View previous topic | View next topic

Turnips

Page 1 of 1

david5901
1271559.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:46 am Reply with quote

In the latest TV show (Series O: 12 The Occult), Aisling Bea correctly identified the "turnip" as the traditional vegetable used in Ireland (and Scotland) for making Hallowe'en lanterns.
Unfortunately, the picture that was displayed to illustrate the answer showed swedes not turnips. At least, they are swedes if you come from Scotland or the north of England.
In the south of England, turnips are the small things that look a bit like large radishes and have white flesh, and swedes are the large things that have orange flesh.
But in Scotland, the north of England and, I assume, Ireland, its the other way around. The switch seems to happen somewhere in Yorkshire.
If you made a lantern from a south of England turnip, it would be a tiny sad thing. But up north, we used to get especially large Scottish turnips for making lanterns. Almost as large as a human head, which is what it was meant be (Celts had a thing about heads).
So be sure to get the right type to make the neeps for your haggis on Wednesday.

 
dr.bob
1271585.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:29 am Reply with quote

Blame the sassenach elves responsible for sourcing the images.

 
Jenny
1271615.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:39 pm Reply with quote

Here in Maine, what I grew up calling a swede (with orange flesh, although I grew up in Yorkshire) is called a rutabaga.

 
suze
1271643.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:10 pm Reply with quote

The "turnip line" is said to be moving slowly north.

There has been no formal academic work on this question, although there probably should have been. But a number of forums have asked their members what they call this vegetable and where they're from.

The big orange thing is called a turnip in Newcastle upon Tyne and Middlesbrough, but it's called a swede in Darlington and Hull. In Sheffield it has apparently become a swede within the last 20-30 years having previously been a turnip. On the left hand side of the country, it is said to be a turnip in Carlisle and in Barrow in Furness, but a swede in Lancaster.

Everywhere south of the places mentioned calls it a swede, except for Cornwall where it's a turnip. The EU has ruled that to use the name "Cornish pasty" your meat pie must contain only beef, potato, onion, and turnip (and rather a lot of pepper, if you are the largest commercial maker of these particular comestibles), but that turnip here means the big orange thing.

I grew up calling the big orange thing a rutabaga, but them I'm foreign. Mind you, the makers of Branston Pickle have always called the base ingredient of their product rutabaga as well. Surely this isn't because British people would be less inclined to buy the stuff if they knew it was made of swede ...?

In those parts of the country where the big orange thing is called a turnip, what is the smaller white thing called?

 
crissdee
1271644.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:16 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
...........the country where the big orange thing is called a turnip.............


Now there's a youlgreave waiting to happen!

 
david5901
1271681.  Tue Jan 23, 2018 9:58 am Reply with quote

When I grew up in Edinburgh, the small white things were called Swedes and the big orange things were Turnips.
So the exact opposite of southern England.
P.S. thanks for all the detail about the "turnip line".[/quote]

 
Spud McLaren
1271703.  Tue Jan 23, 2018 12:49 pm Reply with quote

I have an idea that there might've been a bit of confusion due to today's turnips being smaller than those of yore. I'm sure that when I was of school age there was little difference in size between a swede and a turnip. Even today, looking at the packs of soup/stew veg one can buy pre-packed in supermarkets, the bits of turnip have evidently come from a vegetable rather larger than the whole turnips sold by the same shop.

I also remember that a Hallowe'en lantern then was made from a swede or a turnip. An adult had to do the main work, because hollowing out either one of those things with a sharp implement is bloody hard and quite dangerous work.

 
tetsabb
1271711.  Tue Jan 23, 2018 2:42 pm Reply with quote

To me, a swede is orange, and tougher than the white turnip.
Raised in Yorkshire, but most of my cooking has been done in Sussex, so waddiiknow?

 
suze
1271760.  Tue Jan 23, 2018 6:03 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
I also remember that a Hallowe'en lantern then was made from a swede or a turnip. An adult had to do the main work, because hollowing out either one of those things with a sharp implement is bloody hard and quite dangerous work.


Presumably pumpkins were not at that time readily available in Britain. Husband tells me that when he was a small boy in Lincolnshire he never got to do this because his parents thought it a silly American custom, but some of his peer group used a mangelwurzel for the purpose.

I doubt this happened very much except in Lincolnshire and Norfolk, simply because that vegetable isn't grown a great deal in the rest of the country.

 
Jenny
1271813.  Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:42 pm Reply with quote

What's the difference between a mangelwurzel and a swede (orange) or turnip (white)? I always thought it was another name for swede.

 
Spud McLaren
1271814.  Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:46 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
What's the difference between a mangelwurzel and a swede (orange) or turnip (white)? I always thought it was another name for swede.
http://herbs-treatandtaste.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/mangel-wurzel-confusing-vegetable.html

 
Jenny
1271819.  Wed Jan 24, 2018 1:39 pm Reply with quote

Thank you Spud - I've learned something today!

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group