied solutions - The voyager probe, dark matter, dark energy and horizon problems, say...

 
Flash
79938.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 9:34 am Reply with quote

To a lay person it seems odd that they seem to say: "what we observe doesn't fit the laws we've promulgated - so the observations must be flawed" (ie there must be some other matter / energy / structures / whatever out there which we can't detect) rather than that the laws might be flawed. I'm sure this isn't happening really, but that's the way it looks.

 
djgordy
79940.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:00 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
To a lay person it seems odd that they seem to say: "what we observe doesn't fit the laws we've promulgated - so the observations must be flawed" (ie there must be some other matter / energy / structures / whatever out there which we can't detect) rather than that the laws might be flawed. I'm sure this isn't happening really, but that's the way it looks.


That is what they teach you in school science lessons. If you do an experement to confirm, say, Boyle's law, the results never actually fit the line. So the phrase 'experemental error' is invoked.

 
Mr Grue
79952.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 11:56 am Reply with quote

True. I seem to recall an interview with a scientist on the radio interested in collating "incorrect" results to experiments and trying to get science to be a bit more honest at the early academic level.

I do like the fact that the article also quotes scientists discussing how much they hope we've got the science wrong, and that some new and wonderful physics and chemistry might be just around the corner.

 
djgordy
79978.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 5:32 pm Reply with quote

Mr Grue wrote:

I do like the fact that the article also quotes scientists discussing how much they hope we've got the science wrong, and that some new and wonderful physics and chemistry might be just around the corner.


That's just because they all want to write best-selling books and be remembered as the next Einstein or Hawking.

 
Celebaelin
79984.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 6:06 pm Reply with quote

Wow. What was that about. Damned if I can remember.


Last edited by Celebaelin on Mon Jul 17, 2006 6:24 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
79997.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 8:41 pm Reply with quote

I'd dearly love the homeopathic one to be pursued, if only because it would piss off every chemist I know.

 
dr.bob
80015.  Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:17 am Reply with quote

I thought there had been a few studies into homeopathy and they had all found that there was no difference in reaction between homeopathic remedies and the placebo effect.

Now the placebo effect is something truely amazing that really does need explaining (see point 1 in the article) but I wasn't aware of any major evidence for homeopathy.

 
dotcom
80025.  Mon Jul 17, 2006 5:28 am Reply with quote

Whenever we do science experiments at school, my results never fit my hypothesis. Not ever. When we did our osmosis practical, those potato cylinders just kept on osmosing and getting heavier, even when I put them in pure sugar solution.
So a friend of mine just told me to turn my results the other way round.
And it worked.

Not really the same thing, but maybe a slapdash approach is the answer?

 
auguste
80083.  Mon Jul 17, 2006 11:42 am Reply with quote

Isn't it maddening to hear of someone spending years trying to find errors in their work? Most of us don't have to look so hard.
As for the homeopathy: isn't it really just the same as the placebo effect? After all, at that dilution, any drug is really just a placebo- all solvent and no solute.

 

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