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Introduction of gay marriage in Great Britain

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tetsabb
1290311.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:45 am Reply with quote

suze wrote
Quote:
"little old ladies


50 or over. I presume.
😉

 
GuyBarry
1290318.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:00 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:

The way the question is framed in France, I think the proper response is je le veux ("I want it").


Clearly a bit more down-to-earth than over here!

 
suze
1290321.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:01 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
50 or over. I presume.


That's right.

As from Friday, the definition of "old" will be changed to 51 or over.

When the definition of "little" will be changed in such a way as to include me, who can say.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1290322.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:08 pm Reply with quote

The Latin senex is said to have applied from the age of 45. I guess we'll just have to deal with it...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1290371.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:40 pm Reply with quote

But life expectancy at birth in Classical Rome was about 35 years. Accordingly, a person became a senex upon reaching 129% of life expectancy at birth.

Life expectancy at birth for a person born in Canada in 1968 was 72 years. Therefore, I won't be "old" until I am 93. Since I hardly expect to reach that age, it would seem that I am destined to be a teenager forever!

 
AlmondFacialBar
1290373.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:02 pm Reply with quote

Works for me... My Latin teacher, who must have been in his early fifties back then, insisted there was a typo in our textbook and it should actually say 55, and I haven't the slightest doubt that he kept correcting the textbook further year after year until he retired. Hence I think he would approve of your approach.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
'yorz
1290376.  Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:15 pm Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
suze wrote
Quote:
"little old ladies


50 or over. I presume.
😉


Oi! 'Little old ladies' to me are bent-over, rheumatic, black-clad, white-haired, wart-nosed, old biddies of 80+.

 
dr.bob
1290492.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 5:13 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
dr.bob wrote:
If all they're doing is saying "I do" (or "je fais") and signing a contract, then they might as well do what we do here and fold that into the religious ceremony.


The way the question is framed in France, I think the proper response is je le veux ("I want it"). Just oui would make perfect sense as surely as "yes" would here, but it's not quite the done thing.


After posting my original point, I had a vague memory of saying "I will" rather than "I do" at my wedding. I'm not sure why, but I think it might have been some kind of Catholic vs Anglican thing.

I also had a vague memory that saying "I do/will" was legally required to make the marriage legal, so I did a bit of digging. It seems I wasn't quite correct. According to an english council website I found, there are actually two phrases that must legally be spoken during the wedding ceremony. Without them it seems that the marriage would be null and void.

The first phrase are the Declaratory Words which take the form "I do solemnly declare that I know not of any lawful impediment why I [name] may not be joined in matrimony to [name]." This then needs to be followed by the Contracting Words, which take the form "I call upon these persons here present, to witness that I [name] do take thee [name] to be my lawful wedded wife / husband."

This pdf file from Edinburgh states that, north of the border, there's an additional bit of business to cover at the start of the ceremony: namely the "Identification" where the person conducting the ceremony needs to say the following:

Quote:
Before I proceed with this civil marriage ceremony the law requires that I must ask both the parties to the marriage to formally identify themselves in my presence and in the presence of their witnesses.

Therefore, ........... can you now confirm that your name is.....................
Therefore, ........... can you now confirm that your name is.....................


This is for a civil ceremony but, since it's a legal requirement, I would imagine the same rules apply for a religious ceremony.

The other odd thing in Scotland is the amount of paperwork involved. When I got married I rocked up at a church, signed a form, and buggered off on honeymoon. Apparently in Scotland you need to fill in the Marriage Notice Form, also known as the M10 (ahh, how romantic), no more than three months and no later than 29 days before your wedding date. This needs to be submitted along with both of your birth certificates (no photocopies) and, if either of you has been previously married, the registrar will also need to see your divorce, annulment or death certificate to prove you’re free to marry again.

During the actual ceremony, you'll sign the "Marriage Schedule". In a civil wedding, this is provided by the registrar. However, for a religious wedding, it's your responsibility to collect it from the register office during the week before the wedding. You then have to hand this Schedule in to the register office within three days of the wedding, which is handy if you're about to vanish on honeymoon :-S

Going back to the "I do/will" question, the closest I can find to it now is the Declaratory Words which can also take the form of the person conducting the ceremony asking the person about to be married "Are you ......... free lawfully to marry ........?” at which point they can reply "I am".

 
swot
1290495.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 5:42 am Reply with quote

Oh yes. So much paperwork, and so much to pay for it. I had to pay over the phone with my credit card for the initial chat with the registrar, then we had to pay when we went to the office to show her our birth certificates, then it cost ALL OF THE MONEY for the registrar to go to the venue and perform the service (would have been less than £50 if we'd married in the register office, but it would have been less pretty, so...). The words can be a bit different though. I'll see if we kept the booklet with the service advice on it (we went with the civil marriage, obvs).

 
swot
1290496.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 5:51 am Reply with quote

I must have finally chucked it out. It had three variations on the legal set of words, with more or less for the couple to say (either you could say the relevant words, or the registrar could say them and then you agreed to them). I presume they do it this way so that people with dreadful speech impediments don't have to stumble through a long couple of sentences when they can just say "Yes".

 
cornixt
1290513.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 10:16 am Reply with quote

For my Kentish civil wedding, "I do" was not an option. I forget what the other one was, but we settled on the "I will" series of answers.

During the service, the celebrant went on for a while with a long speech then suddenly stopped. At this point I realised that we were supposed to give a joint response but neither of us had been paying attention so we didn't. I blurted out "Er, we will?" while my almost-wife just looked confused and everyone else nervously laughed. After a bit of confirmation that we'd both just zoned-out and weren't having second thoughts, we got a do-over and I tried to pay a bit more attention after that.

 
Jenny
1290516.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 10:46 am Reply with quote

We got married overlooking the ocean in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Conveniently this was at a nice hotel which also catered the reception. The person performing the ceremony was a Unitarian minister. We (being old and sentimental types) actually rather liked the wording of most of the C of E wedding service, but we rewrote it to take Jesus out of it.

 
suze
1290525.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:39 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
After posting my original point, I had a vague memory of saying "I will" rather than "I do" at my wedding. I'm not sure why, but I think it might have been some kind of Catholic vs Anglican thing.


I think it's more of a British / American thing. The form of marriage given in the Book of Common Prayer prescribes "I will", and so that is conventional in Britain. "I do" is more common in North America, and people who haven't been married tend to think that it's "I do" because it's what they've seen in the movies.

In practice though, unless you are a member of the Royal Family and your wedding is live on television, the priest or registrar isn't going to get upset if you say the wrong one. After all, Diana got Charles's name wrong when they were married live on television, and neither party tried to use this as ground for annulment.

In all honesty, I can't remember precisely what I said either time!


NB Was this on the show once? Stephen asked (something like) "What do you say when you get married", and there was a klaxon for "I do"?

 
Alfred E Neuman
1290533.  Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:49 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
In all honesty, I can't remember precisely what I said either time!


I used “Yes dear” during the rehearsal for my second one. The bride warned me not to try that on the day...

 
GuyBarry
1297237.  Tue Oct 02, 2018 5:37 am Reply with quote

At long last, the Government has announced that civil partnerships will be extended to opposite-sex couples:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-45714032

 

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