View previous topic | View next topic

Opera

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Alexander Howard
1214769.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:48 am Reply with quote

There must be endless scope for material on opera. When you think that as an art-form it was born and conked out all in three centuries (yes, classical opera is still performed with gusto, and still written, but very little new work of much value has appeared since the early 20th century). Its impact and internationalism are immense.

The British occupation of Egypt, and thus our march south through Africa, was partly caused by an opera, and could have been prevented by one.

 
tetsabb
1214777.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 7:10 am Reply with quote

Alexander Howard wrote:

The British occupation of Egypt, and thus our march south through Africa, was partly caused by an opera, and could have been prevented by one.


OK, I'll bite.
Aida is one of them, I guess -- some Brit nobleman wanting to see where it was set?

Do please elucidate.

 
Alexander Howard
1214793.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 8:08 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
Alexander Howard wrote:

The British occupation of Egypt, and thus our march south through Africa, was partly caused by an opera, and could have been prevented by one.


OK, I'll bite.
Aida is one of them, I guess -- some Brit nobleman wanting to see where it was set?

Do please elucidate.


Ismail Pasha, the Khedive of Egypt was a spendthrift monarch and a committed westerniser. He built a grandiose opera house in the European style and for the opening he commissioned Verdi to write Aida as a celebration of the glories of Egypt, with more than a nod to Ismail's campaigns against Ethiopia. The Khedive paid a very handsome commission for the opera, but did not think to take the copyright in return, or any share of the proceeds. Its premiere was in 1871.

Five years later, with Aida a roaring success across Europe, Verdi was rolling in success and wealth, while Egypt was mired in debt, had lost its Ethiopian conquests and its government finances were taken over by France and Britain. A few years afterwards this was secured by military occupation.

 
Spud McLaren
1214847.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 1:26 pm Reply with quote

Alexander Howard wrote:
... very little new work of much value has appeared since the early 20th century.
Not a fan of Jerry Springer: The Opera, then?

Me neither.

 
'yorz
1214857.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 2:38 pm Reply with quote

Our sadly departed forummer mckeonj once brightened up our lives with the following: the funniest moments in grand opera as described by Bernard Levin - an account of a production at the Wexford Opera Festival of La Vestiale by Spontini (a poor man's Norma).

Quote:
Levin's reportage rises to a fulfilling climax in the final chapter with his visit to Spontini's La Vestale at Wexford, rounding off this delightful book.

"But I can remember at once that 1979 was The Year of the Missing Lemon Juice. The Theatre Royal in Wexford holds 440; it was completely full that night, so there are, allowing for a few who have already died (it is not true, though it might well have been, that some died of laughter at the time), hardly more than four hundred people who now share, to the end of their lives, an experience from which the rest of the world, now and for ever, is excluded. When the last of us dies, the experience will die with us, for although it is already enshrined in legend, no one who was not an eye witness will ever really understand what we felt. Certainly I am aware that these words cannot convey more than the facts, and the facts, as so often and most particularly in this case, are only part, and a small part, too, of the whole truth. But I must try.



http://www.musicweb-international.com/levin.htm

Warning: reading this may cause some incontinence.

 
14-11-2014
1214877.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:18 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
The British occupation of Egypt, and thus our march south through Africa, was partly caused by an opera, and could have been prevented by one.

Wikipedia (edited) wrote:
On 25 August 1830, at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, an uprising followed a special performance, in honor of William I's birthday, of Daniel Auber's La Muette de Portici (The Mute Girl of Portici), a sentimental and patriotic opera set against Masaniello's uprising against the Spanish masters of Naples in the 17th century.

After the duet, "Amour sacré de la patrie", (Sacred love of Fatherland), many audience members left the theater and joined the riots which had already begun. The crowd poured into the streets shouting patriotic slogans. The rioters swiftly took possession of government buildings.

The Belgian Revolution led to the secession of the southern provinces from the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and established an independent Kingdom of Belgium.

 
Jenny
1214884.  Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:50 pm Reply with quote

Thank you for that welcome reminder 'Yorz.

14 - interesting! Thank you.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1214928.  Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:43 am Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Our sadly departed forummer mckeonj once brightened up our lives with the following: the funniest moments in grand opera as described by Bernard Levin - an account of a production at the Wexford Opera Festival of La Vestiale by Spontini (a poor man's Norma).

