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Ransomware, Hackers & the NHS

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bobwilson
1237682.  Sat May 20, 2017 7:22 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
I have to warn you that if you said what you put above about tyre pressures to a policeman you could find yourself charged with one of many offences. Having the correct tyre pressures is a driver responsibility and whilst they might accept that the tyre had deflated since you last checked it they would not accept that you don't know how find out what it should be. These days that is part of the written test for a license. But I digress.


Incidentally - this is a perfect illustration of my point. Correct tyre pressure is indeed a driver responsibility - and 30 psi is close enough to the standard for most cars that there should be no trouble with the lads in blue. KISS is the principle - Keep it simple, stupid.

 
bobwilson
1237683.  Sat May 20, 2017 7:26 pm Reply with quote

Oh - and one final point

Quote:
so why would you consider it ok to click on a link or download an attachment in the same circumstances at home?


Unless I've misread the technet articles - this particular attack didn't require either clicking on a link nor downloading an attachment - merely being in communication with the attacker (which is inherent in being connected to the internet) was sufficient - or maybe I've got that wrong too?

 
PDR
1237718.  Sun May 21, 2017 5:28 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:

Incidentally - this is a perfect illustration of my point. Correct tyre pressure is indeed a driver responsibility - and 30 psi is close enough to the standard for most cars that there should be no trouble with the lads in blue. KISS is the principle - Keep it simple, stupid.


I'm afraid that just isn't true, Bob. There is no "standard" tyre pressure. Each design of tyre has an optimum "contact patch"; the structure of the tyre is explicitly designed to perform with the required stiffnesses, rain-clearance etc when this contact patch area is presented to the road. The area of contact patch is determined by the weight of the car and the tyre pressure (fundamental physics). If you run over-inflated you will cause the tyre to "balloon", and lift the shoulders off the road rendering it prone to aquaplaning. If you run under-inflated then you will be flattening the angle of the tyre shoulder, damaging the carcass corners and potentially detaching the belt, whilst also messing up the steering geometry.

Many cars need different pressures front/rear, corresponding to the weight distribution. This is especially true where there are petrol and diesel models of the same car, because there is a huge variance in engine weights (diesel engines are much heavier because they need to be much stronger to take the extra compression and secondary harmonic stresses). Running the same pressures all round on a car which should have different front/rear pressures seriously messes with the road-holding - especially in the wet.

In the three cars we have my family at the moment there are a range of correct pressures. My Estate (annoyingly) has 50-aspect rubber and so uses 34psi all round when driven with just 2-4 people, but if the boot and top-box are to be filled the rears must be pumped to 37psi. My wife's MPV has full-profile tyresand uses 25psi all around for up to four people, with 29psi being needed for the full 7-people or with a filled load area. The small hatchback that is used for short trips and teaching my daughters to drive has small full-profile tyres that run at 22psi.

It takes no significant effort to know what your pressures should be. Even if you don't have an owner's handbook the pressures required by the actual tyres fitted at the factory are printed on a large label which is placed in plain sight in the door frame of the driver-side door and/or thye filler cap cover (this is a legal requirement), for example:



Its information is presented as a model of clarity that only the most actively brainless could misunderstand:



If you have a crash where the police get involved (ie where someone was injured or there was significant property damage) the police will, as a matter of routine, check your tyre pressures and examine the treads for signs of running under/over inflated. If they then ask you about it and you give the answer you gave in your post above you *will* be charged with running an unroadworthy vehicle. If you continue into the court with the same argument they they will probably relieve you of your license, but then that's probably no bad thing given your obvious contempt for your obligations in holding it in the first place.

Really Bob - you're in a hole. Stop digging!

PDR


Last edited by PDR on Sun May 21, 2017 5:34 am; edited 1 time in total

 
PDR
1237721.  Sun May 21, 2017 5:33 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:

I do think that when news organisations report that the sky is falling, it would be helpful if an authoritative source stepped in to say "actually, the news reports are - as usual - sensationalising the story and there's probably nothing for you to worry about here".

I don't expect a small business (or a home user) to be able to maintain the internals of their IT - I do expect that when news reports intimate that a nuclear missile is heading in my direction for some intelligible information to be available that points out that reports of my imminent death are greatly exaggerated - and to provide me with some straightforward steps to determine whether or not I need to call in an expert to check my system.

I don't think that's too much to ask (although it would be helpful if "news" organisations would desist from this kind of scaremongering).


I took my news on this from TV and radio (mostly BBC) and I didn't hear any "scaremongering" - I heard reports describing problems which HAD occurred in NHS and other systems, with a small sign-off at the end saying "just to remind you of the importance of keeping your updates/patches up to date".

So while I know you get a kick out of laying into the media, I don't think you have a tentacle to stand on here.

PDR

 
barbados
1237723.  Sun May 21, 2017 5:47 am Reply with quote

The problem, I think, bob is having is that he is looking at the wrong location for assistance.
There are hundreds of easy to follow guides on what to do to protect your computer / resolve the issues, but he is looking at a forum built for advanced users.
To return to the car analogy, he is using the manufacturers technical guide when he should be looking at the Haynes guide.

 
PDR
1237724.  Sun May 21, 2017 5:57 am Reply with quote

Yes, I think you have put your finger in it there.

PDR

 
barbados
1237725.  Sun May 21, 2017 6:09 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
Yes, I think you have put your finger in it there.

PDR

Thats what she said.

(Soz couldn't resist it)

 
PDR
1237726.  Sun May 21, 2017 6:39 am Reply with quote

...and that concludes the case for the prosecution, your honour...

PDR

 

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