View previous topic | View next topic

Abdomen vs. Stomach

Page 1 of 1

JNorton
1271541.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:06 am Reply with quote

During the O Series episode "Odds And Ends" a question is asked during the General Ignorance round of, "Where are your fattest fat cells?" Alan's answer is, "Well, I suppose you want to say on your stomach." He is told that he is "absolutely right" and it is elaborated that the adipose tissue cells in our midriffs expand but don't actually increase in number. Sadly however, I believe both of these responses are debatable, if not fully incorrect.
Regarding Alan's answer, and judging from the information then discussed, his answer of stomach is incorrect due to the fact that it is used to refer to the lower section of the human torso which is actually called the abdomen. The term stomach only defines a single digestive organ within the abdominal cavity. The term abdomen should have been used in this case because it is the correct term for the section of the human body extending from below the chest down to the pelvis. The abdomen contains numerous organs including the stomach, liver, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, small intestine, and the large intestine. It is fat within the abdominal cavity, visceral fat, which is of greatest concern as the fat is far below the skin and has attached itself to the vital organs contained therein. (https://www.britannica.com/science/abdomen) (https://www.britannica.com/science/stomach)
Regarding the information given that visceral fat increases in size but not in number, there have been studies which show that while they do expand in size, they have a limited expansion point and will then split to allow for more growth. Unless you are privy to newer published research than I have seen (which is highly likely, and if such is the case, would you be so good as to let me know the reference, so I may update my medical knowledge base with the study) the research available is that all fat cells do increase in number, though the various types do so at different rates. (http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpendo.00265.2004)

 
Jenny
1271616.  Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:42 pm Reply with quote

AFAIK, the number of fat cells increases but never decreases. This is a source of great sadness to me.

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group