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DVD Smith
1284854.  Wed May 23, 2018 7:55 am Reply with quote

Q: Who originally said the phrase "with great power comes great responsibility"?

[Klaxons: Spider-Man, Uncle Ben]

A: The phrase "with great power comes great responsibility" is usually attributed to Spider-Man – including in 2015 by the US Supreme Court. [1] However, it was actually first used during the French Revolution in 1793, and first appeared in English in Hansard (the UK Parliamentary speech records) in 1817, spoken by future Prime Minister Viscount Melbourne. There's also a similar phrase in the Bible, although it doesn't specifically mention power. [2]

Thanks to the 2002 film, the phrase is most commonly associated with the Spider-Man character Uncle Ben (his Wikipedia page comes up if you Google the phrase), but the phrase's origins in the comic do not come from any one character, but simply appear in a caption box narrating the story. [3]

 
Snowywebb
1288527.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:22 pm Reply with quote

It would be a wonderful world if it was practiced.

 
crissdee
1288529.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:24 pm Reply with quote

I am currently wearing a shirt with the words;

"With great beard comes great responsibility"

written on it.

 
Snowywebb
1288531.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:28 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:


"With great beard comes great responsibility"


Do you sport facial hair... should we call you Gandalf?

 
crissdee
1288532.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:31 pm Reply with quote

Me? No! Whatever made you think that!

 
Snowywebb
1288540.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:54 pm Reply with quote

My omnipotent omniscient omnipresent figment of imagination!!!

It Is Gandalf!!!

 
Snowywebb
1288541.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:58 pm Reply with quote

Hey Gandalf, how they hangin’?

 
suze
1288570.  Fri Jun 29, 2018 5:05 pm Reply with quote

I cannot hear the name Gandalf without giggling, which is almost entirely the fault of one Mr J Eggshaped of this parish. With a bit of help from the good folks of the Democratic Unionist Party, maybe.

Way back in the days of I Series, the said Mr Eggshaped was investigating the topic of I for Isogloss, and he happened on a website (no longer extant, sadly) which explored informal names for the male member.

I dare say that all of us know a few informal names for that, and you probably won't be amazed to discover that in most of Britain, the most commonly used is "willy". Except in Northern Ireland, apparently, where 39% of men said that they called that thing their "Gandalf".

 
Snowywebb
1288594.  Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:38 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:

I dare say that all of us know a few informal names for that, and you probably won't be amazed to discover that in most of Britain, the most commonly used is "willy". Except in Northern Ireland, apparently, where 39% of men said that they called that thing their "Gandalf".


Errrr this could be awkward...

It would be culturally insensitive to infer, even accidentally as in this case, that one to whom one is referring, that one does not really know at all, is a ‘dick’...

One can only hope the above mentioned ‘Gandalf’ does not hale from Northern Ireland.

 
suze
1288596.  Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:40 am Reply with quote

Don't worry about that, he's a Londoner.

And not a dick.

 
crissdee
1288604.  Sat Jun 30, 2018 3:46 am Reply with quote

Thank you suze! That's always nice to hear!

 
14-11-2014
1291736.  Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:11 am Reply with quote

Q: which crew said "Houston, we have a problem".

A: United Television's, in 1974.

IMDB's trivia: "Movie includes actual radio transmissions from the Apollo 13 flight (that's actually Jim Lovell and crew you hear)".

 
AlmondFacialBar
1291737.  Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:23 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
I cannot hear the name Gandalf without giggling, which is almost entirely the fault of one Mr J Eggshaped of this parish. With a bit of help from the good folks of the Democratic Unionist Party, maybe.

Way back in the days of I Series, the said Mr Eggshaped was investigating the topic of I for Isogloss, and he happened on a website (no longer extant, sadly) which explored informal names for the male member.

I dare say that all of us know a few informal names for that, and you probably won't be amazed to discover that in most of Britain, the most commonly used is "willy". Except in Northern Ireland, apparently, where 39% of men said that they called that thing their "Gandalf".


Whereas in exactly one small part of the Republic of Ireland (not the one where I live) that particular part of the male anatomy is colloquially referred to as the relic.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
GuyBarry
1298768.  Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:35 am Reply with quote

This could form an interesting "double klaxon" question:

Who was the originator of the line "Ringo Starr isn't the best drummer in the world. He's not even the best drummer in the Beatles"?

It's sometimes attributed to John Lennon, but there's no evidence that he ever said it. It's more often credited to Jasper Carrott in 1983, who did use it in a TV routine.

But now I learn that a version was used in an October 1981 episode of BBC Radio 4's Radio Active, written by Angus Deayton and Geoffrey Perkins:

https://www.thepoke.co.uk/2018/09/11/really-said-ringo-wasnt-best-drummer-beatles-wasnt-john-lennon/.

So it seems that Jasper Carrott may have copied it, either deliberately or inadvertently. As a Radio Active fan I should have picked that up a lot earlier!

 

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