View previous topic | View next topic

English placenames

Page 14 of 14
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 12, 13, 14

ikkan
147580.  Thu Feb 15, 2007 2:16 pm Reply with quote

The pronunciation of Place Names, as with all language, does indeed change over time. Some modern pronunciations are nothing like the original name and can sometimes be highly misleading as to the etymology. Also, some identical place names can be pronounced differently in different places. For example Chicester. The city is pronounced 'chi' like in 'chip' with a short 'i', but the part of South Shields in the NE is 'chi' like 'ch - eye'.

 
costean
147608.  Thu Feb 15, 2007 3:22 pm Reply with quote

costean wrote:
the coat of arms of Coventry had an elephant and howdah as far back as the 13th century.


It has come to my attention that the Coat of Arms of Bolton also has an elephant and howdah (castle) and I wouldn't want the good people of Bolton to feel in any way marginalised.

Quote:
The elephant and castle which were also in use before the grant of 1890. These are held to derive from the arms of Coventry, with which Bolton has links going back to the middle of the 13th century when Bolton Church was annexed as a prebend to the cathedral Church of Lichfield and came under the authority of the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry

http://www.civicheraldry.co.uk/lancs_ob.html

In fact they seem to be very proud of their elephants and Bolton Metropolitan Council has produced an activity booklet called The Elephant Trail.

Pictures of elephants in Bolton - for those (probably very few) still interested.

 
HasBeany
166287.  Sun Apr 15, 2007 8:18 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
But what about Greenwich ("gren itch" or "grin idge" - "green witch" is confined to New York).


Beggin yer pudding ... but as a New Yorker who actually lived in The Village, but has lived over here for getting on 40 years ... NO ONE refers to Greenwich Village as anything but

"Gren itch" Village ... and if they do, they sure ain't from NYC!

Ditto for Greenwich, Connecticut - a very posh suburb.

Everybody does, however, eat a "sand witch" and not a sannitch ;)

 
suze
166314.  Sun Apr 15, 2007 11:11 am Reply with quote

Your pardon begged in return. It must be fifteen years since I've been to The Village, and of course one doesn't use the place name a great deal while one is actually at the place.

But in Talkin' New York, Bob Dylan definitely refers to it as "Green Witch" - and it's from there that I drew the earlier inference. So apologies if it's non standard.

 
HasBeany
166317.  Sun Apr 15, 2007 11:29 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Your pardon begged in return. It must be fifteen years since I've been to The Village, and of course one doesn't use the place name a great deal while one is actually at the place.

But in Talkin' New York, Bob Dylan definitely refers to it as "Green Witch" - and it's from there that I drew the earlier inference. So apologies if it's non standard.


I think he was proving that not all Americans think irony has to do with shirts :)

He's from the mid-West, where they do tend to come up with their own pro-noun-see-ey-shuns. Mind you, I've yet to meet a Brit who knows the difference between Houston, Texas - pronounced the same as John Huston, film director ... and South Houston Street - pronounced House-ton.

Most Brits call her Bet Davis, when it's Betty and I don't care that it's spelled Bette. But Bette Midler IS called Bet. Go figure!

Then there's Busby Berkeley -- which is pronounced Berk-lee, same as Berkeley, California. No rhyming slang need apply :)

Funny old world, innit?

 
suze
166320.  Sun Apr 15, 2007 11:49 am Reply with quote

As a fellow North American (I'm from Vancouver, but like yourself live in south east England these days), I know all about some of the strange pronunciations found in North America.

For instance, there's a road in downtown Vancouver called Broughton Street.

Most English people would imagine this to be "Bror-tuhn"; while my husband's first attempt was "Broh-tuhn" (by analogy with the publishing firm of Hodder and Stoughton). But both wrong - it's "Brow-tuhn".

 
HasBeany
166328.  Sun Apr 15, 2007 12:20 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
As a fellow North American (I'm from Vancouver, but like yourself live in south east England these days), I know all about some of the strange pronunciations found in North America.

For instance, there's a road in downtown Vancouver called Broughton Street.

Most English people would imagine this to be "Bror-tuhn"; while my husband's first attempt was "Broh-tuhn" (by analogy with the publishing firm of Hodder and Stoughton). But both wrong - it's "Brow-tuhn".


We're in danger of straying VERY off topic. Maybe we should start a new E topic: Etymology and Pronounciation and sneak in these tiny gems. BTW - we may be in shouting distance -- I'm on the Kent/E. Sussex border immediately south of Tunbridge Wells!

 
Jenny
166357.  Sun Apr 15, 2007 2:20 pm Reply with quote

The town of Woolwich in Maine was historically pronounced the same way as the south London area - Wool itch, with the emphasis on the first syllable. However, there are so many incomers these days that the pronunciation has changed and newer people pronounce it Wool witch, with a fairly even stress on both syllables.

 
Lumpo31
166427.  Mon Apr 16, 2007 3:56 am Reply with quote

HasBeany wrote:

I'm on the Kent/E. Sussex border immediately south of Tunbridge Wells!


Anywhere near the Ashdown Forest? Lovely bit of the world you've got there!

Lisa

 
'yorz
734723.  Thu Aug 19, 2010 4:57 am Reply with quote

Hans, as you're a self-confessed Angle, what is the Dutch province Zeeland's coat of arms motto doing as your signature? :P

 
Hans Mof
734724.  Thu Aug 19, 2010 5:00 am Reply with quote

I'm a world citizen ;)

... and I happen to like it.

 

Page 14 of 14
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 12, 13, 14

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group