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Elevator

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mckeonj
76085.  Wed Jun 21, 2006 3:49 pm Reply with quote

...or LIFT if you live this side of the Atlantic.
There must be a lot of interesting stuff about elevators, which doesn't include elevator shoes.
I have travelled in various kinds of lift, some more interesting than others. I think the most awesome one was an aircraft lift on a carrier, and the most interesting one was the old 'paternoster lift' at St Thomas's Hospital. That one is a non-stop lift with no doors, just an endless chain of cars travelling up and down adjacent shafts, with openeings at each floor.
You just step in as the car comes level, then step out at another level. I decided to stay inside for the 'over the top', to see if the car flipped over.
It didn't.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paternoster
But my all time favourites are the big old hydraulic ones in old London, the ones with the double trellis doors and the wheezy old operator.
I also have fond memories of the cliff lifts (technically, they are funicular railways) at Bournemouth, which used to be gravity operated by weight of water. Very neat idea that, zero energy cost.
Unfortunately they have been converted to electric motors.
http://www.catnip.co.uk/tracks/funicular/
I recently enjoyed a trip up to and up the Eiffel Tower in Lisbon (yes, Lisbon) by the 'Elevadores', firstly up the slope by funicular, then up the tower by elevator.
http://tinyurl.com/klnd4
There is a lot of stuff about Elisha Otis and the safety lift; start here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elevator

and, lest we forget, "Miss Otis regrets", a song by Cole Porter, inspired by a lift, I think.
Search page: http://tinyurl.com/npyww

 
Gaazy
76120.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:40 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
the most interesting one was the old 'paternoster lift' at St Thomas's Hospital. That one is a non-stop lift with no doors, just an endless chain of cars travelling up and down adjacent shafts, with openings at each floor.

These were provided in the medical school where one of my pals at University studied. I was never able to pluck up the courage to use them, and thank fervently that the Music department was all on one floor.

 
djgordy
76121.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:45 am Reply with quote

There were (and presumably still are) paternoster lifts at Leeds University too. They are so much more efficient at transporting people than ordinary lifts, although a bit tricky for people who aren't quick on their feet.

 
mckeonj
76142.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 7:10 am Reply with quote

The 'London Eye' big wheel, which revolves with rotating cars, and operates non-stop, is also a 'paternoster lift'. Getting on and off is quite fun.
I am not sure why the lift is called 'paternoster'; obviously from 'Pater Noster', the first words of the Lord's Prayer in Latin; but whether from the idea of praying before entering, or from a chain of rosary beads, I know not.


Last edited by mckeonj on Thu Jun 22, 2006 7:18 am; edited 1 time in total

 
djgordy
76143.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 7:13 am Reply with quote

I think it is because the cars are strung out on the drive chain like the beads on a rosary.

 
Tango 1
76146.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 7:40 am Reply with quote

The most disappointing lift I went in was to the top of the TV tower in Berlin last September. It's entirely internal, no windows and boring. The view at the top however, is breathtaking.

 
Flash
76161.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 9:34 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I also have fond memories of the cliff lifts (technically, they are funicular railways) at Bournemouth, which used to be gravity operated by weight of water. Very neat idea that, zero energy cost.

There's one in Folkestone which still uses water, but it isn't zero energy cost because they have to pump the water up to the car at the top.

 
QI Individual
76172.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 10:36 am Reply with quote

The Lynton & Lynmouth Cliff Railway is also a (free energy) water driven funicular that is still operational. The lift is now a listed monument and the buildings have been listed to Grade II.



There's also a much more elaborate description by the real enthousiasts.

This is a nice detail. The tracks are laid so close together (less work to build the thing I guess) that there's a section in the middle with a small siding so the cars can pass each other without colliding.

 
captainzlog
76187.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 11:51 am Reply with quote

Space Elevators - now there's a thing!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_elevator

 
Gray
76226.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 1:28 pm Reply with quote

Schindler's Lift.

 
tetsabb
76227.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 1:32 pm Reply with quote

When I worked at Gatwick, and was told that a new lift had been installed by Schindlers, my reaction was, "You are having me on". I bet they leurve Stephen Speilberg.....

 
barbados
76240.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:18 pm Reply with quote

The fastest elevator in the world is at the 1010 metre Taipei Tower the worlds tallest building.
It will take you from bottom to top in 1 minute, that's not far off 60mph.

The lift is driven by a two-winding permanent magnet synchronous motor at takes 38 seconds to get to it's maximum speed going up, it is of course easier for the lift to go up full than down empty, the maximum speed down is 600 metres per minute.

Because of the quick changes in pressure there is a pioneering pressure regulation system, the first time this technology has been used on a lift. Another ground breaking technology used on this lift is the roller guides. Because of the height and speed the minor distortions and undulations on the guide rails are greatly exagerrated so they have had to load the rollers on special spring mechanisms to counteract this giving a comfortable ride.

The temperature generated by the braking system exceeds 1000 degrees centigrade so a new silicon nitride ceramic material has been developed to prevent fade, although the majority of the braking is carried out by the motor with the shoes main purpose is to hold the lift in position, hence if the brakes squeak it is not inconceivable for the engineer to rectify the problem by oiling the drum.

 
Gaazy
76245.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:35 pm Reply with quote

My father worked down the coalmines during the war (he was a 'Bevin Boy', one of the percentage of conscripts who were randomly chosen to be miners etc. rather than being called up for military service).

In the mines, the cages were just dropped down until the brakes were applied; my father said that he always thought, when deceleration occurred, that the winchman had changed his mind and had started pulling the cage up.

No matter how many times he descended, he and the others couldn't shake off this weird feeling that they were going up whereas in fact they were still going down, albeit more slowly than a few seconds before.

 
mckeonj
76260.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 4:04 pm Reply with quote

I bet you didn't know that there is a famous song about a funicular railway. Anyone over 60 will know this. Under 60's will find the full story here:http://tinyurl.com/hcsg8

 
jimmyc99
76263.  Thu Jun 22, 2006 4:48 pm Reply with quote

barbados wrote:


The lift is driven by a two-winding permanent magnet synchronous motor at takes 38 seconds to get to it's maximum speed going up,


Sounds more like the technology used is some modern rollercoasters and other thrill rides.

Does "Superman the Escape" count as an elevator? :D

 

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