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DVD Smith
1291562.  Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:31 am Reply with quote

To start, see this thread in the P Series forum on marriage proposals (aka "popping the question").

Betteridge's Law of Headlines states that any time a newspaper or magazine headline is presented in the form of a question, the answer to that question is always "no".

There's also the possibility to put interesting stuff about polling and surveys under this theme too, like the fact that the man who introduced opinion polling to the UK called it "the stupidest of professions". [1]

According to the most famous pollster in American history George Gallup, before he introduced opinion polling to local paper the Daily Iowan, a common way of judging the current size of the readership was to remove the crossword puzzle for a week and count the number of complaints they got. [2]


Last edited by DVD Smith on Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:35 am; edited 1 time in total

 
AlmondFacialBar
1291563.  Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:33 am Reply with quote

Alternatively, misspell the local tiddlywinks champion. Yes, I speak from experience...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
tetsabb
1291589.  Tue Jul 31, 2018 12:35 pm Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Alternatively, misspell the local tiddlywinks champion. Yes, I speak from experience...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


How goes the therapy?
😉

 
DVD Smith
1291633.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 5:26 am Reply with quote

From Haggard Hawks yesterday:

Quote:
In the late 1500s, the English printer Henry Denham proposed using a reverse question mark, ؟, called a PERCONTATION POINT to indicate that a question was rhetorical and so didnít require an answer.


Not sure if this is true as I can't find any source from before "Eats Shoots and Leaves" in 2003; none of the 20th century Henry Denham biographies seem to mention it. Even if it can't be definitely attributed to him, it's a nice idea for a punctuation mark.

Arabic writing uses the backwards question mark because they read from right-to-left. [1]

Another punctuation mark was proposed in the Netherlands and uses a lightning bolt-shaped exclamation mark to indicate irony. [2]

Other proposed punctuation marks have been previously discussed here.

 
DVD Smith
1291639.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 5:58 am Reply with quote

The most-asked question on Google is "What is my IP?"

The second-most-asked is "What time is it?" >_>

https://www.mondovo.com/keywords/most-asked-questions-on-google

 
Alfred E Neuman
1291643.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 6:12 am Reply with quote

DVD Smith wrote:
The most-asked question on Google is "What is my IP?Ē


Why would 99% of users care what their IP address is?

 
Jenny
1291671.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 12:38 pm Reply with quote

Sometimes you have to enter it on a form, such as when you're setting up a new computer and adding email addresses to it.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1291672.  Wed Aug 01, 2018 12:51 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Alternatively, misspell the local tiddlywinks champion. Yes, I speak from experience...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


How goes the therapy?
😉


I'm down to two packets of tissues per session...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Ian Dunn
1300461.  Thu Oct 25, 2018 4:31 pm Reply with quote

A Japanese anime cartoon has helped to solve a 25-year-old mathematical problem.

The anime in question is The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, a sci-fi comedy about a schoolgirl who is blissfully unaware of the fact that she has the God-like power to change all reality. For example, because she believes in aliens, ESPers and time travellers, they exist, and three of her best friends are these people, but they never reveal their true identites to her for fear of what Haruhi might do with her powers. The only other person to know about this is a fifth friend, a normal boy who acts as the story's narrator.

When the first TV series aired back in 2006, the episodes were not shown in chronological order. However, home video releases reordered the episodes. Thus, there has been debate among fans as to what is the correct order to watch the series. This lead to a message being posted on the website 4chan back in 2011: "which way is the most efficient way to watch every possible order of The Melancholy on Haruhi Suzumiya's 14 episodes?"

It turns out that this question relates to something called "superpermutations", a mathematical problem that has been going on for 25 years. One of the earliest examples is mentioned in a journal from 1993 by Daniel A. Ashlock and Jenett Tillotson.

In the senario involving this anime, which has since been dubbed "The Haruhi Problem", a permutation is any order of the 14 episodes. A superpermutation is watching every single permutation in one go.

Although a formula for calculating the shortest superpermutation has yet to be found, a lot of work has been made thanks to the Haruhi Problem, and steps have been made to calculate the largest possible superpermutation.

In terms of the anime, the shortest possible superpermutation for watching The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya would mean a person would have to watch 93,884,313,611 episodes.

As is pointed out by the Anime News Network, this is fitting as one of the other storylines in the series, the "Endless Eight", sees that characters being trapped in a timeloop.

 

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