Quote:
Levin's reportage rises to a fulfilling climax in the final chapter with his visit to Spontini's La Vestale at Wexford, rounding off this delightful book.

"But I can remember at once that 1979 was The Year of the Missing Lemon Juice. The Theatre Royal in Wexford holds 440; it was completely full that night, so there are, allowing for a few who have already died (it is not true, though it might well have been, that some died of laughter at the time), hardly more than four hundred people who now share, to the end of their lives, an experience from which the rest of the world, now and for ever, is excluded. When the last of us dies, the experience will die with us, for although it is already enshrined in legend, no one who was not an eye witness will ever really understand what we felt. Certainly I am aware that these words cannot convey more than the facts, and the facts, as so often and most particularly in this case, are only part, and a small part, too, of the whole truth. But I must try.



http://www.musicweb-international.com/levin.htm

Warning: reading this may cause some incontinence.


5 1/2 little words there: "Ah sure, it'll be grand..."

The Theatre Royal has been demolished since, btw, and the National Opera House built in its place.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Alexander Howard
1216626.  Thu Dec 15, 2016 9:15 am Reply with quote

Verdi was a bit of a one for raising the political temperature, whether he liked it or not.

In the Risorgimento, crowds who could not openly call for the downfall of their prince or pope to make way for the unification of Italy, took to calling "Viva Verdi!" as no one could object to celebrating Italy's greatest contemporary composer. But "Verdi" was also code for "Vittorio Emanuele Re D'Italia".

In his Nabucco a chorus contains the line O mia patria, si bella e perduta ("O my fatherland, so beautiful, and lost"), which was clearly meant for Italian ears. Aida has a heartfelt O patria mia! too. He is not primarily political, but an outburst of emotion reveals a frustrated patriotism beneath.

 
tetsabb
1216680.  Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:24 pm Reply with quote

Sorry, but an image has come to mind of Ms Toksvig done up like a Wagnerian Valkyrie or Brunhilde in a possible episode of QI dedicated to the subject.
And no, this is not some weird perversion on my part...

 
crissdee
1216684.  Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:37 pm Reply with quote

Are you sure.....?

 
14-11-2014
1217465.  Tue Dec 20, 2016 3:00 am Reply with quote

Wikipedia (edited) wrote:
In 1994, 1,000 members of the animation industry ranked What's Opera, Doc? first in a list of the 50 greatest cartoons of all time.

This cartoon marks one of only three times that Fudd defeats Bugs Bunny. This is also the only one of the three where Fudd shows regret for defeating Bugs.

 
dr bartolo
1217814.  Thu Dec 22, 2016 9:36 am Reply with quote

Operatic recycling is quite a thing:

There have been around seventy operas sharing the same plot: the tale of Orpheus and Eurydice.

On a similar vein, a single liberetto ( Artaserse) by the Italian liberettist Metastasio was apparently set to music around ninety times.

The overture that we associate with Rossini's Barber of Seville was actually originally written for another opera, Aureliano in Palmira. Two years later, he recycled it into yet another opera (Elisabetta, regina d'Inghilterra). It was only in 1816 when the piece of busic became attached to the Barber

It may be interesting to note that the title role of Aureliano in Palmira was written for a castrato, possibily the last major work to be done so.
In case anyone has yet to recognize it, my username is actually that of a character from The barber of Seville ;)

 
Spud McLaren
1217913.  Fri Dec 23, 2016 7:00 am Reply with quote

dr bartolo wrote:
... the piece of busic ...
That's quite a heavy cold you have there, Doc.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1218366.  Wed Dec 28, 2016 6:06 am Reply with quote

Alexander Howard wrote:
(yes, classical opera is still performed with gusto, and still written, but very little new work of much value has appeared since the early 20th century).


I see... People better throw out their Britten and Shostakovich archives then...

dr bartolo wrote:
Operatic recycling is quite a thing:

There have been around seventy operas sharing the same plot: the tale of Orpheus and Eurydice.


I wouldn't necessarily call that recycling. Orpheus and Eurydice is a sujet that obviously lends itself to opera, so it's understandable that it has inspired a lot of composers.

dr bartolo wrote:
On a similar vein, a single liberetto ( Artaserse) by the Italian liberettist Metastasio was apparently set to music around ninety times.


I'll never complain about my surname again...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group