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Series N - Not Nearly

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14-11-2014
1213334.  Fri Nov 25, 2016 10:44 pm Reply with quote

Fry, QI S07E09 (recycled fact) wrote:
You have a range of three and the most expensive one is unbelievably expensive. And the second one is really a quarter as much, it seems just as nice, really. And then there's a third one that's really very cheap. And most people will go for the second one. They think it's just right, they think, "Ooh the first one's too expensive… that's a bargain."

A good example, supposedly, of Goldilocks pricing is the air fare, actually. The basic economy price for a transatlantic airliner is about £500 and then there's business class for a mere £3,500 and then first class with a full-size bed and the ability to order food whenever you want and other things for £8,000. And according to Goldilocks pricing, business class with all it's perks looks like a bargain when compared to the £8,000 even though it's still seven times as expensive as economy.

From £5.99 wine to the French boy:

Even the winning adult rowers didn't know that they were Olymic Champions. Apparently they received a 1900 World's Fair statue, so they believed that they were World Champions (same date?). A national invitation in a newspaper used the name international "great Fair Championships", presumably hosted by the Rowing-Club Paris and the Société Nautique de la Basse Seine.

Winners haven't never received a gold medal. That happened in 2012, after 112 years. The winners still represent the Olympic flag instead of their country.

 
Spike
1213370.  Sat Nov 26, 2016 5:39 am Reply with quote

And the connection between the Stephen Fry quote and your text is?
I really, truly don't get it.

 
'yorz
1213375.  Sat Nov 26, 2016 5:57 am Reply with quote

Join ---> club

 
suze
1213398.  Sat Nov 26, 2016 7:23 am Reply with quote

The 1900 Olympic Games were an odd beast, and even Baron de Coubertin himself admitted later that they were a shambles.

The games were run as part of Expo 1900 in Paris, and the IOC (president: de Coubertin) and the USFSA (French Football Association, secretary: de Coubertin) both asserted the right to run them. Depending who you believe, de Coubertin either walked away from or was fired from his position at the USFSA as a result - but the Olympics were ultimately organized by the Expo committee and the French Shooting Association.

The events were spread over five months, and there was no opening or closing ceremony. Winners in some sports received silver (not gold) medals, and uniquely, the 1900 Olympic medals were square rather than round. Most sports didn't issue medals at all, and winners received trophies instead. Winners at fencing received money, even though the Olympics were supposed to be strictly amateur.

The IOC has since recalculated the medals table according to modern principles (gold, silver, and bronze). That was primarily done to keep sports statisticans happy, and whether physical medals have ever been awarded according to that retrospective recalculation I'm unsure; 14-11-2014 suggests that they have but I cannot immediately find any evidence for that.

Even today quite a few sports consider the Olympic events to form the World's Championship for that year, although a World's Rowing Championship under that name was not instituted until 1962. Precisely what the athletes thought they were competing for is in some cases unclear, but it's certainly fair to say that not all of them would ever have heard of the Olympic Games, let alone believed themselves to be taking part in them.

 
14-11-2014
1213416.  Sat Nov 26, 2016 11:42 am Reply with quote

Quote:
whether physical medals have ever been awarded according to that retrospective recalculation I'm unsure; 14-11-2014 suggests that they have but I cannot immediately find any evidence for that.

On paper, after 112 years. Typically you'll have to win a medal to receive it physically. I've only verified the Olympic flag.

Quote:
Even today quite a few sports consider the Olympic events to form the World's Championship for that year, although a World's Rowing Championship under that name was not instituted until 1962.

Rough translation wrote:
In 1960, when I discovered the Dutch participation in Paris, I wrote a letter to Madam Zanchi, IOC staff, and asked for the dates of the Olympic Rowing Championships in 1900. The dates were the same as the dates of the World Championships Rowing in 1900. It was the same event!

This official route doesn't really matter. Their bronze 1900 World Expo statue confirmed the idea that it was a World Championships event, according to an Australian grandchild who now owns the statue.

Quote:
Precisely what the athletes thought they were competing for is in some cases unclear, but it's certainly fair to say that not all of them would ever have heard of the Olympic Games, let alone believed themselves to be taking part in them.

In this specific case:

Newspaper (invitation procedure of the selected rowing society) wrote:
den grooten Tentoonstellings-wedstrijd te Parijs, den 26sten Augustus

the great Expo-race in Paris, the 26th of August

Apparantly members of the selected rowing society were too busy to compete in France, so they contacted another rowing society.

 
CharliesDragon
1213477.  Sun Nov 27, 2016 3:24 am Reply with quote

Spike wrote:
And the connection between the Stephen Fry quote and your text is?
I really, truly don't get it.


It's a recycled fact, which is expressed in "Fry, QI S07E09 (recycled fact) wrote." As far as 14's comments go, it's not that obscure, they do say they're moving on from French wine to other matters, too.

 
Olinguito
1213566.  Sun Nov 27, 2016 6:46 pm Reply with quote

Q: Who's the best person to invite to a "don't come" party?

A: A eunuch.

 
Olinguito
1213573.  Mon Nov 28, 2016 1:06 am Reply with quote

As for ducks jumping down from high places, that's what they do naturally! Ducks in the wild sometimes build their nests in tree holes or somewhere high up (to be out of reach of ground predators) and some time after hatching the ducklings jump down from their nesting place to find their way to the nearest pool of water.

https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/read-and-learn/helping-birds/nesting_mallards/ducklings.aspx

Quote:
If the nest is some way from water, this first journey can be the most perilous time in a duckling’s life. Where a nest is high up (up a tree or on a balcony) the birds must first jump to the ground. Being very light and covered in down they usually come to no harm during the fall. If the landing area is very hard and there is cause for concern, placing something soft like straw or a blanket underneath will cushion the fall.

 

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