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The Giving-Up Syndrome

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'yorz
1281163.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 6:51 pm Reply with quote



Article

Quote:
The Swedish word uppgivenhetssyndrom sounds like what it is: a syndrome in which kids have given up on life. That's what several hundred children and adolescents have done ó literally checked out of the world for months or years. They go to bed and don't get up. They're unable to move, eat, drink, speak or respond. All of the victims of the disorder, sometimes called resignation syndrome, have been youngsters seeking asylum after a traumatic migration, mostly from former Soviet and Yugoslav states. And all of them live in Sweden.

Quote:
The children go into these comalike states when their families are notified that they will be deported. The only known cure is for their families to receive residency permits allowing them to stay in Sweden. It's not a sudden, magical reawakening when family members read the approved residency permit in the nonresponsive child's presence. Somehow, the information gets through. While there are no long-term follow-up studies, Aviv says, over a period of days, weeks, sometimes a few months, the child begins to eat, move, react and come back to the world.


Horrendous. And I wouldn't be surprised if this syndrom were to spread to other countries where families are living in these hopeless conditions. Utterly shameful.

 
Snowywebb
1288149.  Tue Jun 26, 2018 2:56 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Horrendous. And I wouldn't be surprised if this syndrome were to spread to other countries where families are living in these hopeless conditions. Utterly shameful.


What do you think is the solution yorz?

 
Jenny
1288221.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:28 am Reply with quote

Maybe I just have a nasty suspicious mind, but I would like to know how these children and adolescents manage to survive while being unable to eat or drink, and how those beds stay so clean while they are unable to communicate a need to go to the bathroom.

 
swot
1288226.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:51 am Reply with quote

I see nasogastric tubes in the photos, perhaps there are catheters and whatnot that you can't see.

 
'yorz
1288234.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 8:56 am Reply with quote

Snowywebb wrote:
Quote:
Horrendous. And I wouldn't be surprised if this syndrome were to spread to other countries where families are living in these hopeless conditions. Utterly shameful.


What do you think is the solution yorz?


Is that a serious question? Just look what's happening at the Mexican border. It's bleedingly obvious what's wrong and what could/should be done to prevent such calamitous reactions.

 
Snowywebb
1288235.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 9:08 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Is that a serious question? Just look what's happening at the Mexican border. It's bleedingly obvious what's wrong and what could/should be done to prevent such calamitous reactions.


You are talking to an Aussie... we donít let them in in the first place and if they do get in we send them back or put them on tropical islands in the Pacific so they can terrify the locals.

I think we got tired of them owning later model iPhones than we had.

 
Snowywebb
1288237.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 9:25 am Reply with quote

I should add that yes we have lots of open space in the Outback but the reason there is lots of open space is no one wants to live there, not even refugees.

We tried it... :(

 
dr.bob
1288242.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 10:21 am Reply with quote

Snowywebb wrote:
I should add that yes we have lots of open space in the Outback but the reason there is lots of open space is no one wants to live there, not even refugees.


You also have lots of space in your cities.

According to this website, the state capital with the highest population density is Melbourne, with 450 people per sq km.

According to this pdf file (slide 3), population densities for the smaller UK cities include Leeds (1,388 people per sq km), Sheffield (1,532 people per sq km), and Edinburgh (1,873 people per sq km). In comparison, Melbourne looks awfully roomy :)

 
Snowywebb
1288243.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 10:21 am Reply with quote

Iím giving up and going to bed.

(Itís 1.20 am here :)

 
dr.bob
1288244.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 10:26 am Reply with quote

Sounds like a sensible plan.

Sleep well :)

 
Dix
1288277.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 1:56 pm Reply with quote

It's an odd one. As far as I know this still hasn't been reported anywhere else. There seems to be a suggestion that the Swedish procedure at the time allowed people that had been refused asylum to reapply several times so that the process could drag on for many years. This, apparently, is what was changed in 2006.

Using the magical superpower of being able to google in and read Swedish: Here's an excerpt from an official report from 2006 on the subject. It's some facts and figures and most of the conclusion.
Apologies for the google translate mistakes; I've left most of them in because I think the rather quaint choice of words can be understood in the context.

