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Things E

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gerontius grumpus
79737.  Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:13 pm Reply with quote

Enchondroma
Endometriosis
Endoplasmic reticulum
Elephantiasis
Erysipelas
Ergotism
Epinephrin
Elodea canadensis
Eschericia coli
Euglena
Ellington colliery
Edge hill, battle of
Exeter ship canal
Ehrlenmeyer flask
Eugen, Prinz
E pluribus unum
Egremont russett
Eiffel tower lemonade crystals
Empire flying boats

 
samivel
79740.  Fri Jul 14, 2006 4:21 pm Reply with quote

Duke Ellington

 
swot
79935.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 9:24 am Reply with quote

Epps, Omar. Come on, we've got to shoe-horn House in somehow.

Englebert Humperdinck, classical composer

Englebert Humperdinck, crooner

Edwin Firth Snr: bandsman, soldier, composer, generally qi chap. By hook or by crook there'll be some brass band related interestingness somewhere dammit.

Ludovico Einaudi. Not so much interesting as ever so slightly strange, but hey.

Elton, Ben. If we tried very hard we might think of something nice to say about him.

Elton John. See above.

 
gerontius grumpus
79967.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:05 pm Reply with quote

Not forgetting Edward Elgar, there must be plenty of interesting stuff about him.

 
gerontius grumpus
79969.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:23 pm Reply with quote

Gloster E28/39 is also very interesting.

 
brianl
80002.  Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:10 pm Reply with quote

I propose

Establishmentarism

Eruditeness

Elixirs

Engineers

Entrapment

Id be happy to dig up/share interesting tidbits on these. I will of course keep my eyes peeled for other E words as appropriate. Thanks for making occasionally dull research more fun.

 
Icarus
129167.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 2:27 am Reply with quote

Etymology

Looking through a truly amazing book I picked up in the bookshop earlier this month, The Origins of English Words: A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, I stumbled upon the possible connection between dogs and cynics. But there are other ideas. I couldn't possibly improve upon Shipley, so I quote below:

Quote:
The word cynic may be from Cynoserges, a gymnasium where Antisthenes taught Diogenes and others. Diogenese lived in a tub; when Alexander the Great asked what he could do for him, Diogenese replied: "Stand from between me and the sun."


S:Shipley, Joseph T., The Origins of English Words: A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, 1984, The Johns Hopkins University Press, London

 
Icarus
129168.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 2:41 am Reply with quote

Etymology

More from Shipley:

Quote:
elekhtron is Greek for amber: rubbing that produced man's earliest acquaintance with electrical phenomena - except for lightning, not identified until Benjamin Franklin flew his kite. The word electric was coined in 1600 by the English physicist William Gilbert to denote substances that, like amber, attract other substances when rubbed.


So much comedic potential there...

S: Ibid

 
Icarus
129169.  Wed Dec 27, 2006 2:58 am Reply with quote

Etymology

Shipley goes through the periodic table of elements and one tidbit definitely lept out. 4 elements are named for one town in Sweden, Ytterby.

They are, with their respecitve atomic number and symbol,

Yttrium (39, Y)
Terbium(65, Tb)
Erbium (38, Er)
Ytterbium (70, Yb)


S: Ibid

 
legspin
130903.  Tue Jan 02, 2007 8:30 pm Reply with quote

Icarus wrote:
Etymology

Shipley goes through the periodic table of elements and one tidbit definitely lept out. 4 elements are named for one town in Sweden, Ytterby.

They are, with their respecitve atomic number and symbol,

Yttrium (39, Y)
Terbium(65, Tb)
Erbium (38, Er)
Ytterbium (70, Yb)


S: Ibid


On the topic of the elements
A question about the song 'The Elements' by Tom Lerher.
The last line mentions that the lyrics name all the elements or at least all those that have been accepted by Harvard U.
What has Harvard accepted since the song came out?

 
Jawr256
131080.  Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:26 pm Reply with quote

legspin wrote:
What has Harvard accepted since the song came out?


Lawrencium (1961)
Rutherfordium (1964)
Dubnium (1967)
Seaborgium (1974)
Bohrium (1981)
Hassium (1984)
Meitnerium (1982)
Darmstadtium (2003)
Roentgenium (2004)

I think

Although Ununbium, ununtrium, ununquadium, ununpentium, ununhexium and ununoctium have also been synthesised but don't have proper names yet.

 
suze
131092.  Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:05 pm Reply with quote

Yup, I reckon you're right - 102 elements were known to Harvard when Tom Lehrer wrote The Elements in 1959, and nine more have been named since.

It's interesting that no claim has yet been made for the discovery of ununseptium. There seems to be no particular reason to suppose that it can't be synthesised, but it seems not to have been.

There don't seem to be any claims beyond 118 either, although element 123 once featured in an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation; it was alleged to be called jamesium. Similarly, 126 has been supposed to be kryptonite - and there is a chemical theory which predicts that it might be relatively stable (half life in the thousands of years).

If I knew more about sub atomic physics than I do, I could explain why it is that elements of higher number than 138 seem unlikely to be possible. As far as I do understand it, the laws of physics imply that the electrons within an atom of element 139 or higher would have to travel faster than the speed of light - and this cannot be.

 
tetsabb
131093.  Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:10 pm Reply with quote

I think it was a SciFi film called The Core, in which a drill made to get deep into the Earth is made from 'unobtainium'.
Lovely.

 
grizzly
131166.  Wed Jan 03, 2007 7:42 pm Reply with quote

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unbihexium

 
CaptTimmy
131167.  Wed Jan 03, 2007 8:29 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
I think it was a SciFi film called The Core, in which a drill made to get deep into the Earth is made from 'unobtainium'.
Lovely.


Wiki wrote:
In the movie The Core, one of the characters invented a material to build the hull of the craft that dug to the Earth's core he explicitly dubbed this material unobtainium (due to its real name having 37 syllables). Unobtainium also is mentioned as being used in a probability-field weapon in the Uplift Saga by David Brin.

Wiki wrote:
As stated above, Unobtanium is commonly used in many science fiction settings. Recently, the 2003 motion picture The Core, portrayed a deep drilling craft composed of a material dubbed "unobtanium" by its developers (due apparently to its unwieldy technical name, and its exceptionally unusual properties). The hull remains solid at deep Earth temperatures that would melt or even boil other metals, is a near-perfect thermal insulator, and remains usually unaffected by the intense pressures that would exist within the Earth. The only time in which the hull seems to be affected by pressure is when it would add dramatic tension. The unobtainium metal in this movie is also able to convert heat directly into usable energy; this violates the second law of thermodynamics.


Right on the money tetsabb.

 

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