View previous topic | View next topic

Hilliness [Series O: “Overseas”]

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

'yorz
1274796.  Sun Feb 18, 2018 2:03 pm Reply with quote

Good analogy - but then a lot biggerder :-)

 
Bondee
1274800.  Sun Feb 18, 2018 2:27 pm Reply with quote

Giant current ripples. I've heard/read Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson mention them in relation to the Missoula floods in the north-western US at the end of the last ice age. I'd have to let a geologist say whether this is the case for Denmark too.

 
'yorz
1274801.  Sun Feb 18, 2018 2:32 pm Reply with quote

Hmm. In my memory, they were not as long, and closer together.

 
crissdee
1274820.  Sun Feb 18, 2018 5:57 pm Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
........biggest wind turbine.........at 195m.


Is that measured to the "hub" or to the highest point the rotors reach? Either way, that sounds like a biggie!

 
Dix
1274827.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 2:35 am Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
I am very puzzled. In the early '80s I made a roundtrip to Denmark aboard a huge truck, delivering seedling plants to farmes across that country. One of my abiding memories is parts of the rural landscape that I then described as being 'like short, choppy, waves'. No idea what the more scientific name for such landscape would be but I'd think it's rather descriptive. Certainly not overall flat.


The term is moraine landscape.

Amended link - this one works


This link covers Jutland, where the ice rim was. It's exposed to the wind from the North Sea so it's pretty bleak in places. The eastern parts of Denmark were totally ice-covered (= lots of clay deposits) have much more lush vegetation. Couldn't find a good single online source for piccies of that.


(and yeah, I made a typo when i typed in the height of Himmelbjerget earlier. Sorry.)

Edit: thanks to 'yorz for help with the link.


Last edited by Dix on Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:02 am; edited 1 time in total

 
'yorz
1274836.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 4:20 am Reply with quote

new attempt to post link

You should have typed an = in stead of ] :-)

 
Baryonyx
1274842.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 4:39 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Has anyone here been to Gibraltar? It is the least flat territory in Europe, slopier even than Liechtenstein in the heart of the Alps. (Unsurprisingly, the slopiest "full sized country" in Europe is Switzerland.)


I vaguely remember being told once by the BBC that Spain was Europe's most mountainous country. Not equivalent to least flat I admit, but I wondered perhaps what alternative measure one would use to calculate Spain's 'mountainous-ness'.

 
Dix
1274864.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 8:00 am Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
new attempt to post link

You should have typed an = in stead of ] :-)


How odd. I tried both versions and got nowhere. Must have been another typo :-)

 
Bondee
1274891.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:52 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Bondee wrote:
........biggest wind turbine.........at 195m.


Is that measured to the "hub" or to the highest point the rotors reach? Either way, that sounds like a biggie!


It's the height of the blades at the top of their stroke, known as the "tip height". In a turbine this size it's measured from "wave (or water) level" because they're usually installed offshore.

 
suze
1274906.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:09 pm Reply with quote

Baryonyx wrote:
I vaguely remember being told once by the BBC that Spain was Europe's most mountainous country. Not equivalent to least flat I admit, but I wondered perhaps what alternative measure one would use to calculate Spain's 'mountainous-ness'.


Number of mountains, possibly? Spain is twelve times the size of Switzerland, so it wouldn't be surprising if it had more mountains but also some big flat bits (the ones where the rain mainly falls, I suppose). Big flat bits are not a heavily populated category in Switzerland.

 
GuyBarry
1274911.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:29 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Spain is twelve times the size of Switzerland, so it wouldn't be surprising if it had more mountains but also some big flat bits (the ones where the rain mainly falls, I suppose).


Thank heavens for Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rain_in_Spain

Quote:
Spanish rain does not actually stay mainly in the plain. It falls mainly in the northern mountains. In Spanish, the phrase was translated as La lluvia en Sevilla es una maravilla (The rain in Seville is a miracle). The lyric about Hertford, Hereford, and Hampshire contains an implicature (but not an entailment) that hurricanes ever occur at all in these areas. This implicature is false, as the only hurricane force (≥64 knot) winds that do occur in these areas (in Britain) result from extratropical cyclones, which differ from hurricanes in their causes and dynamics.


I hope that was intended to be funny.

 
suze
1274941.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 4:41 pm Reply with quote

Oh yes, I was just being silly. I know little of Spanish geography beyond Barcelona and the Canary Islands, but big flat bits are in fairly short supply in those areas as surely as in Switzerland.

Of the relative precipitation and topography of the rest of Spain, I have no useful knowledge.

 
GuyBarry
1274942.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 4:47 pm Reply with quote

I wasn't referring to your contribution, I was referring to the anonymous Wikipedian who thought it necessary to point out that the lyrics to the song weren't to be taken literally!

 
Spud McLaren
1274945.  Mon Feb 19, 2018 4:57 pm Reply with quote

I'd suggest it was Babbage, were he not a little to early for Wiki.


Last edited by Spud McLaren on Tue Feb 20, 2018 2:27 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
cornixt
1274998.  Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:12 am Reply with quote

I was once laughed at for living in a house on the only hill in Norwich. Firstly, it was the side of a valley, so the opposite of a hill, and secondly, there was an actual hill nearer the city centre that was almost as steep.

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group