View previous topic | View next topic

25 Useful words with no English Equivalent...

Page 1 of 17
Goto page 1, 2, 3 ... 15, 16, 17  Next

Oceans Edge
962593.  Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:38 pm Reply with quote

http://sobadsogood.com/2012/04/29/25-words-that-simply-dont-exist-in-english/

A most interesting list. I'd add "Cwtch" to the list (learned that one here and it's become a particular favourite - we've named the new home "Arthcwtch" because of it). I'm sure there's a lot more people could think of.

(might be an QI tidbit when we get to "L" - for languages)

 
PDR
962598.  Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:51 pm Reply with quote

I'd add the Finnish word "kelirikko" which you find on road signs (or at least you used to - it's been a few years since I was last there).

It means "The dangerous state of the roads during and after the spring thaw".

But I'd also dispute that there is no English equivilent of "Backpfeifengesicht" - it may not quite have made the dictionaries yet, but the common usage suggests it's "PiersMorgan".

PDR

 
tetsabb
962623.  Sat Jan 12, 2013 3:21 pm Reply with quote

One that I have mentioned hereabouts before -- noodnyi -- descriptive of the kind of person who, when you ask how they are, tells you.

And another word from Yiddish -- chutzpah roughly equates to 'bare-faced cheek', 'gall' or 'front'. As displayed by the Jewish lad who is in court on a charge of murdering his parents; he asks for leniency, as he is an orphan.

 
mckeonj
962628.  Sat Jan 12, 2013 3:50 pm Reply with quote

There are a few Romany words that are already in common English; pal is probably best known, followed by chav.
There's a couple more I know which should go into use:
chawl = Yiddish chutzpah (Cheek and chawl, get you all)
gorgoi = non-Romany person (a bit like Yiddish 'goy')
diddakoi = non-Romany traveller (Irish 'pikey')
puckatary = embarrassing predicament, e.g. falling through seat of chair, bubblegum in curly hair.

 
Awitt
962674.  Sat Jan 12, 2013 7:39 pm Reply with quote

I'll add 'vorgestern' which is German to describe 'the day before yesterday.'
At a writers meeting last March, myself and 4 others, including a linguist, debated/argued for well over an hour about this very thing.
In English, to describe 'the day before yesterday' we have to say the phrase.

 
Strawberry
962678.  Sat Jan 12, 2013 7:52 pm Reply with quote

There used to be an English word for it: ereyesterday.

 
AlmondFacialBar
962722.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 6:22 am Reply with quote

I'd like to add the word Feierabend to the list. It literally translates into feastday eve and used to be the night before a holy day, but is now the time you finish the working day and can relax. There are old folk songs dedicated to it and all. :-) Yup, we Germans take our leisure time seriously, which is also the reason why we still don't open shops on Sunday.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
zomgmouse
962747.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:59 am Reply with quote

In Russian, there's a word, "дело" (delo), which would roughly be translated to "thing that needs to be done" or "important thing"; Google translate gives "deal", "case", "matter" and several others, but none of these are accurate.

Russian also has a word "day before yesterday", as well as "day after tomorrow"; the prefix on the former can also be used to make a word that means "(the one) before (the) previous (one)".

tetsabb wrote:
noodnyi

The noun/person form is noodnik (or "nudnik", as I believe it's more commonly spelled).

 
AlmondFacialBar
962749.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:02 am Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
Russian also has a word "day before yesterday", as well as "day after tomorrow"; the prefix on the former can also be used to make a word that means "(the one) before (the) previous (one)".

tetsabb wrote:
noodnyi

The noun/person form is noodnik (or "nudnik", as I believe it's more commonly spelled).


In German we call the day after tomorrow übermorgen, in the same ilk as vorgestern. It literally translates into "when tomorrow is over". To quote Homer J. Simpson: "Those Germans have a word for everything".

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
962752.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:08 am Reply with quote

Well not quite - the germans aren't generally a cruel race, so they have no word for schadenfreude.

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
962753.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:09 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
Well not quite - the germans aren't generally a cruel race, so they have no word for schadenfreude.

PDR


*LOL*

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
962757.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:17 am Reply with quote

Very old joke - like GWB claiming that the French have no word for Entrepreneur (except that he wasn't joking).

Just been listenning to Hennig Wein on "The Unbelievable Truth" and SWMBO & I have resolved to go to one of his gigs this year.

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
962759.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:19 am Reply with quote

I've been lobbying him to do a gig in Dublin for a bit now, but so far unsuccessfully, meh...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Chowchilla
962896.  Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:46 pm Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
I'd add the Finnish word "kelirikko" which you find on road signs (or at least you used to - it's been a few years since I was last there).

It means "The dangerous state of the roads during and after the spring thaw".

But I'd also dispute that there is no English equivilent of "Backpfeifengesicht" - it may not quite have made the dictionaries yet, but the common usage suggests it's "PiersMorgan".

PDR

In Finnish you'll find a ton of nouns, pronouns and adjectives that express in a single word that which in English takes more than one word. This is because Finnish has over a dozen noun cases!

Here's some examples blatantly lifted from Wiki, seeing as I'm not a Finnish speaker:

Talo = House.
Talossa = in the house.
Taloonsa = (in)to (his/her) house.
Talolla = At the house.
Talolta = From (one) house (to another).
Talolle = To the house.
Talona = as a house.
Taloksi = Become a house (at some point).
Talotta = Without a house.

And my personal favourite:

Taloa - this is the 'Partitive' Case implying that some aspect of the house is incomplete. For example:

Maalaan Taloa = I am in the process of painting the house. This is not the same as the English "I am painting the house" because the English expression could imply something that you are about to do but haven't actually started. Furthermore, it is the noun in Finnish that changes as in all the other examples.

There's lots of languages with multiple noun cases of course and they nearly all express in one word what in English takes two or more.

 
Peregrine Arkwright
963050.  Mon Jan 14, 2013 10:26 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
Well not quite - the germans aren't generally a cruel race, so they have no word for schadenfreude.

PDR
excellent

 

Page 1 of 17
Goto page 1, 2, 3 ... 15, 16, 17  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group