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Quirky Q-words

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DVD Smith
1283596.  Tue May 08, 2018 8:46 am Reply with quote

Quimp - The name for any celestial symbol (e.g. moons, planets) used to disguise expletives in comic strips. Other non-planetary censorship symbols were known as jarns, nittles or grawlixes. [1] - This whole article is fascinating by the way, goes into the terminology for all kinds of comic strip art tricks.

Quobbled - The description for when your fingers crinkle from overexposure to bath water. [2]

Quaquaversal - Going off in all directions from the centre (like a firework).

Quomodocunquizing - Making money through any means possible. (Used once in 1652 by Thomas Urquhart, hasn't been used since.) [3] [4]

Quasimodo Day - The Sunday immediately following Easter Sunday. The name comes from "quasi modo geniti infantes" (like newborn infants), the first words of the Catholic mass traditionally spoken on this day. The protagonist of The Hunchback of Notre Dame is named Quasimodo because he is discovered as an abandoned infant on Quasimodo Day. [5]

Quinquagesima Sunday - The Sunday immediately preceding Ash Wednesday.

Quaestor - A position in Ancient Rome that started out as murder investigator, but eventually evolved into government treasurer. [6] [7]

Quiddler - Someone who wastes time doing pointless tasks. [8] [9]

 
Jenny
1283622.  Tue May 08, 2018 2:27 pm Reply with quote

DVD Smith wrote:


Quiddler - Someone who wastes time doing pointless tasks.


That looks familiar to me!

 
DVD Smith
1283723.  Thu May 10, 2018 5:15 am Reply with quote

A bunch of good Scottish ones, taken from the Dictionary of the Scots Language:

Quaisterin (n) - Someone who mooches and scrounges off their friends.

Queef (n) - An engaging, roguish girl / a conjuring trick. (Much better than the English-language definition!)

Queeple (n) - The peeping cry of a small duckling. (Also a verb, to cry like one.)

Queeter (v) - To work lazily, to trifle and waste time.

Quinter (n) - A female sheep in her third year. (Evolution from "twinter" - one who has seen two winters.)

Quird (n) - A lump of excrement.

Quoit (v) - To play a game of curling. (Also a curling stone.)

 
DVD Smith
1283725.  Thu May 10, 2018 5:33 am Reply with quote

According to The English Dialect Dictionary of 1905, the word "quean" meant both "A woman; a term of endearment for a little girl" and "an immoral woman, a shrewish or dirty woman; a prostitute".

 
AlmondFacialBar
1283728.  Thu May 10, 2018 6:23 am Reply with quote

DVD Smith wrote:
Quasimodo Day - The Sunday immediately following Easter Sunday. The name comes from "quasi modo geniti infantes" (like newborn infants), the first words of the Catholic mass traditionally spoken on this day. The protagonist of The Hunchback of Notre Dame is named Quasimodo because he is discovered as an abandoned infant on Quasimodo Day. [5]


In the German liturgical calendar, even the evangelic version, the Sundays are still known by their full Latin names. Hence we also have Quinquagesimae (fifty days before Easter) and Quadragesimae (forty days before Easter) - neither of which actually are that amount of time before Easter. The confirmation kid version of Quasimodogeniti is: "Quatsch nicht, Mutter, geh nicht schief." (Don't jabber, mother, don't walk crooked.) A mnemonic as good as any I guess.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
DVD Smith
1284509.  Sat May 19, 2018 10:43 am Reply with quote

The Quechua language is spoken by indigenous peoples from the Andes region of South America. The English words quinoa, cocaine, llama, puma, guano and condor all come from Quechua originally.

Source

 
tetsabb
1284521.  Sat May 19, 2018 12:11 pm Reply with quote

And the Quechua are welcome to take back their quinoa...

 
Alfred E Neuman
1284527.  Sat May 19, 2018 2:23 pm Reply with quote

... but we'll keep the cocaine?

 
Brock
1284549.  Sun May 20, 2018 3:00 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:

In the German liturgical calendar, even the evangelic version, the Sundays are still known by their full Latin names. Hence we also have Quinquagesimae (fifty days before Easter) and Quadragesimae (forty days before Easter) - neither of which actually are that amount of time before Easter.


Quinquagesima (as it's generally spelt in England), meaning "fiftieth", occurs seven weeks before Easter. So it's the fiftieth day before Easter if you adopt the Roman practice of "inclusive counting", where the days at both the beginning and the end of the period are included. (It's the same basis on which English "fortnight" corresponds to French "quinzaine".)

Quadragesima ("fortieth") is six weeks before Easter, but also forty days before Good Friday, which may be the basis for the name. However I can see no obvious justification for Sexagesima ("sixtieth") and Septuagesima ("seventieth"), which occur eight and nine weeks before Easter respectively. I presume the names arose by analogy.

 
DVD Smith
1286068.  Tue Jun 05, 2018 10:45 am Reply with quote

A quakebuttock is an old English word for a coward.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/noun-plus-verb-rare-obscure-insult-generator/quakebuttock

 
DVD Smith
1286935.  Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:26 am Reply with quote

A bunch of 18th/19th-century insults and slang, courtesy of the Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue from 1788-1823:

"(In the reign of) Queen Dick" - Never.

Queer as Dick's Hatband - Suffering from an as-yet-undiagnosed illness.

Queer plunger - Con artist who would throw themselves in a river and are then "rescued" by a friend, who takes the 'plunger' to a local hospital for drowned people, where they are rewarded with money the friend for the rescue, and the 'plunger' as an encouragement to dispel any more 'suicidal' thoughts. (More info here - [1] [2])

Queer rooster - One who eavesdrops on thieves by pretending to be sleeping.

Quilldriver - A (much more badass) term for a scribe.

 
bobwilson
1287095.  Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:55 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! An ecstasy of fumbling,


Probably the most evocative line in English poetry - EVER - (well, imo).

 
Bondee
1287108.  Sun Jun 17, 2018 4:20 am Reply with quote

Queynte.

Chaucer would probably think I was a bit of a cunt if I didn't mention it.

 
Gabby Lister
1287146.  Sun Jun 17, 2018 8:47 am Reply with quote

Quaff-tide - meaning the season for drinking
Quackhood - 18th century word, the state of being a "quack"

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/quackhood

https://www.wordsandphrasesfromthepast.com/blog/quaff-tide

http://mentalfloss.com/article/64012/40-quirky-q-words-add-your-vocabulary

 
DVD Smith
1290302.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:56 am Reply with quote

Quinzhee - An igloo-like structure made of soft, loose snow.

Quadrophobia - Like tetraphobia, the fear of the number 4. (More QI stuff about this phobia here.)

Quiggly hole - A round hole in the ground indicating the presence of an old structure built by indigenous natives of British Columbia, Canada.

Quadrophenia - A four-way split personality, via a distortion of "schizophrenia". Coined by Pete Townshend for the Who album of the same name.

Quire - A bundle of twenty-four (or sometimes just four) sheets of paper.

 

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