At the beginning of March 2006, 65 asylum-seeking children with dismissal symptoms were being treated at the country's child and adolescent psychiatric units. At the same time, another 82 children, who had previously been asylum seekers and who have now been granted residence permits, were also current. A follow-up in April 2006 shows that this figure has fallen to 59 in almost a month (about 28% decrease). Children's recovery almost always occurs after a granted residence permit. A majority of the asylum-seeking children still in attendance come from the former Soviet Union and former Yugoslavia. More than 58% of children are between 8-15 years old, about 8% are under 8 years and almost 11% are over 16 years. About 69% of the children live with both of their parents and in about 27% of the cases, there are single mothers who moved here with their children.

--

In summary, it can be seen that none of the explanatory models and hypotheses that have been presented in recent years by different categories of experts alone can explain the phenomenon. All studies so far have confirmed that this is a phenomenon that is linked to certain ethnic groups from certain particular geographical areas of the world. In our survey we have found that the problem is unknown in the countries of origin, both among the majority population and among the ethnic minorities in question. It has sometimes been argued that traumatic experiences / stress and difficult family situations are the cause of the problem. This statement is contested by empirin in this study as well as the fact that a large number of children / parents in other places / times have been exposed to the corresponding without the phenomenon occurring. The fact that there are too many variations in children's stories (state of health, class, ethnicity and religion, etc.) and in their state of affairs (different degrees of morbid behavior during different periods, different types of response to care etc.) make it even more difficult to find a single explanation why these children have ended in a state of enactment. However, there are still common names, that is, the majority of the children come from the former Soviet Union and former Yugoslavia; that all children showed dismissal symptoms after 2001; that symptoms have only been developed in Sweden and that the children have been healthy in their home countries as well as in the other Asian countries they lived in earlier - and most importantly: the only effective measure for child recovery has been a granted residence permit (after the introduction of the new generoser temporary asylum law this autumn, the number of asylum-seeking children with symptoms has decreased to one third).

There are no general explanations for the phenomenon's origin. However, we have come to the conclusion that the following circumstances alone or in combination can explain individual cases of children with dismissal symptoms: the asylum process and Sweden's earlier (prior to the introduction of the new procedure and procedure on 31 March 2006) ambiguous attitude in the handling of refusal decisions in asylum; individual traumatic or stressful events in the home country or in other Asian countries where several families lived before arrival in Sweden and Sweden; the child's previous mental health condition; parents' caring ability / lack of such and their lack of commitment in the child's upbringing and well-being; manipulation and simulation as well; cultural mindset and behaviors. The problem is complicated, which requires a multifactorial explanation model. That the phenomenon took an epidemic-like form for a few years is not hard to understand. It has previously happened that various mental phenomena have "broken out" for a limited time (see, for example, Hacking 2002). In addition, the dissemination can be partly explained by "copying" (Ekblad & Raundalen, 2005). The large mass media exposure of the affected children may have influenced some other children to "copy this as a solution to their own situation" with Ekblad & Raundalen's words. The great medial and social attention to the issue can therefore be regarded as a contributing factor to the epidemic-like spread of the state during the short period of time the phenomenon arose. Fortunately, we have found that the number of asylum-seeking children with abandonment symptoms has fallen drastically over the past six months. There is also good hope that there will soon be no children who suffer as we have seen that some of the affected children did.

(That last statement doesn't seem to hold - cases are still being reported, but not as many as when this report was written)

 
Snowywebb
1288310.  Wed Jun 27, 2018 6:54 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob
Quote:
You also have lots of space in your cities.

True thatís why we like to live in them.

Quote:
According to this website, the state capital with the highest population density is Melbourne, with 450 people per sq km.

Thatís surprising, Iím originally from Melbourne and have worked and lived in every state in Australia and can categorically say Sydney feels much more congested than Melbourne.

Quote:
According to this pdf file (slide 3), population densities for the smaller UK cities include Leeds (1,388 people per sq km), Sheffield (1,532 people per sq km), and Edinburgh (1,873 people per sq km). In comparison, Melbourne looks awfully roomy :)

It is... thatís why, in the past itís been called Australiaís most liveable city but I think itís had an influx of legal immigrants.
I now live about 70 km SSE of Melbourne in a bayside resort town called Mornington.

 

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