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suze
1253801.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 5:18 am Reply with quote

GuyBarry wrote:
(Actually I don't hear "East Wales" very much, but Wikipedia says it exists.)


I am reliably informed that at one time there was an East Wales Cricket League. It covered Monmouthshire and Cardiff, but not the rest of Glamorgan west of Cardiff.


Quote:
Do you know why they chose "South", but "Western"?


Although its official name is Western Australia, don't Australians actually call it West Australia quite a lot of the time?

 
crissdee
1253827.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:51 am Reply with quote

I'm in East Wales now, being in the border town of Hay-on-Wye. In fact, I could walk to England from here in about 20 mins.

 
GuyBarry
1253862.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 12:39 pm Reply with quote

This is probably why "East Wales" isn't generally referred to as such - it's usually called "the Welsh borders" or something like that. It seems to be a much less common term than "North Wales", "South Wales", "West Wales" and "mid-Wales".

 
Alfred E Neuman
1253871.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 1:48 pm Reply with quote

Or just England?

 
suze
1253873.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 2:25 pm Reply with quote

It's not used much if at all any more, but at one time Scotland was often referred to as "North Britain".

One of the last vestiges of that was the North British Railway. That company operated some of Scotland's railways (extending as far into England as Berwick upon Tweed and Carlisle), and built both the Forth and Tay bridges.

It ceased to exist under that name in 1923, but the North British Hotel adjacent to Edinburgh Waverley station - both of which had been owned by the railway company - kept that name until 1988. It is by now owned by Rocco Forte and his celebrity niece Alex Polizzi, and does business as the Balmoral Hotel.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1253883.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 2:53 pm Reply with quote

I've stayed in a Balmoral Hotel. In Durban. Actually I've stayed in a Killarney Hotel too, also in Durban.

 
GuyBarry
1253888.  Sun Oct 08, 2017 3:23 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
It is by now owned by Rocco Forte and his celebrity niece Alex Polizzi, and does business as the Balmoral Hotel.


And still keeps its clock three minutes fast so that people don't miss their trains.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1253940.  Mon Oct 09, 2017 3:58 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Not really, although note that we do sometimes say "Northwest Europe". That term means different things to different people, and just about the only constant is that it includes Belgium and the Netherlands.


*nods* Geographically you can't get much more Northwest Europe than here. Culturally, however...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1255307.  Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:06 pm Reply with quote

Awitt wrote:
Two of Australia's states and one territory are also named geographically: South and Western Australia and the Northern Territory.


Don't forget, also, Northwest Territories in Canada and South West Africa of course.

And also East Timor, which retained that moniker after its forced incorporation with Indonesia in 1975.

 
suze
1255358.  Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:04 pm Reply with quote

duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
Don't forget, also, Northwest Territories in Canada and South West Africa of course.


Northwest Territories does not occupy the north western part of Canada. Until Nunavut was created in 1999 from part of Northwest Territories, Northwest Territories in fact occupied the north eastern part of Canada.

When Nunavut was created, there was public debate about whether the rump Northwest Territories should change its name. Denendeh and Nunatsiaq were both suggested, but found little favour outside the Dene and Inuit communities respectively. A newspaper commissioned an opinion poll, and when that poll showed that most preferred to retain the name Northwest Territories the government decided not to change it. But what came second in that opinion poll, ahead of the two indigenous names mentioned above?

(I know that barbados knows the answer to this question, so if he'd be so kind as not to reveal it just yet I should be obliged!)


duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
And also East Timor, which retained that moniker after its forced incorporation with Indonesia in 1975.


That'll be because it was and remains east of West Timor. The word Timor means "east" in any case, because the divided island of Timor is at the eastern end of an archipelago.

When Timor-Leste was a province of Indonesia its name was Timor Timur, which thus means "East East". The difference in spelling is believed originally to have arisen as an error.

 
Bondee
1255420.  Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:12 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
A newspaper commissioned an opinion poll, and when that poll showed that most preferred to retain the name Northwest Territories the government decided not to change it. But what came second in that opinion poll, ahead of the two indigenous names mentioned above?

(I know that barbados knows the answer to this question, so if he'd be so kind as not to reveal it just yet I should be obliged!)


I think I've read this on the QI home page. It was Bob, wasn't it?

 
GuyBarry
1255427.  Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:51 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
A newspaper commissioned an opinion poll, and when that poll showed that most preferred to retain the name Northwest Territories the government decided not to change it. But what came second in that opinion poll, ahead of the two indigenous names mentioned above?


Was it Boaty McBoatface?

(The real answer's on Wikipedia if anyone's interested - yes, it was "Bob". Almost as silly as calling a television channel "Dave"...)

 
Alfred E Neuman
1255432.  Sat Oct 14, 2017 4:09 am Reply with quote

Bondee wrote:
I think I've read this on the QI home page. It was Bob, wasn't it?


Which one? dr.bob or bobwilson?

 
suze
1255460.  Sat Oct 14, 2017 5:38 am Reply with quote

It was indeed Bob.

The Bob notion started with a radio jock, who set up a website outlining both sensible and silly reasons for adopting the name. It got a reasonable amount of media attention, but in reality there was never any chance that the government in Ottawa was going to let it happen.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1255486.  Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:46 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
Don't forget, also, Northwest Territories in Canada and South West Africa of course.


Northwest Territories does not occupy the north western part of Canada. Until Nunavut was created in 1999 from part of Northwest Territories, Northwest Territories in fact occupied the north eastern part of Canada.


Yukon is still not classed as a province. Apparently its population is considered to be too sparse for this to happen. After splitting from the Northwest Territory in 1898 it was named 'Yukon Territory'. The federal government's Yukon Act, which received royal assent in 2002 established 'Yukon' as the territory's official name but 'Yukon Territory' is still in popular usage and Canada Post continues to use 'YT' as the internationally-approved postal abbreviation.

The territory is not by lieutenant-governors as in all other provinces but by commissioners. Unlike LG's these are considered to be employees of the federal government rather than representatives of the Queen.

From December 1980 until his retirement in March 1986 the Commissioner for Yukon Territory was called Douglas Bell.

Actually, having just looked at a map of Canada I would say that North-east Canada consisted of places such as Labrador and Baffin Island, but I may be wrong.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukon


https://goo.gl/TR6ZL3

 

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