View previous topic | View next topic

Can the Mugabes bounce back?

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Alfred E Neuman
1261709.  Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:04 pm Reply with quote

While there is no shortage of incompetent and/or morally bankrupt heads of state in the world it seems we may have one less today.

No one seems 100% sure if there's actually been a coup in Zimbabwe or not, and things are peaceful in Harare according to my colleagues up there, but the army apparently have Bob locked up and Grace has fled to Namibia.

 
Alexander Howard
1261735.  Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:08 pm Reply with quote

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
While there is no shortage of incompetent and/or morally bankrupt heads of state in the world it seems we may have one less today.

No one seems 100% sure if there's actually been a coup in Zimbabwe or not, and things are peaceful in Harare according to my colleagues up there, but the army apparently have Bob locked up and Grace has fled to Namibia.


What do we know about those taking over? The Beeb suggests it is not so much Stalin-replaced-by-Khrushchev as Stalin-replaced-by-Beria.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1261741.  Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:06 pm Reply with quote

I think for anyone to attempt to get rid of Mugabe, they will need a significant power base, and I fear you may well be correct.

 
barbados
1261747.  Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:48 pm Reply with quote

Obviously, you are closer than most to the action so to speak, however the talk on the radio on the way home from work was that the action was taken to prevent Mrs Mugabe from taking over as Mr Mugabe is too frail to continue.

Apparently Mrs M has now fled, and it is quite likely that Mr M will be granted safe passage to join her.

There was also quite a lot of comment about the South African supposed peacekeeping offers, the general concesus from the Zimbabweans that phoned in was they should act in the same way they have for the last 18 years, and keep out.

 
Jenny
1261775.  Wed Nov 15, 2017 9:56 pm Reply with quote

Given that Robert Mugabe is 93, I can't see him, personally, doing much bouncing. His wife is a different issue.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1261790.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:19 am Reply with quote

barbados wrote:
Obviously, you are closer than most to the action so to speak, however the talk on the radio on the way home from work was that the action was taken to prevent Mrs Mugabe from taking over as Mr Mugabe is too frail to continue.


Closer physically, but Iím pretty sure the BBC is at least as, if not more, accurate as the local stuff we see. As I type this, Iím in a video conference with our office in Zimbabwe, but their connection is so poor I havenít heard a single intelligible word from their side beyond a muffled Ďyesí.


barbados wrote:
There was also quite a lot of comment about the South African supposed peacekeeping offers, the general concesus from the Zimbabweans that phoned in was they should act in the same way they have for the last 18 years, and keep out.


Weíve been keeping out for longer than that havenít we? Either way, Iím not really sure that we have the military capacity to either keep or indeed break the peace anymore. Some of the peacekeepers we sent to Rwanda a while back got held up by thieves and had their cellphones, cash and weapons stolen from them.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1261792.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:23 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Given that Robert Mugabe is 93, I can't see him, personally, doing much bouncing. His wife is a different issue.


Heís been trying to get her in as his successor, which would be a bit of a disaster. Sheís a nasty piece of work.

https://m.news24.com//SouthAfrica/News/grace-mugabe-assaulted-me-with-an-extension-cord-model-20-claims-20170814

 
barbados
1261796.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:47 am Reply with quote

Quote:


Weíve been keeping out for longer than that havenít we? Either way, Iím not really sure that we have the military capacity to either keep or indeed break the peace anymore. Some of the peacekeepers we sent to Rwanda a while back got held up by thieves and had their cellphones, cash and weapons stolen from them.

Most of the callers were ex-pats, so I suppose it was their memory of the need for intervention. The impression I got from the conversations was that, SA are now trying to intervene, when the Zimbabweans have done what was needed so they may as well keep out now.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1261803.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 3:58 am Reply with quote

Iím not seeing anything in the local media about intervention. I think Zuma said something, but he was probably told to relax by his owners.

The local media seem more interested in the fact that France are hosting the rugby World Cup in 2023, and the widespread snow weíre having in early summer.

 
dr.bob
1261832.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:47 am Reply with quote

There was an interesting interview with a couple of Zimbabwean politicians on Breakfast news this morning. One was from an opposition party, and he was talking very vaguely about a transition to a new form of government, though he was pretty light on details about what form this would take.

The other was a pro-ZanuPF guy, and he was at pains to point out that the power struggle was basically between 3 different branches of the Zanu PF party. One of them is headed by Grace Mugabe, and the other two were not keen on her taking over. This guy was pretty clear that, once the dust settles, Zanu PF would still be the party in charge of the country, it just might be a slightly different make up of the government.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1261843.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:41 am Reply with quote

Thatís why some people are saying that itís not a coup - the ruling party is still ruling, theyíll just be putting forward a new leader and president.

Hopefully with Mugabe gone, the next election will be more free and fair than the last few, which may open the door for the opposition.

 
Alexander Howard
1261942.  Thu Nov 16, 2017 12:37 pm Reply with quote

The odd thing about Mugabe is that although he turned the breadbasket of southern Africa into the basket-case of southern Africa, leaving people starving in the villages and streets and being murdered by the state, he has remained wildly popular. He never won a single election fairly, but he had millions of devoted followers, many of whom were prepared to defend him to the last drop of someone else's blood.

Perhaps if there can only be some openness, a sort of coming-to, then Mugabe's rule can be seen for the horror it was. There is a brief window to get it right, so that country can begin to open up and prosper, as it did before his time.

Junk the whole Mugabe legacy and thrive. I might even come and enjoy a holiday in Southern Rhodesia.

 
Alexander Howard
1262028.  Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:22 am Reply with quote

I've just see the video of the meeting between General Chiwenga and the President:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h42kzEA9l8Q

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
1262577.  Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:24 pm Reply with quote

The military should have put him under house arrest years ago for all those rigged elections.

 
crissdee
1262602.  Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:53 pm Reply with quote

I don't envy his successor, trying to clean up that mess and get the country financially stable again.

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group