View previous topic | View next topic

Series P: Episode 1 - Panimals

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Bondee
1295052.  Tue Sep 11, 2018 1:58 pm Reply with quote

Haven't seen the episode yet, but I do like the new homepage.

 
swot
1295064.  Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:44 pm Reply with quote

I liked it. What is the German fascination with naming all the animals after pigs?

 
Bondee
1295147.  Wed Sep 12, 2018 1:59 pm Reply with quote

swot wrote:
I liked it.


Me too! I thought Teri was brilliant.

 
Dix
1295211.  Thu Sep 13, 2018 7:05 am Reply with quote

And they're sticking to the tradition of putting something Danish in the end credits just for me!

 
Jenny
1295250.  Thu Sep 13, 2018 3:04 pm Reply with quote

Good to see Danny Baker back too.

 
Leith
1296137.  Sun Sep 23, 2018 1:33 pm Reply with quote

swot wrote:
I liked it. What is the German fascination with naming all the animals after pigs?



The German Animal Names Flowchart

English isn't averse to the odd porconym either: groundhog, hedgehog, guinea pig. And porcupine comes from the old French for "spiny pig" [etymonline].

 
Jenny
1296193.  Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:49 am Reply with quote

I love that! Stealing that for Facebook :-)

 
AlmondFacialBar
1296221.  Mon Sep 24, 2018 11:56 am Reply with quote

They forgot the German for pangolin, which is Tannenzapfentier (pinecone animal).

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
dr.bob
1296260.  Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:57 am Reply with quote

My German colleague raises an objection to the description of a Turkey as a "threatening chicken". Whilst "hahn" definitely means chicken, "trut" doesn't mean anything in German, and threatening is translated as "bedrohlich".

 
'yorz
1296261.  Tue Sep 25, 2018 5:19 am Reply with quote

AFAIK, a Hahn is a cockerel. A chicken is ein Huhn.

 
dr.bob
1296266.  Tue Sep 25, 2018 5:35 am Reply with quote

Even worse!

 
AlmondFacialBar
1296287.  Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:20 am Reply with quote

True. It's strictly speaking Truthahn for a male and Truthenne for a female, and Truthuhn for some reason only exists in academic use. The domesticated variety some people enjoy for Christmas dinner, however, is usually known as a Puter, and its female used be known as a Puthenne (so obsolete that the German nursery rhyme that mentions it has baffled at least four generations by now).

In line with the original flowchart, we do like to name species after organisms we already know. Hence the German for echidna translates into ant hedgehog, and the German for respectively possum, koala, and thylacine translates into pouched rat, pouched bear, and pouched wolf. In a nice variant of that, the German for Tasman devil translates into pouched devil, and in terms of what the animal actually does - see Stinktier - we call the Hoatzin Stinkvogel (stinky bird).

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
dr.bob
1296399.  Wed Sep 26, 2018 5:01 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
The domesticated variety some people enjoy for Christmas dinner, however, is usually known as a Puter, and its female used be known as a Puthenne (so obsolete that the German nursery rhyme that mentions it has baffled at least four generations by now).


Hence the menu item I spotted at a Bierhaus in Karlsruhe: "Putensteak"

Which, of course, my French colleague found hilarious :-D

 
Leith
1296509.  Wed Sep 26, 2018 3:22 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
My German colleague raises an objection to the description of a Turkey as a "threatening chicken". Whilst "hahn" definitely means chicken, "trut" doesn't mean anything in German, and threatening is translated as "bedrohlich".

The original article qualifies the etymology as follows:
Quote:
Trut is onomatopoeic for the trut-trut-trut cluck of a turkey, but it’s also been hypothesized that the name comes from the Middle German droten which means “to threaten”.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1296636.  Thu Sep 27, 2018 7:23 am Reply with quote

Given the historical timeline involved I find the Middle Low German etymology somewhat unlikely. Turkeys are said to have arrived in Europe in the early to mid 16th century via a southern route (most likely Spain), but suggesting that the word is derived from Middle Low German would imply that the Hanseatic League had a major hand in introducing it to Germany. As, however, the league traded almost exclusively in Northern Europe and the conquest of the Americas was actually a major cause of its downfall which was already well on its way by the time the turkey got anywhere near its sphere of influence, chances are that the vast majority of Hanseatic merchants never even got to see a specimen of that bird, let alone found themselves in the position of coming up with a name for it.

As for Putensteak - yes. *giggle*

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group