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Q Foods

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Celine
1281039.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 4:58 am Reply with quote

Upon my initial searches for the Q Series, I found some interesting foods starting with Q.

I'll post some below but maybe it would be cool to give each panellist a different Q food and ask them to say something about it, much alike the sandwiches in the Picnic episode (is that a spoiler? I'm sorry if it is...).

 
Celine
1281041.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:17 am Reply with quote

Quince

The quince fruit is a pretty cool one!

It is bright yellow, and its shape is very similar to that of a pear. However, when ripe the fruit gives off a marvellous perfume and is therefore considered a contender as the forbidden fruit that was given to Adam by Eve as it is likely Eve was attracted to the quince by its appearance and smell: 'When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye'.

Side note: It is mostly Western culture that believes the forbidden fruit was an apple due to the Bible's translation from Latin, in which the word 'evil' in the tree's name is 'mali' and apple is 'mala'. Although, the forbidden fruit could be any number of fruits, as well as metaphorical).

The quince is also believed to be the fruit that Paris gave to Aphrodite in exchange for the love of Helen of Troy, and some depictions of Aphrodite show her holding a quince. As a result of this, the quince has become a symbol of love and in the region of Thrace (now split between Greece, Bulgaria, and Turkey), newlyweds used to split a quince to eat before going to bed in order to have sweet smelling breath in the morning.

Sources:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/quince
https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/life/home-garden/2015/11/12/quince-grow-taste-forbidden-fruit/75542964/
https://www.dianekochilas.com/quince-of-the-season/

 
Spud McLaren
1281047.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:45 am Reply with quote

Celine wrote:
... in the region of Thrace (now split between Greece, Bulgaria, and Turkey), newlyweds used to split a quince to eat before going to bed in order to have sweet smelling breath in the morning.
They'd have good sets of teeth, then; uncooked quinces are a hard as a pine board.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1281056.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 6:19 am Reply with quote

And fucking disgusting. Are we sure they didn't split the fruit in a more palatable way, say as jelly, quince cheese or cake?

While we're at it, why is that supremely good crude material for any amount of delicious concoctions virtually unknown on these here isles?

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Celine
1281080.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:51 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
Celine wrote:
... in the region of Thrace (now split between Greece, Bulgaria, and Turkey), newlyweds used to split a quince to eat before going to bed in order to have sweet smelling breath in the morning.
They'd have good sets of teeth, then; uncooked quinces are a hard as a pine board.


Just had a look, quince can be eaten raw and it is quite common in the Middle East to eat it in that manner.... Alas, anything to please your new partner I suppose.

As to answer AlmondFacialBar, I found a little snippet about quinces in Greek Weddings:

'From then on quinces have been part of the Greek wedding ceremony and are often baked in a cake with honey and sesame seeds. This is said to symbolize the coupleĺs enduring commitment to each other through good times and bad. The fruits are often thrown to the bride and groom as they go to their new home and the bride is presented with a quince to ensure fertility.'

I guess it could be either...perhaps they used to eat it raw until they found it better to cook and embed into other foods?

 
AlmondFacialBar
1281085.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:16 am Reply with quote

Now there's a quince cake recipe I have to try...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Bondee
1281123.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 1:09 pm Reply with quote

Quinoa. However you pronounce it.

 
tetsabb
1281131.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 2:01 pm Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
Quinoa. However you pronounce it.


We got some of that a couple of years ago to try it. I added garlic, I added herbs, I added spices, and it still tasted little better than one imagined the box it came in would taste.

 
Dix
1281136.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 2:37 pm Reply with quote

We have some sitting in the cupboard. I haven't looked into how to cook it.

 
crissdee
1281150.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 4:58 pm Reply with quote

On the matter of Quorn. As a fully-signed up carnivore, I have little to do with the stuff, but I do see it advertised on the idiot box. When it gets to the tagline;
"Quorn is an excellent source of protein" or somesuch, my immediate thought is always;
"So's meat."

 
AlmondFacialBar
1281154.  Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:27 pm Reply with quote

Same here, but as there are actually some poor feckers who can't have meat for medical reasons, it's good to have that alternative on the market.

Q foodstuffs...

Quark
Quiche
Quesadilla
Quail
Quahog

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Alexander Howard
1281215.  Sat Apr 14, 2018 8:28 am Reply with quote

Celine wrote:
Quince

The quince fruit is a pretty cool one!

