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Dix
1371948.  Sun Jan 17, 2021 7:47 am Reply with quote

He's got a nerve!

Brilliant little video featuring a doctor explaining about the stupidest nerve in the human body.

 
Jenny
1371976.  Sun Jan 17, 2021 12:37 pm Reply with quote

I love that! I have saved it, thinking of the S series, because that's got both sauropod and stupid.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1373531.  Wed Feb 03, 2021 6:21 pm Reply with quote

Celebaelin wrote:

It lays claim to one of the highest temperatures ever recorded (55C unverified) and is
believed by some to be the origin of the expression 'Gahdames; that's hot'*.

https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/362/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghadames


Beginning in 1946, stamps were produced for Fezzan-Ghadames by the French, but beginning in 1949, separate issues were created for the territories. A single set of 9 definitive stamps and 2 airmail stamps were issued for Ghadames. The set was inscribed “GHADAMES, TERRITOIRE MILITAIRE” or The Military Territory of Ghadames in English. The colourful stamps were engraved with a symbol which is described as the “Croix d’Agadem”, which in reality should have been “Croix d’Agadez”, or the Agadez Cross. It is possible that the stamp designer was confusing Agadez with Agadem, which is a city in Niger at the crossroads of an important trade route. The Agazez Cross, also known as the Tuareg Cross, is a distinct design which is unique to the nomadic Tuareg people who populate the area. It is often found on Tuareg jewellery and is believed to offer protection from “evil spirits”. These beautiful stamps were used until Ghadames joined with the newly formed United Kingdom of Libya, on 24 Dec. 1951.



http://www.dcstamps.com/ghadames-french-occupation/

 
Brock
1375736.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 4:14 am Reply with quote

It's the longest day of the year! To pronounce, that is: "Saturday February the twenty-seventh" (twelve syllables).

In two days' time, it'll be one of the shortest: "Monday March the first" (five syllables).

 
PDR
1375739.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 5:06 am Reply with quote

We also seem to have dodged the plague of numerologists claiming some special significance for the "palendromic" 12th Feb (12-02-2021).

PDR

 
Brock
1375749.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 6:24 am Reply with quote

Just to add that we only get a 12-syllable date if Jan 22, Jan 27, Feb 22 or Feb 27 falls on a Saturday. Which will happen next year (Sat Jan 22), but not in 2023. So make the most of it!

 
crissdee
1375754.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 7:16 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
We also seem to have dodged the plague of numerologists claiming some special significance for the "palendromic" 12th Feb (12-02-2021).



I noticed that date, and was going to mention it as a matter of casual interest, but never got round to it. Once it had passed, it hardly seemed worth posting

 
Brock
1375756.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 7:22 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
PDR wrote:
We also seem to have dodged the plague of numerologists claiming some special significance for the "palendromic" 12th Feb (12-02-2021).



I noticed that date, and was going to mention it as a matter of casual interest, but never got round to it. Once it had passed, it hardly seemed worth posting


You'll have your chance next year (22nd Feb). If you miss that one, you'll have to wait until 2030...

 
Numerophile
1375765.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 8:36 am Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
Just to add that we only get a 12-syllable date if Jan 22, Jan 27, Feb 22 or Feb 27 falls on a Saturday.

Until we get to 2027, of course...

 
Brock
1375766.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 8:40 am Reply with quote

Numerophile wrote:
Brock wrote:
Just to add that we only get a 12-syllable date if Jan 22, Jan 27, Feb 22 or Feb 27 falls on a Saturday.

Until we get to 2027, of course...


I wasn't actually including the year in the date!

If you include the year, today is "Saturday February the twenty-seventh twenty-twenty-one", a whopping great 17 syllables. Curiously, Feb 27 2027 is also a Saturday, so that would be 18 syllables.

 
tetsabb
1375775.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 10:06 am Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
crissdee wrote:
PDR wrote:
We also seem to have dodged the plague of numerologists claiming some special significance for the "palendromic" 12th Feb (12-02-2021).



I noticed that date, and was going to mention it as a matter of casual interest, but never got round to it. Once it had passed, it hardly seemed worth posting


You'll have your chance next year (22nd Feb). If you miss that one, you'll have to wait until 2030...


Of course, Transpondians will celebrate on December 2nd.....

 
Numerophile
1375792.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 12:08 pm Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
Numerophile wrote:
Brock wrote:
Just to add that we only get a 12-syllable date if Jan 22, Jan 27, Feb 22 or Feb 27 falls on a Saturday.

Until we get to 2027, of course...


I wasn't actually including the year in the date!

Doh! I hadn't bothered to count them...

However... What about Wednesdays?

 
Brock
1375793.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 12:15 pm Reply with quote

Numerophile wrote:
Brock wrote:
Numerophile wrote:
Brock wrote:
Just to add that we only get a 12-syllable date if Jan 22, Jan 27, Feb 22 or Feb 27 falls on a Saturday.

Until we get to 2027, of course...


I wasn't actually including the year in the date!

Doh! I hadn't bothered to count them...

However... What about Wednesdays?


I pronounce "Wednesday" with two syllables - "Wensday". I'm aware that there are some dialects that pronounce it with three, but I think mine is regarded as the standard pronunciation.

If you pronounce "Wednesday" with three syllables, then Jan 27 and Feb 27 were tied for first place this year. You'll have to wait until 2026 for a year with no 12-syllable dates.

EDIT: To complicate matters further, there are some people who pronounce "January" and "February" with only three syllables, which would give no clear winner any year.

 
Numerophile
1375804.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:46 pm Reply with quote

brock wrote:
I pronounce "Wednesday" with two syllables - "Wensday". I'm aware that there are some dialects that pronounce it with three, but I think mine is regarded as the standard pronunciation.

I have always pronounced it as "Wed'nzday", and that is not because I speak 'dialect'; my parents were both from the Home Counties (going back for generations), and as RP as you can get. No doubt suze will be along shortly with an erudite digression on the matter...

As for "January" and "February", i would probably give them no more than 3.5 syllables each; I certainly don't say "Janu-airy" or "Janu-arry".

 
Brock
1375805.  Sat Feb 27, 2021 3:12 pm Reply with quote

Numerophile wrote:
brock wrote:
I pronounce "Wednesday" with two syllables - "Wensday". I'm aware that there are some dialects that pronounce it with three, but I think mine is regarded as the standard pronunciation.

I have always pronounced it as "Wed'nzday", and that is not because I speak 'dialect'; my parents were both from the Home Counties (going back for generations), and as RP as you can get.


Nothing wrong with it, of course; but it's perhaps regarded as a little old-fashioned these days. I don't think it's the pronunciation you would generally hear on the BBC. Listen, for instance, to the announcement at the start of "Today" last Wednesday:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000sh7v

Quote:
As for "January" and "February", i would probably give them no more than 3.5 syllables each; I certainly don't say "Janu-airy" or "Janu-arry".


Nor do I; I use a schwa in the third syllable (JAN-yoo-uh-ry), although in rapid speech I'm likely to say "JAN-yoo-ry" (three syllables).

However, my initial comment was based on the premise that they were four syllables each, and thus longer than "September", "October", "November" and "December". If you disagree, please ignore the whole thing!

 

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