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Reason and benefits for hiring a professional Electricion

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crissdee
1242181.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 3:25 am Reply with quote

Tbh, I can't see how they can stop people doing their own electrical work. They can possibly prosecute you if you make a major cock up and something goes badly wrong, but not stop you trying in the first place. Fwiw, I won't ever try. Colour-blindness and wiring are not easy bedfellows!

 
'yorz
1242187.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 3:48 am Reply with quote



I do what I know I can do safely, like changing plugs, inserting a lamp switch, etc. See the picture I posted a while ago of the electric wires that I connected with the help of a chocbox (see above). Anything else, I will leave to the professionals.

 
dr.bob
1242190.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 4:06 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Colour-blindness and wiring are not easy bedfellows!


You will clearly know better than me about this, but I was under the impression that the colours of wires in this country had been carefully chosen so that even colour-blind people would be able to distinguish them.

At least, the modern ones do which, as I understood it, is why the earth wire is now stripey rather than just a solid green colour. Though I guess you'd be right to be nervous about tackling any existing wires that might be using the old colour scheme.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1242203.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 5:42 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
There are limits to what people can do, but it's not THAT restrictive. The relevant stuff is in the Part P regulations (originally 2006, relaxed a bit in 2013).

PDR


IIRC an electrical engineer is allowed to do his own electrical work over here, but unless he's registered as an electrician, can't to it for reward. Certainly this was the case when I qualified many yeaare ago, but so many laws hav changed that I'm no longer certain of it.

Also, if you sell a house, you have to provide an electrical compliance certificate, stating that the wiring is correct and safe. Of course, while a certificate is proof that an electrician got paid, it's no guarantee that the wiring has all been checked. I've seen some pretty dodgy stuff pass a compliance check, and when queried, the standard reply is "Well, everything was perfect when I checked, but that doesn't mean that someone didn't make changes after that."

 
crissdee
1242216.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:54 am Reply with quote

dr.bob, I was thinking of more complex stuff like automotive looms really. Plugs I can manage, but anything more than that I leave to someone else. Just as a general rule, I try to leave "electric string" to other people. As I always say, the difference between a pipe full of water and an empty one is obvious, a live wire and a dead wire look exactly the same, and you might only get one chance to find you are wrong!

 
'yorz
1242221.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:14 am Reply with quote

That's why there's a main switch. Would be a good idea to use it. :-)

 
suze
1242242.  Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:11 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Tbh, I can't see how they can stop people doing their own electrical work.


When it comes down to it, they can't. It's not illegal to carry out electrical work on your own home, and if you can find all the necessary equipment - not all of it can be had from Wickes - there's nothing actually stopping you from attempting a complete rewire of your home.

Only thing is, you'll probably invalidate your home insurance if you do it. If anyone (other than yourself) is injured as a result of your handiwork, you're fairly likely to find yourself in court. You'll find your home mysteriously hard to sell if you cannot present the proper safety certificates (which you can't, if the work wasn't done by a properly qualified person), and you might even find the electricity suppliers declining to supply you.

 
dr.bob
1242330.  Thu Jul 13, 2017 10:18 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
a live wire and a dead wire look exactly the same, and you might only get one chance to find you are wrong!


Meh. I've had enough 240V shocks to know they're not too bad. As long as you don't end up clasping your hand over the wire, or anything.

I've also wired up a few live wires in my time. Just be careful to not touch any metal part of the wire, or any metal part of the screwdriver you're using to connect it into place, and you'll be fine :)

 
'yorz
1242336.  Thu Jul 13, 2017 10:52 am Reply with quote

You've been lucky. Why risking harm when you can turn the juice off for the time you're fiddling with electric stuff?

 
PDR
1242339.  Thu Jul 13, 2017 11:09 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:

Meh. I've had enough 240V shocks to know they're not too bad. As long as you don't end up clasping your hand over the wire, or anything.


Me too, but you do need to be aware that it's the current-path as much as the vooltage that affects the lethality - if the current path runs through the heart or the brain you're a gonner at something like 100μA IIRC (we had lectures on this, but it was 35 years ago and the details are now hazy).

Quote:

I've also wired up a few live wires in my time. Just be careful to not touch any metal part of the wire, or any metal part of the screwdriver you're using to connect it into place, and you'll be fine :)


I've done the same, but would never recommend others do (as I'm sure you wouldn't either). A few weeks ago I replaced the kitchen 4-way light switch without switching the power off because I needed the lights on to see what I was doing (people holding torches never works for me). I did the same while wiring up the light & power sockets in the loft.

I have "electrician's" shrouded screwdrivers and many sets of proper electrician's mini-pliers with good vinyl layers over the handles, and they help. But mostly I just do as people working in hazardous situations are trained to do - I work slowly and methodically, and all movements/actions are "deliberate". If I drop anything I just look at it as it falls - I never grab for it, because that's the best way of accidently grabbing a live cable...

A quick googling will tell you that Lithium Polymer (lipo) batteries are apparently highly explosive devices which will apparently become instant incendiaries if they are not charged on a very expensive, micro-processor-controlled bespoke charger. When I got my first set of lipos I charged them on a standard bench power supply by just setting the current and voltage limits accordingly. I was able to do this because I knoew what I was doing, but I would NEVER recommend others did the same thing!

PDR

 
dr.bob
1242402.  Fri Jul 14, 2017 2:55 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
I've done the same, but would never recommend others do (as I'm sure you wouldn't either).


Depends if I like them or not ;-)

 
PDR
1242410.  Fri Jul 14, 2017 3:29 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
PDR wrote:
I've done the same, but would never recommend others do (as I'm sure you wouldn't either).


Depends if I like them or not ;-)


That's a screen and keyboard you owe my Employer.

PDR

 
PDR
1242416.  Fri Jul 14, 2017 3:46 am Reply with quote

On the wider topic (ie safety focus that is "excessive" rather than "sufficient") I put my hand on my heart and swear by His Noodley Appendage that the following is the body-text of an email that was circulated here a couple of weeks ago:

Quote:
Following a recent audit there is a need to secure the 2 and 3 tread step ladders used on the 2 nd floor to access the tall cupboards and limit their use to those who are cleared in Working at Height. This will also include the steps being placed on the 6 monthly inspection register by WPS.


Three of my colleagues happen to be "vertically exuberant" at between 6'4 and 6'7 in bare feet, and they are able to access said cupboards without mechanical aids, and they have all asked whether this means that either:

(a) they mustn't use the lower cupboards until they have been trained and cleared for Working at Depth, or;

(b) they must immediately stop moving until they have been trained and cleared for Walking at Height.

This is PRECISELY the sort of twaddle that causes the HSE to tear their hair out, because it so utterly destroys the value of all the really important good stuff they do. I can be certain about this because I (mischievously) forwarded the above email to the HSE together with the name of the external safety auditing company whose report caused it to exist...

:0)

PDR

 
Alfred E Neuman
1242423.  Fri Jul 14, 2017 4:49 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
I've done the same, but would never recommend others do (as I'm sure you wouldn't either). A few weeks ago I replaced the kitchen 4-way light switch without switching the power off because I needed the lights on to see what I was doing (people holding torches never works for me). I did the same while wiring up the light & power sockets in the loft.


I usually plug a lead light into the plug circuit and open the breaker on the lights' circuit when I'm doing that. Of course the breaker only isolates the live and you can still get a tickle from the neutral, or even trip the earth leakage if you short neutral to earth.

 
bobwilson
1242509.  Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:33 pm Reply with quote

I have something to say - but I'm too tired right now

 

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