It is bright yellow, and its shape is very similar to that of a pear. However, when ripe the fruit gives off a marvellous perfume and is therefore considered a contender as the forbidden fruit that was given to Adam by Eve as it is likely Eve was attracted to the quince by its appearance and smell: 'When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye'.

Side note: It is mostly Western culture that believes the forbidden fruit was an apple due to the Bible's translation from Latin, in which the word 'evil' in the tree's name is 'mali' and apple is 'mala'. Although, the forbidden fruit could be any number of fruits, as well as metaphorical).

The quince is also believed to be the fruit that Paris gave to Aphrodite in exchange for the love of Helen of Troy, and some depictions of Aphrodite show her holding a quince. As a result of this, the quince has become a symbol of love and in the region of Thrace (now split between Greece, Bulgaria, and Turkey), newlyweds used to split a quince to eat before going to bed in order to have sweet smelling breath in the morning.

Sources:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/quince
https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/life/home-garden/2015/11/12/quince-grow-taste-forbidden-fruit/75542964/
https://www.dianekochilas.com/quince-of-the-season/


In Old English, the quince is a codŠppel. An 'Šppel' can be any fruit in some contexts. I do not know if the 'cod' bit is connected with codd meaning "bag" and, well, we still say "codpiece". Or it might be the Latin cotoneum. (The LinŠan Latin name is malum cydoneum; 'quince-apple'.)

The idea of the forbidden fruit being an apple seems to be just mediaeval painters portraying it as a generic fruit.

 
Feralcat
1281278.  Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:07 am Reply with quote

I'd have thought the cod would be as in cod latin

A 2nd rate attempt, a poor copy

Certainly in WW2 the choko was used to slice up and mix in with real sliced apple, to make apple pie stretch further when apples were hard to come by.

Also often eaten with cheese sauce, like the good old cauli

It was fairly tasteless and could be used sweet or savoury, depending on what you cooked it with.

Did they have choko in the middle ages? I should check myself

 
suze
1281316.  Sun Apr 15, 2018 5:52 am Reply with quote

Feralcat wrote:
I'd have thought the cod would be as in cod latin

A 2nd rate attempt, a poor copy


And it might very well be. There are two common explanations for that sense of the word cod; one is demonstrably untrue, while the other is fanciful but plausible.

The untrue one concerns a fellow called Hiram Codd, who was a mechanical engineer. He invented new and better kinds of corks for bottles, and then he invented a new type of bottle fastening (still made today) which reduced the need for corks. Now that he had the bottles he needed something to put in them, and he became involved with the Malvern Mineral Water Company; they didn't use such terms in the 1880s, but he was de facto CEO for three years.

As a member of the temperance movement he did not allow his bottles to be used for beer, although they absolutely were so used after his death. But it is supposed that some beer drinkers who saw no point in paying money for fizzy water disparaged his stuff as Codd's wallop, and that cod is a shortening of this term.

It's, well, codswallop. There is no citation for codswallop earlier than 1958, and there is no citation for calling beer wallop earlier than 1930. This supposed explanation is fun, but doesn't stack up.

The alternative explanation is that cod Latin is so called because it is a humorous but third rate substitute for proper Latin. It's a load of balls, in fact, from that word for a bag which Mr Howard mentions. A codpiece covers a fellow's cod (his bag ie scrotum), and so the contents of the scrotum came to be the cods. A little fanciful and there is little evidence for it, but it's plausible.

The etymology of cod, the fish, is unknown. It may also be to do with that word meaning a bag, but we don't really know why.

 
crissdee
1281324.  Sun Apr 15, 2018 8:10 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
The untrue one concerns a fellow called Hiram Codd, who was a mechanical engineer. He invented new and better kinds of corks for bottles, and then he invented a new type of bottle fastening (still made today) which reduced the need for corks. Now that he had the bottles he needed something to put in them, and he became involved with the Malvern Mineral Water Company; they didn't use such terms in the 1880s, but he was de facto CEO for three years.

As a member of the temperance movement he did not allow his bottles to be used for beer, although they absolutely were so used after his death. But it is supposed that some beer drinkers who saw no point in paying money for fizzy water disparaged his stuff as Codd's wallop, and that cod is a shortening of this term.


According to dear old Jack Hargreaves on "How" (which will raise a smile from anyone who grew up in the UK in the seventies) the "wallop" came from the firm thump needed to open said bottles.

 

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