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Quick fixes

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FionaJ
1293408.  Mon Aug 20, 2018 12:00 pm Reply with quote

Hi all!

I thought we could start a thread on different quick fixes that have been used throughout history; the most disastrous quick fixes, the most extraordinary, the first of, etc.

Due to the recent series of Love Island, I thought I'd start with plastic surgery. Reportedly, interest in "quick fix procedures" such as Botox have rocketed since the 2018 TV series. This is arguably due to Megan Barton-Hanson whose plastic surgery procedures come to an estimated total of £30,000! One clinic claimed that due to Megan, there's been a 200% increase in demand for lip fillers. [1]

Yet despite this seemingly modern trend, the first mention of any type of plastic surgery appears in ancient Indian medicine.

The Sanskrit text Sushruta-samhita written by medical practitioner Sushruta (circa 600 BC) establishes the basic principles of plastic surgery and in particular outlines a skin graft ‘with surprising modernity’. [2]

The corresponding illustration shows it to be a somewhat severe procedure - a large leaf-shaped piece of skin is taken from the forehead to reconstruct the nose. (Not quite the subtlety we might want!) [3]

Within the text he also mentions: sliding graft, rotation graft and pedicle graft. Incredibly he even described labioplasty!

During the Renaissance the Italian surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi, considered by some to be the “Father of Plastic Surgery”, adopted these early methods and built upon them. According to Britannica, he “kindled a modern fascination with the use of local and distant tissue to reconstruct complex wounds.” [4]

The first use of the word ‘plastic’ in relation to these procedures came much later in 1818 when the German surgeon Karl Ferdinand von Grafe published his text, Rhinoplastik, which focused on creative reconstructions of the nose. [2]



All sources below:
[1] (https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/love-island-contestants-cosmetic-surgery-demand-increase-megan-lip-fillers-botox-a8433401.html)
[2] https://www.britannica.com/science/plastic-surgery
[3]https://www.royalfree.nhs.uk/services/services-a-z/plastic-surgery/facial-reconstruction-and-face-transplants/history-of-plastic-surgery/
[4] https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783642218361

 
Alexander Howard
1293419.  Mon Aug 20, 2018 1:11 pm Reply with quote

If we are looking at quick fixes, look up 'jugaad'.

 
Bondee
1293444.  Mon Aug 20, 2018 2:28 pm Reply with quote

We can't talk quick fixes without mentioning...



...cable ties!

Search YouTube for "cable ties hacks" and you'll find a plethora of videos, admittedly mostly crap, of things you can do around the home with cable ties.

Any mountain biker worth their salt will carry a selection of them in their backpack for a number of reasons, as Doddy from the Global Mountain Bike Network demonstrates in this video. Thankfully I haven't used any of them myself, but I did once bail out a roady with the method that's mentioned here.

 
'yorz
1293460.  Mon Aug 20, 2018 3:28 pm Reply with quote

...which reminded me of this product that was pitched in Dragons' Den about 10 years ago. Genius in its simplicity. Environment friendly.

 
FionaJ
1294410.  Mon Sep 03, 2018 9:46 am Reply with quote

Guys I found some interesting quick fixes using just ordinary objects that could really help with everyday life. As I’m sure you’re aware quick fixes, or life hacks, are extremely popular at the moment. When googling ‘life hacks’, 324 million results appear offering all manner of suggestions.

However life hacks aren’t as a new a concept as we may think. The Punjabi and Hindi colloquialism ‘jugaad’ has various meanings which includes everyday life hacks, but broadly is the concept of creating an ‘innovative fix’ or a ‘solution that bends the rules’.

Not just applied to household quick fixes, jugaad is increasingly accepted as a management technique whereby out-of-the-box thinking maximises resources with limited effort.

According to the University of Cambridge, jugaad is an "important way out of the current economic crisis in developed economies and also holds important lessons for emerging economies."

On a less serious note, here are some interesting, or slightly weird, life hacks we can all try:

CD/DVD
Apparently fix scratches on a CD or DVD by rubbing the flesh of a banana over the scratches, and then buffering the CD with the banana skin. (WHO tried this first?!)

Batteries
Increase the life of a battery by chilling it in the fridge one day before using it.

Vodka
Now this one I will try. Apparently you can transform low quality vodka into something bearable! America’s Test Kitchen filtered vodka through a water filter 4 or 5 times and found that there was a marked improvement in taste.

Filling a bucket
Instead of going through the arduous process of filling a small receptacle to then fill a bucket, simply use a dustpan! The pan can sit in the basin, filling up with water, and the handle will act as a spout and funnel the water over the edge and into the bucket.

Lacking kitchen space
If you’ve got nowhere to chop your veg, pull out a drawer and place the cutting board on top.

Perfect cutting
If you want to cut a perfect eighth of cake, roly poly or soft cheese (a window into my life), then use unscented dental floss to do so. Whether you wrap it round roly poly and pull, or cut straight down on Victoria sponge, dental floss promises equal cutting.

Frozen vegetables
As opposed to stuffing frozen vegetables in the freezer and hoping there are no runaway peas, simply hang up the bags using office clips. You can pin them to the shelf above, like washing on a line, provided the shelf is made of metal rods.

 
crissdee
1294427.  Mon Sep 03, 2018 12:15 pm Reply with quote

FionaJ wrote:
Guys I found some interesting quick fixes using just ordinary objects that could really help with everyday life. As I’m sure you’re aware quick fixes, or life hacks, are extremely popular at the moment. When googling ‘life hacks’, 324 million results appear offering all manner of suggestions.

Vodka
Now this one I will try. Apparently you can transform low quality vodka into something bearable! America’s Test Kitchen filtered vodka through a water filter 4 or 5 times and found that there was a marked improvement in taste.

"Mythbusters" tried this and an expert taster still knew the difference.
FionaJ wrote:
Filling a bucket
Instead of going through the arduous process of filling a small receptacle to then fill a bucket, simply use a dustpan! The pan can sit in the basin, filling up with water, and the handle will act as a spout and funnel the water over the edge and into the bucket.

This would not work with my dustpan, the handle is not hollow.

FionaJ wrote:
Perfect cutting
If you want to cut a perfect eighth of cake, roly poly or soft cheese (a window into my life), then use unscented dental floss to do so. Whether you wrap it round roly poly and pull, or cut straight down on Victoria sponge, dental floss promises equal cutting.

A sharp knife will also work
FionaJ wrote:
Frozen vegetables
As opposed to stuffing frozen vegetables in the freezer and hoping there are no runaway peas, simply hang up the bags using office clips. You can pin them to the shelf above, like washing on a line, provided the shelf is made of metal rods.

Or just use the clips to hold the bag closed.

 
suze
1294430.  Mon Sep 03, 2018 12:32 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
A sharp knife will also work.


As, indeed, will nylon fishing line. A guitar string would probably work too.


crissdee wrote:
Or just use the clips to hold the bag closed.


We use old fashioned spring loaded clothes pegs.

 

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