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gerontius grumpus
78444.  Thu Jul 06, 2006 8:05 pm Reply with quote

A work colleague of mine speaks with a strong westcountry accent and the locals (Northumbrians) often mistake his accent for American.
I can't see how they make that mistake but I originate from Gloucestershire where a similar accent is spoken.

 
samivel
78447.  Thu Jul 06, 2006 8:29 pm Reply with quote

My parents are from Dorset and Somerset, and when they were on honeymoon in Italy they were often mistaken for Americans on account of their accents.

 
barbados
78499.  Fri Jul 07, 2006 10:26 am Reply with quote

Today I saw a school bus, written on the back were the words
"Caution: This vehicle stops continuously" You'd think that a council signwriter would be blessed with even the slightest understanding of the English language

 
Hans Mof
79203.  Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:00 am Reply with quote

And then there is Denglish (Deutsch+English). The misuse (or even abuse) of English in Germany. Please, have a guess, what these German words might refer to:

Handy
Moonshine Tariff
Bodybag

 
samivel
79208.  Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:28 am Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure that bodybag is used in German to mean rucksack. Which is odd, as rucksack is a German word used in English.

 
Hans Mof
79217.  Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:56 am Reply with quote

You're right samivel. Germans just can't believe that an oldfashioned word like Rucksack is used in a 'trendy' language like English. Bodybags sounds so much cooler. (Given the body temperature of traditional bodybag users, cool really is the adjective of choice)

 
QI Individual
79224.  Wed Jul 12, 2006 6:15 am Reply with quote

The use of the word 'Handy' is quite odd too. I'm not aware of this word being in use outside of Germany (or German speaking countries - I suspect it might be in use in Austria and/or Switzerland too). Apparently 'Mobiltelefon' isn't catchy enough.

 
Hans Mof
79229.  Wed Jul 12, 2006 6:35 am Reply with quote

QII is right.
The German word Handy derives from handy-talky, that's the handset-radio many people today mistakenly call a walky-talky. The military's walky-talky is anything but a handset; it is a backback (rucksack?) radio.
Nevertheless, I hate the (German) word Handy (pronounced hendee) and usually say Mobil.

 

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